ON THIS DAY…… 30th September 1865

An escape was made by two prisoners from the gaol, named William Henry Thompson and Thomas Reynolds. The former was undergoing a sentence of three years for stealing in the Queen’s Head Hotel, and had been in confinement about fourteen months ; the latter was also undergoing a similar sentence for assaulting an old man and had served half his time. It appears that the prisoners acted as cooks, and at a quarter to six o’clock were let into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. The kitchen is situated in the new wing of the building, and is the only part of it which is not surrounded by the high wall. The windows are protected by strong iron bars, about six inches apart, and which were supposed to be imbedded into the bluestone some two and a half inches. One inch, however, was all that the bar, which was wrenched by the aid of two pieces of wood, had been so fixed. At a few minutes before six one of the warders on his way to the gaol noticed three men standing near to the Pivot Hotel, about a hundred yards from the gaol, fancying that one of them was like Reynolds, he challenged him, saying, “Is that you, Reynolds?” The words were no sooner uttered than the three men separated, the stranger making tracks towards town, and Thompson making a bolt towards Chilwell. The warder, whose name was Kerley, let them go, but made sure of Reynolds, and at a quarter past six that worthy was comfortably ‘installed in his cell. Another of the warders coming across the flat noticed Thompson, and identified him as a prisoner by the brand on his trousers. He immediately started in pursuit, and Thompson, who ran like a deer, headed towards Chilwell, brandishing a knife before him. The chase lasted for a mile and a half, while in turning to attract the attention of the police the warder missed sight of Thompson, who had cleared a fence in gallant style, and disappeared in a Mr. Dobson’s garden, near the Cremorne Hotel. Here the scent was lost, but there is little doubt that Thompson, who is a most desperate character, will soon be safely lodged in the gaol, as active search was being made for him yesterday. When last seen he had a small bundle under his arm, supposed to contain a change of clothes. Of the third man nothing, we believe, has been seen. His part in the business, it is supposed, was that of outside assistant.” Reynolds received an additional 12 months while Thompson was recaptured in Adelaide.

 

On This Day – September 30, 1913

The adjourned inquiry into the death of the boy John Adam Anderson, whose decapitated body was found in a paddock at Wharparilla on September 3o, was concluded at Echuca to-day. David Clarence Freeman, aged 14 years, who is charged with having murdered Anderson, was present in custody. He was allowed to sit by his father in the body of the court, and he appeared to be the least concerned of anyone present. Raymond Josiah Francis, 12 years, said he remembered a fight taking place at Torrumbarry State school between accused and deceased about twelve months ago. Deceased had the best of the fight, and Freeman threatened by signs to shoot Anderson. James Henderson said on one occasion whilst in school accused was writing on the floor with rifle bullets, and when remonstrated with he placed a bullet in a rifle and pointed the weapon at the teacher. The coroner committed Freeman for trial on a charge of having wilfully murdered Anderson.

On this day …….. 30th September 1864

Escape of a Notorious Bushranger. A notorious bushranger was arrested near Seymour and charged with horse-stealing. On being brought before the Kilmore bench he gave the name of Lowry, but he was known to the police under the aliases of ‘Cook and Davis, and was suspected of several robberies in the neighbourhood of Heathcote and at other places. When he was arrested, by Constable Deasy, Lowry, it appears, he firer at the constable as he approached the hut, the constable returning the fire, his shot carrying away a portion of the bushranger’s lip. In consequence of having given refuge to the bushranger the hut keeper was also arrested. The prisoner, who was remanded by the Kilmore bench, effected his escape from the gaol, and has not since been recaptured.

 

On this day …….. 30th September 1939

Strange scenes were witnessed at Victoria Dock, when interstate buyers were so eager to secure pedigreed stud sheep that reached Melbourne from oversea that they wanted an auction sale on the wharf. This effort failed, but a sale was held in the city half an hour after the sheep were unloaded, and the first of them were sold before the sheep reached quarantine less than a mile from the dock. The consignment was brought to Australia by Mr. W. R. Ross, and was due in Melbourne nearly a fortnight earlier. Breeders from New South Wales, South Australia, and Victoria stormed the ship. A Dorset Horn that won the championship at the centennial English show was sold to a New South Wales breeder for 250 guineas.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th September 1865

