Big Girl’s Blouse is an Australian skit program that aired on the 13th of October 1994 on the Seven Network.

The show was created by Gin Riley, Jane Turner and Magda Szubanski who all went on to star in Kath and Kim. The show ran for one season with 9 half-hour episodes. 

The phrase “Big Girl’s Blouse” is a British English idiom meaning “ineffectual or weak, someone failing to show masculine strength or determination”.

Riley, Szubanski and Turner had all become recognisable faces from their time on sketch series Fast Forward, the creation of Steve Vizard and Andrew Knight.

Amidst the largely male team of comedians writing and appearing in the series, the trio (along with Marg Downey) had some of the most memorable characters and sketches, but it wasn’t until they were given their own series in 1994 that they carved out their own voice — the subtly subversive voice that would go on to be at the core of Kath and Kim.

The three comedians had to work hard to convince Vizard and Knight to give them their own special on Channel Seven, which was eventually turned into a series.

That series struggled in the ratings — it was scheduled up against the first season of ER — so was cancelled after just one season.

But the eight episodes were released on DVD in the early 2000s (after Kath and Kim became popular) and many of the sketches and characters have taken on a cult following thanks to YouTube.

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au

On Monday the 24th of May 1965, Humphrey B. Bear an icon of Australian children’s television was first broadcast on Adelaide’s NWS-9.

The show became one of the most successful programs for pre-schoolers in Australia. The part of Humphrey was played by Edwin Duryea, an actor, singer and dancer whose human identity was never revealed.  In the early days the character was known as Bear Bear and was named Humphrey B. Bear as the result of an on air competition.

The ‘B’ in Humphrey B Bear stands for Bear, but this has rarely been acknowledged on air.⁣

During the morning of May 19, 1905, Mrs. Tierney, who lived with her husband at his farm at Gymbowen, complained of a feeling of weakness and the loss of the use of her legs. Not much importance was attached to the attack, as in a few hours, Mrs. Tierney was well again, and performed her household duties as usual. During the afternoon the same feeling came over her, this time accompanied by twitchings of the body. ⁣

Her husband drove her to Dr R. K. Bird, of Natimuk, who examined her. When questioned by the doctor she stated that she had partaken of some tart for breakfast. Portions of the tart had a bitter taste, and the tea she had at that meal also had a bitter taste. The doctor suggested that some poison was in the tart and advised her not to eat anymore of it. Mrs. Tierney by this time had quite recovered, and with her husband drove home the following morning. ⁣

In the evening Mr. Tierney killed a sheep, and his wife, who had been watching him, went towards the house, but when she had gone about 50 yards she collapsed. Her husband ran to her assistance, and she died in his arms. Miss Bertram, who was employed as a domestic servant in the Tierney family, also complained of feeling ill after breakfast, but after vomiting she recovered.⁣

Mrs Tierney had only been married for 2 months and was a well loved teacher in the area.  Her friend and domestic, Mary Bertram was arrested for the death but was later discharged due to no evidence indiciating she was involved. ⁣

 

Bellbird is an Australian soap opera serial set in a small Victorian rural township. The series was produced by the ABC at its Ripponlea TV studios in Elsternwick, Melbourne. The opening title sequence was filmed at Daylesford, Victoria. 

The series was produced between the 28th of August 1967 and the 23rd of December 1977.

Although not the first Australian soap opera it was the first successful soap opera and even spanned a feature film and tie-in novel. The show’s ratings were modest but it had a devoted following, especially in rural Australia. 

The show followed the lives of people living in the fictional town of Bellbird. 

During its 10-year production run, 15-minute episodes of Bellbird screened from Monday through to Thursday nights during the lead in to the 7 pm evening news bulletin.

In 1976 the series was screened as one one-hour episode each week, before switching to three half-hour installments per week during its final season.

The series was the first soap opera in Australia to spin-off into a feature film version and tie-in novel, entitled Country Town (1971), it focused on Bellbird’s problems during a severe drought. The movie’s script was also novelized. 

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Former prime minister and world beer dinking record breaker, Bob Hawke has died at the age of 89.

The Labor legend died in his Sydney home today just two days before the May 18 federal election.

Hawke, arguably one of the most popular prime ministers in Australian history, is survived by his wife Blanche d’Alpuget, and children Susan, Stephen and Rosslyn.

Hawke was the third longest running Prime Minister in Australian history behind Sir Robert Menzies and John Howard.

