ON THIS DAY …….6th August 1938

After a retirement of four hours a jury in the Criminal Court found Edward Allan May aged 30, laborer, not guilty of having murdered Mrs. Yoland Joan Shirley Bordin aged 21, of Carlton, but guilty of manslaughter. He was remanded for sentence after having admitted to prior convictions, including a gaol sentence of five years for armed assault with intent to rob. Mrs. Bordin, who was living apart from her Italian husband, was found bleeding to death from a knife wound at Carlton early on this day in 1938. Some distance away was a long-bladed hunting knife.

ON THIS DAY …….6th August 1955

Domenic “Mick” Gatto was born on the 6th of August 1955. Mick is an Italian-Australian man widely suspected to be involved in the Melbourne underworld. Gatto is a ‘professional mediator’ within the building industry in Melbourne. He runs a company, Arbitrations and Mediations Pty Ltd and has an interest in the crane company, Elite Cranes. In 2004 Mick Gatto was charged with the murder of suspected underworld hitman Andrew Veniamin and remanded in custody for 18 months. He was found not guilty at trial, during which Gatto claimed he had acted in self-defence after Veniamin pulled out a .38 and threatened to kill him. Gatto claims that during a struggle he was able to turn the gun around on Veniamin and fire one shot into his neck, and one shot in the eye. He also claimed that during the argument, Veniamin had implicated himself in the deaths of Dino Dibra, Paul Kallipolitis and Graham Kinniburgh.

On This Day ……. 6th of August 1873

The notorious Emily Green, who for some time past has been diverting herself at Ballarat by getting drunk and uncontrollable, and destroying Government property when incarcerated, has again visited this town. Last evening she was found by Constable Digby, near the top of Yarra street, in the centre of a numerous group of boys and men, and apparently suffering from a fit. The constable speedily defined the cause of her illness, but although a cab was procured it was only with the utmost difficulty she was conducted to the watch house, where she subsequently made the ells melodious, before being taken to the Geelong a Gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY …….5th August 1947

Twin brothers were in the City Court on this day in 1947, one charged with attempted murder and the other with having conspired to murder. The charge followed the shooting of Keith Kitchener Hull, at St. Kilda on the 27th of July. The men are Charles Martin (26), of St. Kilda, who faced the charge of attempting to murder Hull, and Ernest Alfred James Martin, of South Yarra. who was charged with having conspired to murder Mrs. Thelma Hull, on the 30th of July.  George Barrett (34), of St. Kilda, was also charged with having attempted to murder Hull. Bail was refused on the attempted murder charge, but Ernest Martin was allowed bail. Detective H. R. Donnelly, in evidence, said that Hull would not tell the police who shot him. The accused were remanded to August 12.

On this day …….. 5th of August 1898

A boy named Watts was crossing a paddock on Oliver Anketell’s farm near Dandenong, Victoria, on this day in 1898 when a large eagle swooped down and grabbed his dog, burying it’s talons in to it’s back. The bird rose in the air with the dog before the boy could come to the rescue. The dog howled in pain as it struggled in vain attempts to free it’s self. They were high in the air before the dog managed to catch it’s captor’s wings and hold on. The eagle used it’s beak with terrible effects, but the dog instinctively kept it’s hold on the wing, and the pair, tumbling over and over as they fell to the ground. The boy ran to his dog’ said and managed to kill the eagle by bludgeoning it to death with heavy blows to the head from his stout walking stick. The dog was alive but badly injured around the head and body from attacks by the birds claws and beak. The eagle measured two metres from tip to tip of it’s wings. The dog which weighted about 10kg made a good recovery.

 

ON THIS DAY …….5th August 1946

Bleeding from extensive knife wounds in the forearm, John Kickert, 65, Dutchman, staggered into a confectionery shop at Fairfield at 8pm, on this day in 1946, and slumped into a chair and died. The main arteries in Kickert’s arm had been severed and apparently he bled to death. As he entered the shop, Kickert produced a knife with a 16-inch razor-like blade and said to the proprietress, Mrs. Valda Wild, ‘Look, Miss.’ Police followed the trail of blood from the shop for more than 300 yards to a house in Gillies Street, where Kickert lived with his wife and daughter. They found the house in disorder. Every window in the house had been smashed, and there was evidence a violent struggle. They were told a quarrel had occurred between Kickert and a man. , Kickert had called at Mrs. Wild’s shop at 6.45pm. He was then bleeding from face and head injuries, arid alleged he had been beaten’ up. He asked Mrs. Wild to telephone, the police, and two con constables came to the shop. They then accompanied Kickert back to his home,, and police, thinking there would be no further trouble, left Kickert at the house. Later police were told that there was another quarrel in which Kickert received the death wound. Police are searching for a man.

