CARLTON

HOTEL BRAWL

George Kelland, aged 37, was charged at the Carlton Police with the wilful murder of Henry John Morris, laborer, as the result of a fight. The accused admitted to Constable Aheolem that he had knocked the deceased out. Kellands bail was refused.

Thank you to the group who joined me in Chinatown this evening!  Although we got off to a shaky start with our first alleyway otherwise occupied, you survived your journey to the dark side!!  ~ Madam

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MANSLAUGHTER BY A SAILOR.

MELBOURNE

In the Criminal Court to-day, before Mr. Justice Hood and a jury of 12, Emil Forsell, a young Norwegian sailor, was charged with having, on November 20 last, wilfully murdered Sophia Rigg, in Latrobe street west, near to Spencer street. An interpreter had to be sworn, as accused was not sufficiently acquainted with the English language. The evidence brought to prove the case for the Crown showed that deceased was on her way to visit her son, and was spoken to by her niece. Shortly afterwards accused was seen trying to commit an offence, and when interfered with the woman was dead. Death was caused by sudden and violent suffocation. A statement was made by the prisoner to the effect that he was so drunk that he did not know what he was doing, and he thought deceased was a woman with whom he had been in company with all day. Mr. Paul, counsel for the defence, submitted that the evidence was not clear that prisoner had caused the death of Mrs. Rigg, and that he way too drunk to know what he was doing. He asked the jury to return a verdict of manslaughter. Mr. Justice Hood said the authorities seemed to show that the conviction must be murder or nothing, and later, in addressing the jury on the point, said the law was not satisfactory in this. Juries, he pointed out, refused frequently to convict in cases of illegal operations, and persons who ought to be punished escaped. After the retirement of the jury an argument was heard whether the jury could convict for manslaughter, and Mr. Justice Hood said he would instruct the jury that they could do so, and reserve a case on the point for tho Full Court. The jury having been so instructed, almost immediately returned a verdict of not guilty of murder, but guilty of manslaughter, and accused was remanded for sentence, pending the decision of tha Full Court on the point reserved.

A VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER.

FOOTSCRAY

Mrs. Ellen McNabb. a young woman, was placed on trial at the Criminal Court today for the murder of her infant child at Footscray on November 20. The jury returned a verdict of manslaughter but strongly recommended the accused mercy on account of the provocation she had received.

The Chief Justice in passing sentence found the prisoner had been deserted by a villainous husband, who did not care what became of her or the child.  She had been illtreated and starved by her husband.  He would give full weight to the recommendation.  The prisoner was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment.

MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE

FITZROY

In the Criminal Court to-day Ernest Arthur Sims was charged with the manslaughter of Mary Maud Whitesides, at Fitzroy on November 19. Accused pleaded not guilty. Whitesides died from burns sustained at accused’s house. At the close of the Crown’s case Justice Hodges said that there was no clear evidence to go to the jury that deceased died from any act of the accused. By direction the jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and Sims was discharged.

YOUNG MAN CHARGED.

Richard Clarence Skinner, 21, of South Melbourne, was arrested on a charge with having at Bacchus Marsh on November 19, with intent to murder, Arthur Edwards, a farm hand, of Balwyn. He had a severe wound on the chin and was unable to speak. By writing answers to questions by the detectives Edwards stated he had been shot while entering a car on the Ballarat Road sit Bacchus Marsh.

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YOUTH CHARGED WITH MANSLAUGHTER

Reginald Charles Burrows, 18- year-old sheet metal worker, of Percy st, West Brunswick, was committed for trial on a charge of manslaughter by Mr Burke, SM, city coroner, yesterday.

Mr Burke conducted an inquest into the death of Rupert Francis Bowd, 36, of Evans st, East Brunswick, who died in Royal Melbourne Hospital on November 18. Police alleged that Burrows went to Brunswick railway platform and fought with Bowd after Burrows’ sisters had told him that Bowd had behaved offensively towards them. During the fight Bowd fell on to the railway line and suffered injuries from which he died later.

Wife Murder

At Albert Park on the 18th November 1896, a young man named Alexander Quinn, aged twenty-three, an ex-warder at the Ararat Lunatic Asylum, shot his wife dead, and then attempted to commit suicide, but, failing to take his own life, be gave himself up at the police station. It would appear from Quinn’s statement that, being without work or means, he and his wife proceeded to Albert Park with the intention of committing a double suicide. Mrs. Quinn who was twenty-five years of age, took a revolver, and attempted to put a bullet through her head, but failed; whereupon her husband took the weapon and shot her dead. He then tied to shot himself, but did not succeed, He then sought to drown himself in the Albert Park lake, and, again failing to put an end to his life, he proceeded to the police station and reported the matter. In his possession were found two marriage certificates

PANMURE

SHOCKING MURDER AT PANMURE.