A down to earth, approachable Prme Minister who was immortalised by the Guinness Book of Records in 1954 for sculling 2.5 pints of beer in 11 seconds.

This record was at the same English Hotel where President Bill Clinton smoked a joint.

Ernst Schneider, 83, who died at Dubbo, NSW,  in 1943, completed some years ago all arrangements for his funeral.

He selected the casket, and even engraved .the nameplate for his own coffin. The undertaker had only to insert the date of his death.

“He was more concerned with the hereafter than this world,” said a friend who knew him well.⁣

 

Donald Maxfield was reported missing from Colac on the 13th of May, 1953. On the 1st of August 1953, the torso of a man was pulled from the Barwon River. Divers would eventually find the rest of Maxfield’s body, which had been dismembered and placed in kerosene tins and sunk in the Barwon River. ⁣

It was believed the Maxfield was attacked and bashed in a garage in Colac by two men. The men had placed the unconscious body of Maxfield in the boot of a car and had driven to Geelong. Maxfield regained consciousness and was again bashed to death on the banks of the Barwon. It was reported that this was a payback as it was believed that Maxfield had been a police informant against one of the men.⁣

The two men would later be arrested and information from them would lead to finding the rest of Maxfields body by divers recovering the torso after a 5 hour search of the river. The torso had been covered in an oat sack, wrapped in wire and weighed down with stone weights so that it was roughly 100lbs. The head and hands were later discovered in kerosene tins in the river. ⁣

Both men were charged with murder and sentenced to life imprisonment and 20 years respectively.⁣

Bendigo Advertiser
4 January 1887

Referring to the recent murderous assault by a daughter upon her mother at Horsham, the “Horsham Times” says that a man named Clarke had been living with a woman named Emma Marquadt, who passed as his wife, and her daughter, Mary, aged sixteen years.

The Attack

On Wednesday afternoon, when going into his house after leaving his work, he found his paramour lying on a bod, having been assaultod about the head and body in a horrible manner by an axe, and the girl, her daughter, bathing the wounds. The woman was senseless, or so nearly so that she could not give any account of the matter, her daughter, upon being questioned, said she knew nothing whatever of it, but that she had been up into town to make some purchases, and returned with the articles she had bought, when all was right she went out again, and on her return the second time found her mother lying on the floor weltering in her blood from the wounds, and an axe lying beside her.

Dr C. Pardy was immediately sent for, and information conveyed to the police. When the former arrived he found the woman speechless and in a very dangerous state, but did what be could to afford relief to the sufferer.

Police Interview

On the police interviewing the girl she persistently adhered to her original story for a length of time, but the officers were not satisfied, and Sub-inspector O’CalLaghan, Sergeant Lirkan, Constables M’Bride and Cameron continued their inquiries apparently to little purpose, until at length the wavering of the girl’s story caused suspicion to turn towards herself, and culminated in her making a clean breast of it to Sergeant Larkan yesterday morning, when, of course, she was immediately arrested, and conveyed to the lockup.

Her storythen was that she went into tho town between 1 and 2 o’clock and made her purchases, and returned to the house, and afterwards, when sitting on an inner step in a doorway in the room, her mother and she had some words, and then she went out into the yard, got the axe, brought it unobserved, and struck her mother several blows from behind, causing the gashes in her head and ab0ut her body, there evidently being some six or eight blows struck. The woman, it seems, struggled to get up, and exclaimed “What have I done to you that you would do this to me!” and the girl replied “I’ll tell you by-and-bye.”

The woman seems then to have staggered to the bed on which she was found, with the assistance of the girl, who then proceeded to wipe up the blood on the floor, and bathe the wounds of the injured woman, at which she was observed when the horrible discovery was made.

Accusation

When questioned as to what led her to commit such an act, the girl informed Sergeant Larkan that it was because the man Clark had taken advantage of her,the consequence being that she was encainte by him. On being asked if she would repeat this statement in the presence of Clarke she replied in the affirmative, and on his being called in she reasserted several times, but it is only fair to add that Clark absolutely denied it.

The girl was presented at tho Police court before Messers Cameron and Bolton, JPs, when she was charged with ” wounding with intent to murder.” The prisoner, who has hard set features, conducted herself in the coolest manner possible, apparently not realising the awful position in which she stood.

Police Court

At the police court, before Mr Hutchinson, the policn magistrate, the girl Mary Marquardt was charged with assaulting her mother, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm. A more serious charge of intent to murder was withdrawn. Several witnesses were examined, from whose evidence it appeared as if the girl assaulted her mother with an axe, but the main evidence in that of her own confession to the man Clark and the police. She made no statement of any kind in court. She was committed for trial at the General Sessions in February.