An escape was made by two prisoners from the gaol, named William Henry Thompson and Thomas Reynolds. The former was undergoing a sentence of three years for stealing in the Queen’s Head Hotel, and had been in confinement about fourteen months ; the latter was also undergoing a similar sentence for assaulting an old man and had served half his time. It appears that the prisoners acted as cooks, and at a quarter to six o’clock were let into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. The kitchen is situated in the new wing of the building, and is the only part of it which is not surrounded by the high wall. The windows are protected by strong iron bars, about six inches apart, and which were supposed to be imbedded into the bluestone some two and a half inches. One inch, however, was all that the bar, which was wrenched by the aid of two pieces of wood, had been so fixed. At a few minutes before six one of the warders on his way to the gaol noticed three men standing near to the Pivot Hotel, about a hundred yards from the gaol, fancying that one of them was like Reynolds, he challenged him, saying, “Is that you, Reynolds?” The words were no sooner uttered than the three men separated, the stranger making tracks towards town, and Thompson making a bolt towards Chilwell. The warder, whose name was Kerley, let them go, but made sure of Reynolds, and at a quarter past six that worthy was comfortably ‘installed in his cell. Another of the warders coming across the flat noticed Thompson, and identified him as a prisoner by the brand on his trousers. He immediately started in pursuit, and Thompson, who ran like a deer, headed towards Chilwell, brandishing a knife before him. The chase lasted for a mile and a half, while in turning to attract the attention of the police the warder missed sight of Thompson, who had cleared a fence in gallant style, and disappeared in a Mr. Dobson’s garden, near the Cremorne Hotel. Here the scent was lost, but there is little doubt that Thompson, who is a most desperate character, will soon be safely lodged in the gaol, as active search was being made for him yesterday. When last seen he had a small bundle under his arm, supposed to contain a change of clothes. Of the third man nothing, we believe, has been seen. His part in the business, it is supposed, was that of outside assistant.” Reynolds received an additional 12 months while Thompson was recaptured in Adelaide.

 

On This Day – September 30, 1906

At the Moe (Vic.) court house, before Mr. C. A. Creswell, P.M., the adjourned inquest on the bodies of Sophia Lumsden Mansfield, aged two years and a half, and Janet Cook Mansfield, aged 14 months, who were murdered by their mother, Agnes Mansfield, at Narracan East, on Sunday, 30th September was concluded.

Accused arrived at Moe in charge of Senior-constable Noble and a trained nurse from Sale, where she had been incarcerated pending the inquiry. The woman was met at the Moe railway station by her father, mother and husband, whom she failed to recognise. Her mother was so overcome in giving her evidence that she had to be removed from the court house. Dr. Phelps stated that the wounds inflicted on the little ones were alike, extending from the lower region of the ear to the centre of the throat, all the main vessels being severed. Death was due to syncope, caused by loss of blood. The mother of the accused woman, in giving evidence, stated that her daughter had been devotedly attached to her husband and children. Accused was committed for trial for feloniously and wilfully murdering her two children. She will be tried at the Sale sessions on 11th December. She was taken to the Melbourne Gaol by Constable Taylor and the nurse.

On this day …….. 30th September 1813

The coins “holey dollar” and “dump” were created by punching the centre out of Spanish dollars. The external circle was the “holey dollar” and the punched-out inner circle was the “dump”. They were only ever used in New South Wales, Australia, and on Prince Edward Island, Canada. In 1813, Governor Lachlan Macquarie faced the problem of currency shortages in the young colony of New South Wales. When the British Government sent £10,000 worth of Spanish dollars (40,000 Spanish dollars) to New South Wales, Maquarie took the initiative to create “holey dollars” and “dumps”. The dumps were assigned a value of 15 pence and were restruck with a crown on the obverse side and the denomination on the reverse. The dollars were worth 5 shillings, and were stamped with “New South Wales 1813” around the hole. The coins were released on 30 September 1813. The holey dollar became the first official currency produced specifically for circulation in Australia. The coins were replaced by sterling coinage from 1822.

On This Day – September 30, 1931

The Burwood police are investigating a story told them by an undertaker concerning elaborate arrangements made with him for a funeral on Tuesday.

A woman who is believed to have no family, died in a private hospital at Burwood, and a man, whom the undertaker understood to be her husband, ordered an expensive funeral. An elaborate polished oak coffin, costing £40, was ordered, also several mourning coaches, and wreath costing £2 2s.

Yesterday the undertaker, the mourners, and the clergyman waited for the “husband” of the dead woman, but he did not arrive. The undertaker, refusing to allow the funeral to be carried out, cancelled the arrangements until sufficient money to pay expenses was forthcoming. The mourners commandeered the coaches , and searched Canterbury in vain for the missing man.

The police have learned that the man’s employer was with him at 2 p.m. In a hotel which they left in the employer’s car to go to the funeral chambers. On the way the “widower” asked his employer to stop and allow him to enter a house to get money. There the employer waited for some time; and then made a search of the house, but found no trace of the man.

So far the undertaker, the private hospital, and the Macquarie Street specialist who attended the woman are still unpaid and the “widowed husband” is missing.

The woman will probably be given a paupers funeral.