A most diabolical murder and supposed outrage has been committed at the township of Panmure, 16 miles from Warrnambool. The victim is a girl 10 years of age, named Margaret Nolan, the daughter of a well-to-do farmer, living about a mile and a half out of the village. The girl was sent in to the township with butter at 3 o’clock on Saturday, November 17, and then went further on to what is termed the old township over the river. From this place she was seen returning, and as she was passing up the road going in the direction of her home at about 4 o’clock, she was walking beside a man on horseback who has been identified as James Morgan, a farmer at Lake Warrnambool. At 8 o’clock in the evening, finding that the girl had not returned, her parents became uneasy, and the alarm being given, the whole township turned out in a search which was kept up all night. At 4 o’clock on Sunday morning the party, headed by the father of the child, discovered her dead body lying amongst some tall ferns about-half a mile, from the township. It was lying on its back with the arms extended, the clothes disarranged, and a fearful wound in the neck. In her left hand the child grasped some ferns, and all around her were evidences of a desperate struggle. Morgan has been arrested, and the black trackers have been sent for to follow up important traces which have been found. Morgan has been committed for trial for the murder.

FOOTSCRAY

MURDER BY UNKNOWN MAN.

At an inquest into the circumstances surrounding the death of William Henry Rolley, who was shot in Irvine street, Footscray (V.), on November 17, a few minutes before midnight, a verdict of wilful murder against an unknown man was recorded. Dennis John Bourke, a labourer, of Albert street, Footscray, said that he met Rolley in Nicholson street, and they walked about Nicholson and Irvine streets until after 11 o’clock. Each had bottles containing beer in his pockets. Rolley entered a lane near Irvine street, and was joined by a strange man. The stranger said, “I could do a drink,” and the three men drank together. Rolley suggested obtaining pies for supper, and they walked to a shop in Nicholson street. The third man placed a bottle of beer on the supper table, but removed it at the request of the shop keeper. Outside the shop Rolley said to the stranger. “Are you going to open that beer and he replied, No, I will take if home.” Rolley said. “Better open it. We have treated you well.” The beer was then opened and handed to witness, and as they were about to drink the stranger said “There are two constables.” The three men walked towards Irvine street, and as they turned the corner the unknown man began to hurry towards the railway station. Rolley called out, “Wait a minute.” and chased him. The stranger turned and fired two shots. Rolley fell on his face, with a wound in his forehead and another in his right shoulder.

BENDIGO

‘Suspect warned’ before being shot

Jedd Houghton

Jedd Houghton

Police Special Operations Group members had repeatedly told a police shooting suspect to drop his gun before hitting him with three shotgun blasts at close range, the Melbourne Coroner’s Court heard yesterday. Jedd Houghton, 23, died almost instantly during a raid on a caravan park in Bendigo on November 17,1988.  He had been an alleged member of a gang planning an armed robbery and there was a link be tween him and the killing of two constables in Walsh Street, South Yarra, Graeme Morrish, QC, assisting Coroner Hal Hallenstein, said. Mr Morrish said Houghton’s death was linked to that of Graeme Jensen on October 11, 1988, and a shooting the following day when Constables Steven Tynan and Damian Eyre were gunned down while checking an abandoned car.  Jensen, a close associate of Houghton, had been killed while armed robbery squad detectives were trying to arrest him at Narre Warren, the hearing was told. From the outset, due to his association with Jensen, police had considered Houghton a suspect in the killings of the two constables in Walsh Street, Mr Morrish said. Houghton, Jensen, and two other men were believed to be planning an armed robbery, he said. Visual and electronic surveillance had been carried out by the Bureau of Criminal Intelligence of Houghton’s movements in the period leading up to the SOG raid, he said. It had been decided to arrest Houghton as a suspect in the Walsh Street killings. Four SOG members had entered the cabin where Houghton and his girlfriend, Kim Cameron, had been staying, at 12.08pm. Mr Morrish said two had gone for Houghton and the others had placed a hood over Ms Cameron’s head before whisking her away.  Houghton had pointed a gun at SOG member Sergeant Paul Carr and had been repeatedly told 10 drop the weapon, he said. Fearing one of them would be shot, Sergeant Carr and his partner had both fired their pump action shotguns, acting in self defence. The hearing, attended by Houghton’s mother, sister and Ms Cameron, viewed a nine-minute videotape which included graphic footage of the blood-soaked body and horrific wounds.  The cause of death was a shot gun blast fired at a distance of 10cm, hitting him in the chest.  Two other blasts fired from 10cm had hit Houghton in his upper body and arm. Three revolvers and a pistol had been found in the cabin. The hearing continues.