On the 15th September 1904, an accident occurred in Elizabeth Street where Sarah Ann
Robins, her husband James and her 27 year old daughter, Rosina Hubbard, who was
described as a dwarf, were thrown from a cart. This accident set in a motion a series of
events that would leave only James still alive 12 months later.

Nursed by her Daughter

Sarah required attention for her injuries, and was nursed at home by her daughter,
Rosina. However doctors became concerned by her unusual symptoms and engaged a
nurse to assist the family in caring for her. Sarah continued to decline and was admitted
to the Melbourne Hospital.

Nurse Flower, who had been engaged to look after Sarah before she was admitted to
hospital, deposed at the inquest that she witnessed Rosina administer some medicine to
her mother. When the nurse rinsed the glass it turned her rings black. Sarah was heard
to remark “they won’t prosecute my Rosie will they?” after doctors accused her of
poisoning her mother. Rosina maintained that her mother wanted to commit suicide
which was why she had given her the arsenic and quicksilver.

Sarah died in the Melbourne Hospital on September 30, 1904. Doctors asked Sarah
before she died whether she had taken anything, which she denied but doctors felt she
was holding something back. After her death, analysis showed arsenic in every organ that
was examined.

Rosina Arrested

Rosina on her arrest for the wilful murder of her mother, Sarah, was heard to
exclaim “me murder my mother!” And then swooned. When she recovered, Rosina stated
that she did not murder her mother, that Sarah had asked for it. During the inquest,
Rosina was described as a “cunning shrewd little woman” but it was not certain she had
her “wits” about her. However, evidence was brought that it was James Robins who
had purchased the arsenic to poison a dog who had bitten someone.  The inquest concluded
with a verdict of wilful murder due to arsenic poisoning, wilfully and maliciously
administered by Rosina Hubbard.

During the murder trial, it was revealed that James Robins had also buried his two
previous wives! One wife died in Launceston about 15 years previously and the second
wife in Melbourne about 16 years previous. It was also alleged that James had fed his
wife oysters sprinkled with white powder. This was denied by James which caused an
outburst by Rosina, screaming that he did! It was also revealed that James did not have
much money to his name when he married Sarah, who herself owned properties. James
would gain the money from these properties on his wife’s death. It was also alleged that
James was the father of Rosina’s infant and that there had been improper relations
between the two.

Confession

In March, 1905, the Government was unhappy that Rosina had been acquitted for the
matricide of her mother Sarah. They deputised Detective McManamny to make further
inquiries in to the case. On re-interviewing, Rosina admitted that she had poisoned her
mother using quicksilver and arsenic. Her reasoning was that her mother knocked her
about and had accused her of relations with her stepfather. However, she also admitted
to the detective that James Robins was the father of her child. As Rosina had been
acquitted of the murder, she could not be retried!

Rosina’s Death

Rosina was not to enjoy her freedom for very long. She died in the Melbourne Hospital on
the 24th May 1905, after being hospitalised since the 5th. Her inquest was again
sensational, as it was originally suspected that Rosina had killed herself by taking the
same poisons as she had administered to her mother! Dr Mollison, the coroner described
Rosina as a congenital dwarf whose arms and legs were considerably smaller than the
rest of her body. She was 3 feet 10 inches in height and her head measured 22 inches.
there were no marks of violence and samples of her organs, muscles and bones were
taken for further analysis. After analysis, the official cause of death was exhaustion due
to ulceration of the intestines.

You would think that would be the end of the story! But there was one more twist!

Rosina’s will was contested on the grounds of her sanity when it went to probate.
Evidence was brought to court on how James Robins held a magnetic influence over
Rosina. It was stated that Robins banned anyone from seeing her in hospital especially
the “black fellow”, who was her half sister, Isabella Webster, Indian husband. Isabella
had described her father as a “brute”. The Chief Justice was to dismiss the content
stating there were no grounds on which to contest.

Bargearse was an Australian comedy TV series. Made by the Late Show on the ABC from the 18th of July 1992 to the 30th of October 1993. 

Produced by Michael Hirsh, and directed by Santo Cilauro, Tony Martin and Mick Molloy. 

Bargearse was an overdubbed version of Bluey, a 1976 Crawford production police drama set in Melbourne, Australia.