 

ON THIS DAY …….5th August 1941

Ratcliff Lawson, aged 51 years, from Essendon, and his son, Peter, aged 20 years, were found dead on this day 1941, in a gas filled motor car at Kangaroo Ground, 25 mile, from Melbourne. Police believe that it is a case of murder and suicide. The father had a deep affection for his son, who was a patient in a mental hospital.

 

 

On this day …….. 5th of August 1938

CENTENARIAN’S PARTY

Mrs. Isabel Munro, aged 104 years, of Fitzroy, believed to be the oldest woman in Victoria, went to a party last Friday night. She returned to her home at 2.30 a.m. and at 11 o’clock she complained to a visitor that she was being kept in bed. ‘They say it’s cold,’ she said, ‘but I’m not cold, and I’m not tired. I’d sooner get up. I like
to get up at 6.40. Her daughter Mrs. McIntyre, with whom she lives, said that her mother had never had a serious illness, and did not suffer from headache, ear
ache or toothache. She is eligible for toothache, however, as three new teeth appeared about six years ago.

 

On This Day ……. 5th of August 1880

Two larrikins named William Worzeldine and Walter Daniels were charged at the police court on this day in 1880, with being found in a public place with intent to commit a felony. There was a second charge of vagrancy. Sergeant O’Hare stated that about 10 o’clock on the evening of the 29th of July, he observed the prisoners loitering about in a suspicious manner, and then go up the lane at the rear of Messrs. Bright and Hitchcock’s establishment. He followed them, and arrested Daniels, and Worzeldine was afterwards found in an empty packing case behind the drapery shop. He had not known the prisoners do anything for a living. Mr. Cakebread stated that on the 28th ult., his office was broken into. On the morning of the 29th he found a blank cheque on his desk with the word “bearer” written on it by one of the robbers. Sergeant O’Hare stated that he got Daniels to write the word “bearer,” and the writing was similar to that on the blank cheque. Worzeldine, in defence, stated that he was in the employment of a night man when he was arrested, and always earned an honest livelihood. Daniels made no defence. Worzeldine was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment, and Daniels to nine months’, in the Geelong Gaol.

 

On this day …….. 5th of August 1944

The Cowra breakout occurred on 5 August 1944, when at least 1,104 Japanese prisoners of war attempted to escape from a prisoner of war camp near Cowra, in New South Wales, Australia. It was the largest prison escape of World War II, as well as one of the bloodiest. During the ensuing manhunt, 4 Australian soldiers and 231 Japanese soldiers were killed. The remaining escapees were captured and imprisoned.

 

On This Day ……. 4th of August 1884

A woman who wrested with a male named Oswald Brown, at Warrnambool on this day in 1884, was lodged in the Geelong gaol, to await the hearing of the charge against her at the Police Court. The man, who was also brought to Geelong, was
afterwards taken to Ballarat, to account for a buggy and pair of horses which, it is
alleged, he hired in that city and never returned. He has also to appear in Geelong
to perform a similar mission, the carriage and pair having been taken from the stables of Cobb and Co.

 

ON THIS DAY …….4th August 1863

A dreadful murder was perpetrated at Warrnambool on this day in 1863, by a prisoner called James Murphy, on a Constable named Daniel O’Boyle. The murder was committed in the Court house, while O’Boyle was stooping down it is presumed to light the fire in the room of the Clerk of Petty Sessions, Murphy struck the deceased, while in the stooping posture indicated, a blow on the right side of the head with a heavy stone hammer, which caused immediate insensibility—of which the prisoner took advantage in making his escape. O’Boyle who had just completed his 27th birthday only survived the attack twenty-two hours. The Warrnambool papers state that Murphy has been since apprehended, and is now lodged in the Geelong Gaol awaiting his trial for the murder.

Murphy was executed in the Geelong Gaol, the hangman William Bamford was an old mate and fellow convict ……… Could you hang your mate?