Well we might be a little bit late to the new year this year!!  But nevertheless Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!

In our defence we have been busy in the background finding and securing some new adventures for the Twisted History for this year, some we will be letting you know about very soon!  As well as busily providing ghost tours and paranormal investigations at Geelong Gaol and murder tours in Melbourne’s Chinatown.

Back to our blog!!  This year we will be doing things a little differently.  For the past couple of years we have been blogging snippets from history that happened “On This Day.  This year we will be doing “Sunday Spotlights” instead.  This will allow us to provide more details (where we can!) on some of the events we will be writing about.

But we would like your input!

As some of you would know we have a few different categories that we blog about – these include Murders, Goals, Hotels, Pop Culture and of course Twisted History.

This year we want to hear from you! Which Australian murder cases fascinate you?  Is there a particular Australian movie or TV show you want to know more about?  Is there an urban legend that gives you a chuckle?  Or even a good ghost story we haven’t heard?  Is your local hotel haunted?  Is there something paranormal you want to discuss?  We want to hear it all!

If you have some ideas for blog articles – get in touch!  You can email us at twistedhistoryvictoria@gmail.com, you can inbox us on any of our facebook pages or give us a call on 1300865800.

We do have some stories going up starting tonight and we look forward to hearing your thoughts!

Welcome to 2018!!

 

 

On This Day – December 17, 1942

Florence Maddalon aged 27, of South Yarra was found not guilty on a charge of having murdering her husband. Mrs Maddalon, collapsed on hearing the verdict of not guilty on the 17th December 1942. Her husband, Gulseppe Maddalon aged 40 was found fatally shot. She was also acquitted on a charge of manslaughter. Her defence was self defence.

 

ON THIS DAY – December 16, 1936

KALKALLO

MAN’S ARM IMPALED ON TRUCK DOOR DRIVER FACES MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE

While standing on the Hume Highway, near Kalkallo on December 16, Frances Lovell, aged 47 years, retired farmer, of South Yarra, had his arm impaled on the door handle of a passing motor truck and was dragged a mile and a quarter before the truck stopped, according to evidence given at the Coroner’s Court to-day, when the inquest was held into Lovell’s death. Lovell, it was stated, had been watching a friend attend to the radiator of his car. When the truck stopped he was dead. The coroner committed the driver of the truck, Hewitt Edwin Smith, of Yea, for trial on a charge of manslaughter. Smith, giving evidence, said he did not know that his truck was dragging Lovell, and he had no knowledge of the accident until a man waved to him to stop. Lovell, it will be recalled, was accompanying some friends to Wagga when the fatal accident occurred,

ON THIS DAY – December 5, 1953

Neville Read Hudson (29), dry cleaner, of Chirnside Avenue, Werribee, yesterday was sent from Geelong Coroner’s Court, for trial at the Supreme Court on a charge of manslaughter.  The inquest, conducted by Mr. Steedman. S.M., was into the deaths of Charles Maxwell Marshall (29), and Francis Henry Chandler (27), both of Werribee, who were passengers in a car driven by Hudson and which crashed into another car on Princess Highway near Waurn Ponds on December 5. 1952. Hudson was released on £300 bail

ON THIS DAY – December 5, 1915

In the Court of General Sessions on Tuesday Robert Poole, labourer, was charged with the manslaughter of Hugh Kelly, at Carlton, on December 5. The jury found accused not guilty, and he was discharged

ON THIS DAY – December 5, 1936

Giacomo Tarca (30), farm labourer. who was sentenced in Melbourne in March last to eight years’ imprisonment on a charge of manslaughter was deported on the Italian motor ship Romolo, which left Fremantle for Italy on Friday. Local interest in the case was increased by the fact that Tarca was arrested in Perth. Tarca was employed as a farm labourer by Luigi Marchesi, of Lilydale, Victoria. On November 1 last Marchesi disappeared, and on the following day Tarca left the farm. Marchesi’s charred and broken bones were found on the property on December 5, and on the night of December 10, following an intensive search through Victoria, South Australia and this State, Tarca was arrested as he stepped from a train at the Perth railway station. Tarca had been seen on the train when it left Fremantle, and the Perth detectives who were informed, boarded the train at Subiaco. to look for him. The accused man was subsequently sent back to Melbourne, where he stood his trial for the wilful murder of Marchesi, Detective McLennan, of Perth, going to Melbourne to give evidence. Tarca was eventually found guilty of manslaughter and the judge, in sentencing him to eight years’ imprisonment, remarked on the brutality of the case, and expressed the hope that the authorities would deport Tarca when an opportunity occurred. Tarca is a native of Mello, Northern Italy. He came to Australia in August, 1927, and after working for a short time in Fremantle, he went to Victoria, where he obtained work as a farm labourer.

