ON THIS DAY – July 28, 1934

After having heard evidence at an inquest today into the death of a newly-born male child, whose body was found by a railway employee while cleaning out a carriage at the Joilmont yards on July 28. The coroner (Mr. Grant) committed Edith Clyne, aged 20, formerly a nurse employed at the Queen’s Memorial Hospital, Fairfield, for trial at the Supreme Court on a charge of murder.

ON THIS DAY – July 28, 1936

 

Charged with having murdered his twin sister, Adelaide Bek, on July 28, Charles Bek, farmer, of Kooroocheang, was remanded at the Ballarat City Court to day until August 28. It was alleged that Bek had an altercation with his sister, struck her several blows on the head with a hammer and threw her body into a dam on his farm. He was arrested last night. The body was recovered from the dam on August 14. Bek is little more than five foot high, and is slightly built.

ON THIS DAY – July 27, 1947

A slim, blue-eyed blonde, smartly dressed in a light brown coat, Dulcie Markham, of Fawkner Street, St. Kilda, appeared in the City Court this morning charged with conspiracy to murder. It was alleged that at St. Kilda on July 31, she conspired with Ernest Alfred James Markham to murder Valma Edith Hull, wife of Keith Kitchener Hull, who was wounded in St. Kilda on July 27. Mr. J. Galbally, who appeared for Dulcie Markham said she went voluntarily to Russell Street on Saturday and said, “If there is any charge, I am here to answer it.” Mrs. Markham was remanded to the St. Kilda Court on August 15. Bail was fixed at £300, with a £300 surety.

ON THIS DAY – July 27, 1924

At the Detective Office yesterday afternoon a telephone message was received from the Benalla police, stating that the body of Miss Bridget Enwright, who has been missing, from her home at Staghorn Flat since July 27, was found partly covered with clay, at Staghorn Flat, in circumstances indicating foul play (says a Melbourne message in the “News”). A detective has been dispatched to investigate the matter.

Miss Enwright (as briefly reported in yesterday’s “Miner”) was 69 years of age, and lived alone on her farm, which is in the Yackandandah district, and ís 198 miles from Melbourne. Her prolonged absence from home caused concern among residents, and search parties were organised to examine the surrounding country. Until yesterday morning their efforts were unsuccessful. At one time 50 mounted men were searching. Miss Enwright was seen talking to a young man about two miles from her home on July 27, and though she is believed to have returned to the house she was not again seen alive. Two weeks ago, however, a constable from Kiewa and local residents visited her home, and found signs that a robbery had been committed. The back door was unlocked, and one of the bedrooms was in disorder. Among other things discovered were an empty purse and handbag. In the house, however, there were no signs of struggle.

ON THIS DAY – July 27, 1932

Walter Henderson. (48), farmer, was charged late today with having on July 27, at Albert Park murdered his mother Mrs Sarah Henderson.

MURDER CHARGE FAILS.

The third trial of Walter William Henderson 47, farmer, on a charge of having murdered his mother at their home at Albert Park on July 27, was concluded in the Criminal Court to-night. The Jury found Henderson not guilty and he was discharged. Soon after his acquittal Henderson was arrested on a charge of bigamy.

ON THIS DAY – July 26, 1933

 

At the inquest into the death of Katherine Dorman, 24, machinist, on July 26, following an attack and injuries inflicted with an iron pipe while in her bedroom at Windsor the Coroner found John Boles murdered her and ordered a warrant for his arrest after hearing the evidence of Miss Dorman’s land-lady, Mrs. Nellie Burke, that Boles had repeatedly hit Dorman over the head with the pipe. Boles, who is a married man left a letter saying that he had lost his employment, which meant his means for getting a divorce had gone. This seemed to unhinge his overstrung nerves and then he simply wanted to die and take the dear girl with him.

EXECUTED THIS DAY – July 26, 1859

 

