NORTH MELBOURNE

OLD AGE PENSIONER CHARGED WITH MURDER

As a sequel to an altercation in Peel Street, North Melbourne, Edward Thomas James (72), old age pensioner, was charged in the City Court to-day with having murdered Harold Frederick Swanston. on November 22. He was remanded for a week.

ON THIS DAY – November 22, 1907

The trial of Thos. Treloar on the charge of murdering Mrs. Mary Patterson at Albert Park on November 22 last by hitting her on the head with an iron bar, was concluded to-day. The jury returned a verdict of guilty, with a strong recommendation to mercy. The accused was sentenced to death. The reason for the recommendation was that the jury were unable to decide whether Treloar was insane when he committed the deed, or whether he did it in a fit of passion. His Honor promised to forward the recommendation to the Executive Council.

ECHUCA

On the 21st November 1884, a quarrel occurred between two men named Rogers and Michael Walsh, in front of the John Crown Hotel on Packenham street. Both were the worse of liquor and Rogers, who is a young athletic fellow, seized Walsh, an elderly man, and threw him over some railings dislocating his neck. Walsh was picked up dead shortly after, and Rogers was arrested.

JANEVALE

A man named James McKenna has was taken into custody by the police of Tarnagalla, on a charge of being concerned in the death of a woman believed to be his wife, found dead on the read near Janevale on the 21st November 1884. The body was covered with blood and the skull was fractured.

 

CARLTON

HOTEL BRAWL

George Kelland, aged 37, was charged at the Carlton Police with the wilful murder of Henry John Morris, laborer, as the result of a fight. The accused admitted to Constable Aheolem that he had knocked the deceased out. Kellands bail was refused.

Thank you to the group who joined me in Chinatown this evening!  Although we got off to a shaky start with our first alleyway otherwise occupied, you survived your journey to the dark side!!  ~ Madam

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MANSLAUGHTER BY A SAILOR.

MELBOURNE

In the Criminal Court to-day, before Mr. Justice Hood and a jury of 12, Emil Forsell, a young Norwegian sailor, was charged with having, on November 20 last, wilfully murdered Sophia Rigg, in Latrobe street west, near to Spencer street. An interpreter had to be sworn, as accused was not sufficiently acquainted with the English language. The evidence brought to prove the case for the Crown showed that deceased was on her way to visit her son, and was spoken to by her niece. Shortly afterwards accused was seen trying to commit an offence, and when interfered with the woman was dead. Death was caused by sudden and violent suffocation. A statement was made by the prisoner to the effect that he was so drunk that he did not know what he was doing, and he thought deceased was a woman with whom he had been in company with all day. Mr. Paul, counsel for the defence, submitted that the evidence was not clear that prisoner had caused the death of Mrs. Rigg, and that he way too drunk to know what he was doing. He asked the jury to return a verdict of manslaughter. Mr. Justice Hood said the authorities seemed to show that the conviction must be murder or nothing, and later, in addressing the jury on the point, said the law was not satisfactory in this. Juries, he pointed out, refused frequently to convict in cases of illegal operations, and persons who ought to be punished escaped. After the retirement of the jury an argument was heard whether the jury could convict for manslaughter, and Mr. Justice Hood said he would instruct the jury that they could do so, and reserve a case on the point for tho Full Court. The jury having been so instructed, almost immediately returned a verdict of not guilty of murder, but guilty of manslaughter, and accused was remanded for sentence, pending the decision of tha Full Court on the point reserved.

A VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER.

FOOTSCRAY

Mrs. Ellen McNabb. a young woman, was placed on trial at the Criminal Court today for the murder of her infant child at Footscray on November 20. The jury returned a verdict of manslaughter but strongly recommended the accused mercy on account of the provocation she had received.

The Chief Justice in passing sentence found the prisoner had been deserted by a villainous husband, who did not care what became of her or the child.  She had been illtreated and starved by her husband.  He would give full weight to the recommendation.  The prisoner was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment.

MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE

FITZROY

In the Criminal Court to-day Ernest Arthur Sims was charged with the manslaughter of Mary Maud Whitesides, at Fitzroy on November 19. Accused pleaded not guilty. Whitesides died from burns sustained at accused’s house. At the close of the Crown’s case Justice Hodges said that there was no clear evidence to go to the jury that deceased died from any act of the accused. By direction the jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and Sims was discharged.

YOUNG MAN CHARGED.

Richard Clarence Skinner, 21, of South Melbourne, was arrested on a charge with having at Bacchus Marsh on November 19, with intent to murder, Arthur Edwards, a farm hand, of Balwyn. He had a severe wound on the chin and was unable to speak. By writing answers to questions by the detectives Edwards stated he had been shot while entering a car on the Ballarat Road sit Bacchus Marsh.

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YOUTH CHARGED WITH MANSLAUGHTER

Reginald Charles Burrows, 18- year-old sheet metal worker, of Percy st, West Brunswick, was committed for trial on a charge of manslaughter by Mr Burke, SM, city coroner, yesterday.

Mr Burke conducted an inquest into the death of Rupert Francis Bowd, 36, of Evans st, East Brunswick, who died in Royal Melbourne Hospital on November 18. Police alleged that Burrows went to Brunswick railway platform and fought with Bowd after Burrows’ sisters had told him that Bowd had behaved offensively towards them. During the fight Bowd fell on to the railway line and suffered injuries from which he died later.