ON THIS DAY – November 29, 1930

Dr. David Rosenberg, a well-known practitioner at Richmond, appeared at the Criminal Court on Friday, before the Chief Justice, having been committed from the Coroner’s Court on a charge of manslaughter, arising out of the death of a child, 5 1/2 years of age, named Ruby May Clementine Kerrison, daughter of John Ernest Kerrison, of Tennyson street, Richmond, such death, it being alleged, having resulted from accused’s negligent driving of a motor car. Mr T. C. Brennan prosecuted for the Crown, and Mr. G. A. Maxwell and Mr C. H. A. Eager appeared for the defence, The case for the prosecution was that at 5.30 p.m. on November 29 accused drove his car under the railway viaduct near the Richmond railway station at a speed of about 15 miles per hour. The roadway beneath the bridge is in deep shadow and the Crown contended that such a speed was it was said accused maintained at that point was highly dangerous to pedestrians. In this instance the child, whose parents live close at hand, was crossing the roadway and was knocked down. Accused was hailed by persons in the vicinity, and promptly pulled up, and took the child into a nearby chemist’s shop where he examined her, and rendered what immediate aid was possible, afterwards removing: her to the Children’s Hospital, where she died shortly after admission.  Accused giving evidence on own behalf, denied that he was driving at the rate alleged, and asserted that the car was travelling at only a moderate pace. There was very little traffic, and when his car. entered the shadow of the bridge he was able, by reason of the bright daylight at the exit, to see that he had clear passage. He did not see the child, and was unaware that an accident had occurred until he was hailed by some four passengers. When he examined the child he found that she had sustained an injury to her face and head, and he found, also, that the lamp bracket on the fore part of car was bent, indicating that it was that portion by which she was struck, There were no injuries indicative of the child having been run over by the wheels. Thomas Lowe, 10 years of age, said he witnessed the accident. The car was travelling at a moderate speed. The child when he first saw her, was standing on the kerb. As the car approached, she started to cross the road, hesitated when in the centre, and was knocked down. The jury, after half an hour’s retirement, returned a verdict of not guilty, adding a rider to the effect that it was desirable that at such dangerous points warnings to motorists should be placed. Accused was discharged, and his Honor intimated that the rider would be brought to the notice of the proper authorities.

On This Day – November 21, 1884

ECHUCA

On the 21st November 1884, a quarrel occurred between two men named Rogers and Michael Walsh, in front of the John Crown Hotel on Packenham street. Both were the worse of liquor and Rogers, who is a young athletic fellow, seized Walsh, an elderly man, and threw him over some railings dislocating his neck. Walsh was picked up dead shortly after, and Rogers was arrested.

 On This Day – November 20, 1902

In the Criminal Court to-day, before Mr. Justice Hood and a jury of 12, Emil Forsell, a young Norwegian sailor, was charged with having, on November 20 last, wilfully murdered Sophia Rigg, in Latrobe street west, near to Spencer street. An interpreter had to be sworn, as accused was not sufficiently acquainted with the English language. The evidence brought to prove the case for the Crown showed that deceased was on her way to visit her son, and was spoken to by her niece. Shortly afterwards accused was seen trying to commit an offence, and when interfered with the woman was dead. Death was caused by sudden and violent suffocation. A statement was made by the prisoner to the effect that he was so drunk that he did not know what he was doing, and he thought deceased was a woman with whom he had been in company with all day. Mr. Paul, counsel for the defence, submitted that the evidence was not clear that prisoner had caused the death of Mrs. Rigg, and that he way too drunk to know what he was doing. He asked the jury to return a verdict of manslaughter. Mr. Justice Hood said the authorities seemed to show that the conviction must be murder or nothing, and later, in addressing the jury on the point, said the law was not satisfactory in this. Juries, he pointed out, refused frequently to convict in cases of illegal operations, and persons who ought to be punished escaped. After the retirement of the jury an argument was heard whether the jury could convict for manslaughter, and Mr. Justice Hood said he would instruct the jury that they could do so, and reserve a case on the point for tho Full Court. The jury having been so instructed, almost immediately returned a verdict of not guilty of murder, but guilty of manslaughter, and accused was remanded for sentence, pending the decision of tha Full Court on the point reserved.

MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE

FITZROY

In the Criminal Court to-day Ernest Arthur Sims was charged with the manslaughter of Mary Maud Whitesides, at Fitzroy on November 19. Accused pleaded not guilty. Whitesides died from burns sustained at accused’s house. At the close of the Crown’s case Justice Hodges said that there was no clear evidence to go to the jury that deceased died from any act of the accused. By direction the jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and Sims was discharged.

ON THIS DAY…… 18th November 1879

One of Australia’s youngest bushrangers, a fifteen-year-old member of Captain Moonlite’s gang, is shot and killed.

Augustus Wernicke was one of Australia’s youngest bushrangers, and part of Captain Moonlite’s gang. Captain Moonlite, aka Andrew George Scott, became a bushranger upon his release from gaol, eight years after robbing the bank at Mount Egerton, Victoria. He recruited several other gang members, among them 15-year-old Wernicke, and walked to New South Wales, hoping to find employment at Wantabadgery Station, well known for its hospitality. Being in the grip of a severe drought, and also having changed hands, Wantabadgery could offer them nothing. In desperation, Moonlite took 35 people hostage. In the resultant shootout with police on 18 November 1879, gang members James Nesbitt and Augustus Wernicke, together with Constable Bowen, were all shot dead. Moonlite and the surviving gang members were tried and charged with the murder of Constable Bowen. Moonlite himself was hanged on 20 January 1880 at Darlinghurst Court.

ON THIS DAY – November 17, 1889

Constable Coffey on Friday night arrested a man named John Caffrey on a charge of wilfully murdering Ah Gayong in Market-lane on November 17. It will be remembered that the Chinaman was killed by a couple of roughs who attacked him without any provocation.