Richard Rowley, who was sentenced to death at the Supreme Court on the 18th instant, for a violent and premeditated assault, with intent to murder, committed by him on Denis Kilmartin, one of the overseers at the Pentridge Stockade, on the 25th of June, suffered the extreme penalty of the law at 10 o’clock yesterday morning at the Melbourne Gaol.  The unhappy man, since his conviction has been attended by the Rev. Mr. Studdert, the Gaol Chaplain, and the Rev. Mr. Bryan, the Chaplain at Pentridge. He expressed a deep contrition for the offence of which he was found guilty, and at the last moment died penitent. On being summoned by the Sheriff from his cell, precisely at 10 o’clock, he walked out, pale, but with a firm step. His arms having been pinioned by the executioner, the mournful procession walked slowly down the passage towards the scaffold, the Burial Service being read by Mr. Bryan. Rowley mounted the steps leading to the drop without hesitation or apparent fear; he had evidently braced his nerves and summoned all his resolution to meet his impending fate with firmness. On reaching the drop he knelt and prayed. When he rose his countenance was blanched, but apparently not from terror at the dreadful apparatus of death on which he stood. He turned round to his minister, and bade him good-by, and then, noticing the Governor of the Gaol, said, “Goodby, Mr. Wintle.” These were the last words he uttered. A white cap was then drawn down tightly over his face, and a few moments later — the only sound now heard being the solemn voice of the clergyman repeating the service for the dead—the bolt was drawn, and the wretched man was launched into eternity. A slight convulsive shudder ran through his frame, and in a few moments he ceased to live, death taking place in 42 seconds from the time of his fall. He was cut down at 11 o’clock. Shortly afterwards, an inquest was held on the body by the City

The deceased was a native of Greenwich, and was born in 1824. At 13 years of age, having been tried and convicted of a robbery, committed by him in London, he was transported to Van Diemen’s Land for a period of seven years. He has since repeatedly been sentenced to various terms of imprisonment in this colony for numerous thefts. At the time of his committing the offence which has led to his execution he was confined in the Pentridge Stockade under cumulative sentences, altogether making a term of 32 years’ imprisonment. It would seem to be the knowledge of this fact, and despair of ever regaining his liberty, which led him to the commission of the deed for which he suffered. The unhappy man stated that he had been brutally ill-treated by his overseer Kilmartin, at the Stockade. There do not, however, appear to be any grounds for supposing such a statement to be correct, and it will also be remembered that Rowley made this statement in a moment of great excitement at his trial, but he never subsequently alluded to it in calmer moments. Kilmartin was frightfully injured in the desperate affray, in which also Mr. Mitchell, another overseer, was severely wounded by the wretched criminal.

ON THIS DAY – July 26, 1943

Giving evidence in his defence on a charge of murdering Pearl Oliver at Fitzroy on July 26, Harold Nugent, truck-driver, said in the Criminal Court today that he did not shoot the girl and did not have a weapon of any sort in his possession. Nugent said he was driving two other men to St. Kilda when, in Fitzroy. He saw Joseph Fanesi, a drinking acquaintance, with a girl and an American sailor. He stopped and asked Fanesi to have a drink with him. Fanesi declined, but as Nugent was walking back to the car, he heard two shots and saw Fanesi fall. He then saw his companion, Leslie Brown, and the sailor fighting. Brown joined him in the car and they drove away. He did not know the girl was shot until he read it in the paper the next day.

ON THIS DAY – July 25, 1942

Following exhaustive inquiries, detectives arrested and charged Frederick Francis Green, 32, timber worker of Lygon Street, Carlton, with the murder of Mrs. Catherine, Whitley, 65, in a lane off Elizabeth Street, city, on July 25. Mrs. Whitley was discovered unconscious in the lane on July 25 and died two days later, from a fractured skull.

EXECUTED THIS DAY – July 25, 1855

James McAllister, convicted at the last Criminal Sessions of the murder of Jane Jones, a woman with whom he formerly cohabitated, was executed at the Melbourne Gaol. About 500 persons were present outside the gaol to witness the execution. McAllister was transported out to Van Diemans Land in 1842 being then about fourteen or fifteen years of age.

ON THIS DAY – JULY 25, 1916

Antoine Picone the Italian who shot and killed Joseph Luricella, a compatriot, in Queen Victoria Market on July 25, was hanged in Melbourne Gaol. Picone had been attended until the last minute by Father J. Donovan, and when led on to the scaffold carried his hand a small photograph and a paper containing a lock of hair. He asked that they might be buried with him. The sheriff promised him the request would be granted, and then asked him if he had anything further to say. Picone said something in a low, inaudible tone. The lever was then released, Death was instantaneous. Luricella was shot through the head with an automatic revolver as the result of a quarrel with Picone. The tragedy occurred in the early morning.

ON THIS DAY – July 24, 1884

The adjourned inquest on the body of Peter M’Ansh who was found shot dead near the Boundary-road Hotel, Lancefield on July 24 was resumed yesterday. William O’Brien, who is charged with the murder, was present in custody today. Jeremiah O’Brien, his son, in custody as an accessory, was discharged and put in the witness box. The evidence showed that O’Brlen had ill-feeling against M’Ansh, who occupied land formerly owned by O’Brien. Circumstantial proof strongly pointed that O’Brien fired the fatal shot. The inquest was adjourned until today.