On this day …….. 7th of October 1910

Jack Carodini met his death on this day in 1910 in a lagoon near the Ovens River at Wangaratta, Victoria. In a drunken state, Carodini had cruelly beaten and stabbed his pony while riding home. In it’s death throes, the pony, still carrying Carodini, jumped into a lagoon, keeping it’s body on top of the rider until both were drowned.

 

On this day …….. 6th of October 1862

The first zoo to open in Australia was the Melbourne Zoo, which opened on this day in 1862. Modelled after the London Zoo, it featured formal Victorian-era gardens and just a few specimens of monkeys, as well as a limited display of native animals. The zoo began to change in character with the appointment of Albert le Souef as Director in 1870. He began to acquire a wider variety of exotic animals such as black bears, lions and tigers. As the zoo gained in popularity, the gardens were extended, more animals added and, in 1881, an entry fee introduced.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 4th October 1920

A man was taken from Birregurra to the Geelong Gaol on this day in 1920 for medical observation. He appeared before the Birregurra Court and as there was some doubt as to his sanity he was remanded and Constable Parmenter was sent up to bring him to Geelong. It is alleged that he obtained a horse, drove it to a standstill, and then flogged it with a heavy piece of wood. He is said to have obtained a second horse and after driving it for some distance cut about two inched off its tongue and almost severed the remaining portion of the tongue. When caught at Birregurra he made a statement that his horse had run into a barbed wire fence and so cut its tongue. An attempt was made by the police to interview him at the gaol, but his condition was too critical to permit questioning. The horse, which was a valuable one, had to be destroyed.

 

On this day …….. 3rd of October 1950

Arthur Walder from Narromine in New South Wales, was accidentally shot by his own dog while rabbit shooting on thus day in 1950. Walder, 23 was sitting in his parked truck 10km from town, when his dog jumped into the cabin and hit the trigger of his .22 riffle with his paw, firing it into Walder’s chest. Lucky for Walder’ his father was with him and was able to drive him to hospital, where he was flown to the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney.

 

On this day …….. 1st of October 1973

Ray Selkrig had a successful career as a jockey, but he will always be remembered for one race. Selkrig was riding Hot Chestnut at Kembla Grange, New South Wales, on this day in 1973 and was ahead by several length close to the finish line, when the horse was spooked by a patch on the ground, threw it’s rider out of the saddle. Selkrig clung to the reins and was dragged over the finish line by the horse. After an hour long enquiry, Selkrig was awarded the win. It was decided that the horse had carried it’s weight over the finish line.

 

On this day …….. 30th September 1939

Strange scenes were witnessed at Victoria Dock, when interstate buyers were so eager to secure pedigreed stud sheep that reached Melbourne from oversea that they wanted an auction sale on the wharf. This effort failed, but a sale was held in the city half an hour after the sheep were unloaded, and the first of them were sold before the sheep reached quarantine less than a mile from the dock. The consignment was brought to Australia by Mr. W. R. Ross, and was due in Melbourne nearly a fortnight earlier. Breeders from New South Wales, South Australia, and Victoria stormed the ship. A Dorset Horn that won the championship at the centennial English show was sold to a New South Wales breeder for 250 guineas.

 

 

On this day …….. 27th September 1919

The police of Bourke street West Watchhouse, Melbourne, vouch for this story about a cockatoo. Some months ago Mr Pearson, licensee of a South Melbourne hotel, reported the loss of the bird, which he valued at £50. On Friday a plain-clothes constable traced the bird to a house in Park street, Melbourne, and arrested a woman on a charge of having stolen it. Then Mr Pearson was invited to the watchhouse to identify the bird. What happened in actual fact was that cockatoo identified Mr Pearson. As Mr Pearson entered the room the bird immediately recognised his former owner, shrieking excitedly. The cockatoo cried out, Hullo, Pearson! Bring a whisky and soda for cocky,’ beating the sides of the cage in such a frenzy that the amazed police were prepared to believe that the bird had had one already that day.

 

27 September 1919 

The police of Bourke street West Watchhouse, Melbourne, vouch for this story about a cockatoo.

Some months ago Mr Pearson, licensee of a South Melbourne hotel, reported the loss of the bird, which he valued at £50.

On Friday a plain-clothes constable traced the bird to a house in Park street, Melbourne, and arrested a woman on a charge of having stolen.it.

Then Mr Pearson was invited to the watchhouse to identify the bird. What happened in actual fact was that cockatoo identified Mr Pearson. As Mr Pearson entered the room the bird immediately recognised his former owner, shrieking excitedly.

The cockatoo cried out, Hullo, Pearson! Bring a whisky and soda for cocky,’ beating the sides of the cage in such a frenzy that the amazed police were prepared to believe that the bird had had one already that day.

On this day …….. 26th September 2003

On the 26th September 2003, stationmaster Chris Gallagher was waiting fir the 3:12 pm train at Dunmore railway station, New South Wales, when a 50cm carp landed beside him. He believed it had been snatched from near by Swamp Road Lake by a sea eagle.

 

On this day …….. 25th September 2000

On the 25th of September 2000, 17-year-old Jevan Wright was killed while surfing at Blackfellows Point near Elliston on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia. During an inquest in February 2001 the Coroner stated “All experienced surfers, particularly people who surf on the West Coast of South Australia, must be aware of the risk, however remote, of shark attack.” The coroner’s report also noted that “Mr Geoff Wright, Jevan’s father, also made some very sensible observations about the frequency of shark attacks and ways in which this phenomenon might be minimised.” His observations related to tuna farming in Boston Bay and salmon fishing.

 

On This Day – September 22, 1831

On this day in 1831, George Moore drew and described a numbat after seeing one for the first time.

Moore was an early settler of Western Australia and had been involved in explorations of the region with Robert Dale.  It was on expedition in the Avon Valley that he would first sight the numbat.

He would say it the text accompanying the drawing “… chase another of those little animals into a hollowed tree, succeed in getting it, suppose it to be an ant eater from the length of its tongue & other reasons – its colour is yellowish barred with black & white streaks across the hinder parts of its back – length about 12 inches.”

On this day …….. 21st September 1946

On this day in 1946 at the Tipperary Station near the Adelaide River, Northern Territory, Arthur Crosbie the stations head stockman had shot a kangaroo though the hind leg with his riffle. As the animal lay on his back unable to move, Crosbie reloaded his riffle to shot it though the head, but decided that would be a waste of a bullet. Instead he put the butt of the riffle on the kangaroo’s neck to pin it down. While he was leaning over for a heavy stick nearby, the kangaroo reached up hooked it’s paw round the trigger and shot Crosbie through the right upper arm. Crosbie recovered in the Darwin hospital.