ON THIS DAY…… 29th September 1888

The Police Court building in Geelong was well crowded with an eager throng of people eager hear the occasion of the initial proceedings taken by the police against a young woman named Lizzie Splatt, who was charged with having murdered her illegitimate male child. It was stated that in September the dead body of a male child was found floating in a waterhole right opposite the house where the prisoner resided at East Geelong. The result of the police inquiries was that it had been ascertained that Miss Splatt, who now said that she had been married to a farm laborer named Peter Jennings a week since, had about eight mouths since gone to reside at Jennings’ house. According to the information of residents of East Geelong. Miss Splatt was two months ago to visit the Lying-in-Hospital in Melbourne, Miss Splatt returned to her house at East Geelong one night about nine o’clock with out any child, but she carried to the house a child’s cape and hat. She told the neighbours that she had been confined in the lying-in-hospital of a child, which died a few hours after its birth, but the police had evidence to show that Miss Splatt had a child In her arms when she arrived in Geelong. The authorities at the Lying-in- Hospital had informed the police that the young woman was confined with a male child in the institution. One of the women at the hospital told Constable Quilty that she saw the prisoner safely on board the steamer going to Geelong, and that she was then carrying a baby in her arms. A blanket and a flannel found on the body of the infant on the 10th September had been shown to the attendants at the hospital in Melbourne, and they identified the clothing as that given to a young woman who was going to Geelong with a child. The prisoner had admitted to the constable that she had been confined of a child, but said that it was a female. The prisoner, it would be proved, had been twice seen to walk round the water hole where the body of the child was discovered,and each time she had remained about the locality for about ten minutes. Mr Price said that the young woman had admitted that she had given birth to a child, but she had instructed him that it died before she left the hospital. He did not object to the remand, but asked that the prisoner should be admitted to bail. The young woman was married, and had to look after several children. The bench declined to allow the prisoner out on bail, and remanded the young woman to appear at the court, 4th October, to answer the charge of having murdered a male child.

 

ON THIS DAY – September 29, 1900

Edward Harrison, accused of murdering his paramour, Sarah Ann Johnson, at King- street, East Brunswick, on Saturday evening last, by cutting her throat, was before Messrs. J Manning and Stranks, J.P.’s at the local court yesterday. Sergeant Muldarry asked for a remand for a week. The prisoner did not speak. In court he looked the picture of wretchedness and dejection. He is a thin, undersized man, and had on a blue striped shirt, a very ragged brown coat, of which little more than the lining was left, tweed trousers, patched with moleskin at the knees. The bench remanded accused, to appear again before the court on Monday next.

On this day …….. 29th September 1940

On 29 September 1940, a mid-air collision occurred over Brocklesby, New South Wales, Australia. The accident was unusual in that the aircraft involved, two Avro Ansons of No. 2 Service Flying Training School RAAF, remained locked together after colliding, and then landed safely. The collision stopped the engines of the upper Anson, but those of the machine underneath continued to run, allowing the pair of aircraft to keep flying. Both navigators and the pilot of the lower Anson bailed out. The pilot of the upper Anson found that he was able to control the interlocked aircraft with his ailerons and flaps, and made an emergency landing in a nearby paddock. All four crewmen survived the incident, and the upper Anson was repaired and returned to flight service. The Ansons were at an altitude of 1,000 feet (300 metres) over the township of Brocklesby, near Albury, when they made a banking turn. Fuller lost sight of Hewson’s aircraft beneath him and the two Ansons collided amid what Fuller later described as a “grinding crash and a bang as roaring propellors struck each other and bit into the engine cowlings”. The aircraft remained jammed together, the lower Anson’s turret wedged into the other’s port wing root, and its fin and rudder balancing the upper Anson’s port tailplane. Both of the upper aircraft’s engines had been knocked out in the collision but those of the one below continued to turn at full power as the interlocked Ansons began to slowly circle. Fuller described the “freak combination” as “lumping along like a brick”. He nevertheless found that he was able to control the piggybacking pair of aircraft with his ailerons and flaps, and began searching for a place to land. The two navigators, Sinclair and Fraser, bailed out, followed soon after by the lower Anson’s pilot, Hewson, whose back had been injured when the spinning blades of the other aircraft sliced through his fuselage. Fuller travelled five miles (eight kilometres) after the collision, then successfully made an emergency pancake landing in a large paddock 6 kilometres (4 mi) south-west of Brocklesby. The locked aircraft slid 180 metres (200 yards) across the grass before coming to rest. As far as Fuller was concerned, the touchdown was better than any he had made when practising circuits and bumps at Forest Hill airfield the previous day. His acting commanding officer, Squadron Leader Cooper, declared the choice of improvised runway “perfect”, and the landing itself as a “wonderful effort”. The RAAF’s Inspector of Air Accidents, Group Captain Arthur “Spud” Murphy, flew straight to the scene from Air Force Headquarters in Melbourne, accompanied by his deputy Henry Winneke. Fuller told Murphy:

“Well, sir, I did everything we’ve been told to do in a forced landing—land as close as possible to habitation or a farmhouse and, if possible, land into the wind. I did all that. There’s the farmhouse, and I did a couple of circuits and landed into the wind. She was pretty heavy on the controls, though!”

 

On this day …….. 29th September 1853

Government Gazette this reward is offered for the apprehension of a prisoner of the Crown, who affected his escape from the Collingwood Stockade, on the morning of the 29th Sept. Personal description -Name, Thomas Quinn, ship to the Colony, Cadet, offence, robbery, age, twenty three years, height, five feet six inches, complexion, fresh, hair, dark brown, eyes, grey particular marks Mary Fanny, on his left arm, nine blue dots left thumb, star or cross above M right arm, date of conviction, 10th February 1853, sentence, seven years on the road’ Remarks – Married, wife and child in Melbourne opposite the Catholic Chapel.