Bluey was an Australia police drama series made by Crawford Production in Melbourne for the Seven Network. Which ran from the 2nd of August 1976 to the 25th of April 1977.

Stand-up comedian Lucky Grills was cast as the titular Det. Sergeant “Bluey” Hills.

Hills character was different to other detectives seen in Crawford’s previous shows. Being obese, heavily drinking, smoking, visited prostitutes, Hills character took on a life of its own.

Bluey was set at Melbourne’s Russell Street Police Headquarters, and many scenes were shot around South Melbourne.

“Bluey” Hills heading his own squad (“Department B”), due to his inability to work within the existing police squads.

Department B was given cases which the other departments could not solve by conventional means.  Hills applying his unconventional methods to bring about their resolution.

Bluey was supported in his investigations by newly assigned Det. Gary Dawson (John Diedrich) long-time cohort Sgt. Monica Rourke (Gerda Nicolson), and undercover officer Det. Sgt. Reg Truscott (Terry Gill), who spent his time ostensibly working as a small-time burglar, and supplying Bluey with information on the activities of local criminals. 

Unlike other Australian TV series at the time the entirely show shot on colour film.

The final episode “Son Of Bluey” featured an appearance by actor Don Barker as Det. Sgt. Harry White – the same character he played in Homicide television series.

Bluey found a new audience two decades later when the dubbed clips from the show formed the basis for the popular The Late Show comedy sketch “Bargearse”.

In addition to two guest appearances as himself, Grills also reprised his role as Bluey on The Late Show in order to protest the airing of the last Bargearse sketch.

Another enduring element from the show, the theme music, is now best associated with coverage of cricket from Nine Network’s Wide World of Sports.

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Blue Heelers is an Australian police drama series.  Produced by Southern Star Group and ran for 12 years on the Seven Network, from 1994 to 2006.

The series depicted the everyday lives and relationships of the residents of Mt Thomas (Williamstown), a fictional town in Victoria. The opening title sequence was filmed at Castlemaine, Victoria. 

The series focuses on the daily lives of police officers working at a police station in the fictional town of Mount Thomas.

Each episode is presented from the perspective of the officers.

On average, 42 episodes of Blue Heelers were broadcast per year on Australian television, with each episode comprising fifty scenes. One episode was made every week.

The scripts were written to a formula which allowed one day for rehearsal, two days on location and two days in the studio.  Episodes were shot eight to ten weeks ahead of their scheduled broadcast date.

Apart from the regular cast members, the show employed 4,300 guest actors annually, plus 30 extras every week. A total of 150 people were involved in the show’s production each week, including cast members, crew, wardrobe, publicists and writers.

Blue Heelers is regarded as one of the most successful programmes on Australian television.  Winning many awards, including 25 Logie Awards.  Blue Heelers was voted 37th greatest show on Australian television in the 50 Years 50 Show poll in 2005.

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A coincidence attended the landing at Grave Island in 1910, of a boat party from the steamer Wakefield, who were searching for the missing steamer Waratah. ⁣

Grave Island takes its name from the fact that several sailors are buried there. The boat party was in charge of the chief officer Mr. Thomas Ryan, of Dublin. Ryan was the first to approach the graves, and the first tomb stone that confronted him bore his own name, rank, and birthplace.

It had been erected in 1868 in memory of Thomas Ryan, a native of Dublin, and chief officer of the Elizabeth Jacques.⁣

 

Sarah Mullins, alias White, convicted of the manslaughter of William Kelly, was next brought up for sentence.

Mullins had stabbed Kelly in the thigh with a butchers knife after Kelly threw a stool at her when she refused to stop drinking beer.

His Honor said she had had a very narrow escape from the sentence of death, as it was quite open to the jury upon the evidence to have returned a verdict of guilty on the capital charge of murder.  He knew she was drunk, but that was no excuse at all, for he had often laid it down, that a prisoner who committed an offence whilst drunk must bear the full responsibility.

The jury had convicted her of manslaughter, but a recent act prevented him from passing a sentence of transportation, otherwise he should have felt it his duty to have done so. Various punishments had been provided in lieu of transportation, and his Honor thought he should be dealing leniently with the prisoner in sentencing her to the least period of imprisonment substituted for seven years transportation, which was two years. That sentence he accordingly passed.⁣

 

The Big Steal is an Australian caper film directed by Nadia Tass starring Ben Mendelsohn, Claudia Karvan and Steve Bisley.

David Parker was the scriptwriter and cinematographer. The film won three Australian Film Institute awards. The film was released on the 20th of September 1990. 

The movie was shot from the 6th of November to the 22nd of December 1989.

The film follows a young Danny Clark (Ben Mendelsohn) and his mates Mark Jorgensen (Damon Harriman) and Vangeli Petrakis (Angelo D’Angelo).

As the film unravels you find that there is only two things in life Danny wants more than anything else, one is a Jaguar car and the other is Joanna Johnson (Claudia Karvan).

On Danny’s 18th birthday his parents give him their beloved 1963 Nissan Cedric, which he trades for a A Jaguar XJ6.  Danny works up the courage to ask Joanna out on a date.  One problem is that he tells her that he owns a Jaguar. 

Danny finds a second hand car dealership owned by Gordon Farkas (Steve Bisley).

Spotting Danny admiring a used 1973 XJ6 in the lot, Farkas pounces and uses all his charm, cunning and every used-car salesman trick in the book to convince Danny that this is the car for him.

With the deal done and the Cedric gone, Danny heads home with his new pride and joy. But this is where things start to unravel.

His father is not impressed about losing the Cedric, and while out on his long-awaited date with Joanna, the Jag’s engine blows up.

Danny is shattered, particularly when he upsets Joanna and she leaves him stranded alone in the empty streets with a broken-down car.

Closer inspection reveals the engines had been swapped after Danny had signed the contract, with a dud motor put in his car.

Realising he has been done-over by the crooked Farkas, Danny and his mates hatch a plan to get revenge over the shonky car salesman and hopefully win back the hand of the lovely Joanna.

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