On this day ……… 31st of March 1909

A young man named Albert Rodgers, aged 18 years, suffered a serious accident on this day in 1909. Rodgers who was working at the corner of Victoria rd and Clarendon st., in South Melbourne, was hit on the head when a brick fell a distance of about 10ft. Rodgers was taken to hospital but was died on arrival.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 31, 2004

Masked gunmen entered the Brunswick Club on Sydney Road, Brunswick, at approximately 6.40pm on 31 March 2004, driving a Ford Falcon EF XR6 station wagon. Moran ran from his place at the bar, over a poker machine, through a glass window before the gunman caught up with him and shot him twice, the fatal bullet being fired into the back of his head from a few centimetres away. Associate Herbert “Bertie” Wrout was severely wounded but survived the attack. Keith Faure, his brother Noel Faure and associate Evangelos Goussis were charged with the murder. On 3 May 2006, Faure pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life imprisonment with a non-parole period of 19 years for the murders of Moran and Lewis Caine, who was killed two months after Moran. Former Kickboxing champ Goussis, 40, of Geelong was found guilty of Moran’s murder on 29 May 2008 in the Victorian Supreme Court. Goussis had stormed into the Brunswick Club and shot Moran as he cowered in a corner. Goussis and two others reportedly accepted a $150,000 contract from Tony Mokbel to kill Moran, the Victorian Supreme Court heard. After five days deliberation, the jury also found Goussis guilty of intentionally causing serious injury to Wrout, but not guilty of his attempted murder. Goussis was also convicted of murdering Caine. In February 2009, Goussis was sentenced to a minimum 30 years in prison for Moran’s murder. Lewis Moran was suspected in ordering the death of underworld Hitman Dino Dibra. On 7 May 2007, Carl Williams was convicted of commissioning Lewis Moran’s murder, and sentenced to 25 years’ imprisonment. Williams died in Barwon prison, on 19 April 2010, as the result of an attack by a fellow inmate.

 

ON THIS DAY – March 31, 1949

WARRAGUL

Steven Kelly, 46, farm labourer, of Warragul, who had pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of John Thomas Bateson, 74, pensioner, at Warragul, on March 31, was sentenced to six years’ imprisonment by Mr Justice O’Bryan in the Criminal Court. His Honour described Kelly’s crime as dreadful, but said that he accepted the view that Kelly was inflamed with drink, and that Bateson’s death occurred during a drunken quarrel.

 

ON THIS DAY – March 31, 1918

MELBOURNE

At an inquiry regarding the death of Albert Greaves (28) in the Melbourne Hospital on March 31 as the result of injuries to his head, the Coroner committed James Gibson for trial on a charge of manslaughter. It is alleged that in the course of an altercation in Swanston-street Gibson struck Greaves. Police constables gave evidence to the effect that Gibson resisted violently when he was arrested.

 

ON This Day – 31st March 1908

It was arranged by the Penal authorities, that Mr. R. Paterson, governor of the Geelong gaol, shall take over, the charge of the Melbourne Gaol on this day in 1908. He return to Geelong in the evening, and hand over the care of the Geelong gaol to Mr Furnell, of Beechworth, who has been appointed to succeed him. Mr. Paterson was extremely popular with his staff, who regret his departure from Geelong.

 

On this day ……… 31st of March 1855

An interesting character turned up in Beechworth, on this day in 1855, needing assistance. His name was Thomas Allen, a veteran of Waterloo, where he had been wounded. Allen had also been at Ballarat during the Eureka uprising, his tent had been burnt, and he had lost all his possessions. While in Beechworth he had lost his horse. The good hearted people in Beechworth rallied round, starting up an appeal, and brought him a new horse.

 

 

On this day ……… 31st of March 1897

Rutherglen in North East Victoria played host to the Victorian Governor Lord Brassey, who opened the district’s new Viticulture Collage. The college had been the dream of the. Rutherglen vigneron a since the 1880s. They proposed the building of an institution which could carry out practical experiments for vine culture and wine making, and also train skilled staff for the industry. Rutherglen at the time was the centre of the wine growing industry. There was 350 vigneron’s within a 35 mile radius of the town.

 

 

On this day ……… 31st of March 1908

Mrs. Jane Barwick, aged 40 years of North Brighton, Melbourne accidentally swallowed a plate containing 13 false teeth while drinking some broth for dinner on this day in 1908. A medical man ordered her removal to the Melbourne Hospital, where her neck was sliced open to have them removed.

 

 

On this day ……… 31st of March 1917

Accident was caused on platform No.3, at Flinders-street station on this day in 1917. When the 12.52 pm, train arrived several people were struck and knocked down by an open door of a compartment of the incoming train from Camberwell. The names of the people struck by the door were either bruised or cut are:—Stephen Butler, G. Smith, G. Myers, W. Berudt and G. Haywury.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1870

A wagon loaded with seventy five barrels of gun powder blew up at Martins Gap out side Mansfield, on this day in 1870. The driver, William Jewell, was literally blown to pieces. Five horses were also killed on the spot

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 30th March 1948

The jury in the Criminal Court took only eight minutes to decide that John K. Donnelly, 19, apprentice carpenter, of Ferntree Gully, was not guilty of a charge of the murder or manslaughter of his stepfather, John Palmer. Donnelly told the court that he shot his stepfather on this day in 1948 when Palmer was attacking his mother. He knew his mother was going to have a baby and his only thought was to prevent Palmer from killing her or earning her such harm that she would die. Mrs Palmer, mother of the accused and nine other children, told the court that Palmer had beaten her regularly.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1891

Workmen on the railway to Mansfield, under construction at the time, unearthed a skeleton. No one was quite sure who it was but locals thought it was probably King Alfred, an aboriginal tribal leader who had been elevated to regional status by the early landholders in the area. When Alfred died, he was buried near the spot at Merton where the excavations were being made.