International research has found a number of common characteristics among serial killers and their murders:

• serial murder is predominantly committed by white/Caucasian males of moderate to high intelligence.
• serial killers are usually aged in their mid-twenties with a mean age of 30, and the typical age range between 25 and 40 years.
• serial killings are usually intra-racial.
• serial killers are more likely to act alone.
• serial killers most commonly use strangulation or beating as a means of killing.
• male serial killers are more likely to use strangulation, stabbing, ligature weapons, hands or feet (beating), cause injury to victim’s head and genitalia (anus), bind victims and sexually assault victims.
• female serial killers are relatively uncommon – an overseas study of 200 serial killers found 12 to 17 percent were women.
• female serial killers were motivated by a need for financial security, revenge, enjoyment, and sexual stimulation.
• female serial killers who act alone are more likely to use poison as a method of killing.
• serial killers usually premeditate their crimes, frequently fantasising and planning with detail, including the specific victim.
• serial killers are likely to use similar event locations (but different physical locations) for their crimes, move the body from one location to another and dispose of the body in remote locations.

The latex mask worn by John Field as Gerry Gee’s stand in now in the collection at Museum Victoria, Carlton. The mask was fashioned to resemble Gerry with a narrow slit to breath though and two eyes holes. “It was not a fun thing to wear, and would get hot and sweaty, hearing was difficult and worst of all I had difficulty seeing much except what was straight in front of me” Fields stated.

 

John Field was born in 1949 and grew up at 48 Belgrave Road, East Malvern next door to Denzil Howsons Assistant Programme Manager at GTV9 (Tarax Show). At the age of 9 years old (1959) and in Grade 4, John Field started working as a human stand in for Gerry Gee in a new TV series “The Adventures of Gerry Gee”. Wearing a latex mask to resemble Gerry Gee, Fields was filmed at long distance for action shots. The 5 min episode began on the Tarax Show in 1959 and quickly became a regular and popular segment running for three years. John Field also played Gerry Gee in the 1960 Melbourne Moomba Parade with King Corky.

 

Gerry Gee, was a ventriloquist Doll who was brought to life in 1956 by Ron Blaskett, for GTV9’s (channel 9) first live test broadcast from Mt Dandenong, Melbourne Victoria. Gerry was imported from the US at a cost £200 and was named after the station. Ron, wife Merle Blaskett also a ventriloquist and Gerry are the only survivors of the test broadcast (2016). The comedy duo became household names as rich a one as any Aussie entertainer, on radio and TV, on The Tarax Show, IMT (In Melbourne Tonight) and Young Talent Time. And the act travelled the world, playing to millions at the 1975 Toronto Expo, cyclone victims in Darwin and Diggers in Vietnam. Gerry Gee and Ron Blaskett retired together after career of 56 years, Aussie TV’s first and foremost ventriloquist duo.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 22, 1914

CHARGED WITH MURDER.

Brunswick Court was crowded on July 22 when Frank White, 22, a wood machinist, appeared on remand on a charge of having inflicted grievous bodily harm upon Richard Wood, baker, of Audley street. East Brunswick, on Saturday night, July 11. The charge was altered to one of murder, and White was further remanded. The Bench was occupied by Mr Read Murphv. P.M. (chairman), and Messrs Allard, Dowsley and Fleming-. J’s.P. Sergeant P. McLoughlin stated that Wood had died in the Melbourne Hospital as the result of depressed fracture of the skull, alleged to have been caused by a blow with a bottle from White.  Mr R. G. Greene applied to Mr Justice Hodges, in the Supreme Court, for bail, which had been refused by the Brunswick magistrates. Bail was granted in two sureties of £5 00 each, and White’s own bond of £1000.

ON THIS DAY – July 22, 1922

 

The second trial was concluded of Reuben Fox, aged 26 years, who was charged with the murder of Mrs Josephine McLaughlin on July 22. Mrs McLaughlin was murdered returning from a ball In the Yea Shire Hall. The body was then placed in the river. After a retirement of over seven hours, the foreman of the jury announced that an agreement could not be reached, and they were discharged. A third trial was then ordered.

ON THIS DAY – July 22, 1988

PENTRIDGE PRISON

CONVICTED murderer Alex Tsakmakis’s brutal killing earned very little sympathy among his fellow inmates.  Before we was clobbered to death behind bars, he too had carried out a prison killing. Before coming to police attention, Alex Tsakmakis appeared to be a company director and Ivanhoe family man. But his actions made him nothing but pure evil. Tskamakis, 40, was defenceless when he was attacked from behind on July 22, 1988. Taking lunch to a group of prisoners in the maximum security industry yard at about 11.30am, he was beaten on the back of the head by Russell St bomber Craig Minogue, 26. Tsakmakis remained standing at the first blow, but fell on the second. He was hit up to seven times with a pillow case full of 5kg gym weights and suffered a fractured skull and brain damage. Despite being given immediate medical attention and being rushed to hospital, he died six days later. Minogue received a second murder conviction but because he is serving it concurrently with his Russell St bombing sentence he has been given just three more months for Tskamakis’s death. The sentencing judge, Justice George Hampel believed Tskamakis’s life was not worth any more than that. At the time Minogue said he had killed Tskamakis in self defence because feared he would have been Tsakmakis’s next victim. Minogue will be eligible for parole in 2016.

On this day …….. 22nd of July 1891

On this day in 1891, a bizarre scene on the streets of Sydney wandering in the streets of Kings Cross, looking quite out of place, even in an area noted for its variety of human eccentricity, were two North American Red Indian Chiefs, apparently lost, unable to find their way back to their teepee, which was located at some distance, where the Wirth’s Circus was playing. The two men, American Bear and Eagle Elk, had been brought to Australia by the circus. Their presence in Kings Cross was alarming the locals, and the pale faces were attacking the Indians. Friendless, a fellow North American came to rescue them from their attackers. In a charming twist of history, their rescuer turned out to be a retiredUS Cavalry Captain on holidays in Sydney.

 

On This Day ……. 22nd of July 1921

Representing the wages due to the 12 seamen who were sent to the Geelong gaol on this day in 1921, as a result of their refusal to obey the orders of the captain of
the barque Archibald Russell, £931/10/ has been received by the Customs officials. The men were each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment, and their wages will be paid to them when they are liberated.

 

On this day …….. 22nd of July 1851

Gold was found on this day in 1851, in the streets, Melbourne. Mr H. Firencham, while walking down Bourke St, picked up 4 different size quartz pebble, bearing gold. Firencham also claimed to find gold at Flag Staff and Benevolent Asylum hills. Mr Davis of Elizabeth street, also had the luck to find gold in the gutter at his front door.

 

After a failed attempt to derail a police train, and the shootout that followed, Ned Kelly was taken into custody at Glenrowan in June 1880. To capitalise on his capture, photographer William Burman staged a re-enactment within weeks, having replicated the notorious bushranger’s homemade suit of armour. The copyright laws at the time meant that photographers could patent their images and charge for each individual use. Kelly remained a subject of intense public interest until his execution, 13 days after his trial, on November 11, 1880.

 

A man named Sydney Darnley of Sydney, Australia, built a scale model of the Sydney Town Hall using 74,000 seashells.