The segment was originally to be an overdubbing of an Australian soap opera, The Young Doctors, titled “Medical Hospital”, but the rights to the footage were pulled at the last minute.

The ABC series Truckies was considered for overdubbing in a segment intended to be titled “Truck Wits”, before the writers settled on Bluey.

This change left the writers with very little time, and as a result the planned 20 short episodes was cut down to 10, which aired in the second half of series two.

Bargearse was named after its protagonist, Detective Sergeant Bargearse, an overweight, moustache-sporting “rough-and-tumble” cop.

The sketches exploited Bluey’s weight with plentiful fat jokes, as well as many fart noises.

Bargearse was voiced by Tony Martin, while his sidekicks, Ann Bourke (Judith Lucy) and Detective Glen Twenty (Rob Sitch), Natalie Thigh-Blaster (Jane Kennedy), Natalie Thigh-Blaster).Chromedome (Mick Molloy) and Poloneck (Santo Cilauro).

Lucky Grills, who played Bluey, appeared on The Late Show three times: as a guest in the mock press conference for the Biodome participants, as the character Bluey protesting the last episode of Bargearse and in the musical appearance as noted above.

On the 15th of August 2007 a Bargearse and The Olden Days double feature DVD was released.

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au

A shocking tragedy occurred to-day at the Sir Walter Scott Hotel, at the corner of Elizabeth and Franklin-street, city. A⁣ young man, John Tunks, cutting the throat of Amelia Dean, a barmaid, with a razor, and then inflicting frightful injuries upon himself with the same instrument. He died within an hour, and the woman is in. a critical condition. ⁣ ⁣

The crime was committed in a bedroom on the first floor⁣ of the hotel, and the first intimation the other inmates had of the occurrence was the sight of Mrs. Dean rushing downstairs with blood flowing from a gash in her throat, followed by the man, similarly wounded. He was in a shocking condition, and had barely reached the foot of the stairs when he collapsed. It was evident from the nature of his injuries that he had used the razor with⁣ frenzied determination. Mrs. Dean, who was also very weak, staggered towards several of the inmates of the hotel, who were conversing near the door, exclaiming⁣ “Jack done, it. Jack done it.”⁣ ⁣

The pair were promptly removed to the Melbourne Hospital, and it was then seen that the man’s end was near. Mrs. Dean’s recovery is regarded as doubtful. A blood-stained razor was found lying at the foot of one of the two beds in the room from which the man and woman came. Both beds were also blood-stained, and there was a trail of blood from one bed through the door and down the stairway.

There were signs that a struggle had taken⁣ place.⁣ ⁣

Amelia Dean died 6 weeks later ⁣ ⁣

Frederick Bayley Deeming was one of 14 children born to Thomas and Ann Deeming in Leicestershire, England.

Frederick would first get into trouble with the law aged just 15 years old  for throwing rocks at a train.  At 16 he ranaway to see and began his life of crime with stealing and obtaining money by deception – something which would be a common thread for the rest of his life.

The beginning of the end for Deeming began with the discovery of Emily Lydia Mather’s decomposing body buried beneath the hearth of the second bedroom at 57 Andrew Street, Windsor on March 3, 1892.

Emily had married Deeming, who was know as Albert Williams in Rainhill, Lancashire in 1891 before the young couple set out for Australia.  They arrived in Melbourne in November 1891 and stayed for a short time in the city of Melbourne before heading to the rented property in Windsor.  Emily was not to know that this house would become her coffin!

On Christmas Eve, Deeming murdered Emily and in a well prepared plan buried her remains within the house before heading back to Melbourne.  He had paid up the rent for a couple of months so it wasnt until a new prospective tennant inspected the property that Emily’s remains were discovered.

By this time, Deeming had headed to Sydney and enticed Kate Rounsfell to marry him and move to WA with him.  Luckily for her Deeming left first and Kate only made it as far as Melbourne before news broke of her fiancee’s evil deeds.

But Emily was not the first murder Deeming had committed.  During the investigation into the death of Emily, it came to light that Deeming had been married before and had 4 children.  Marie and the children were found murdered and cemented under the kitchen floor at the property Deeming had rented in Rainhill.

Deeming was finally caught out by clever detective work and his boasting of his accomplishments.

Deeming was sentenced to death and was executed on May 29, 1892 at the Old Melbourne Gaol.

Before his death, a telegram was sent from London, requesting that Deeming be interviewed over the Whitechapel murders of 1888.  It would join numerous requests from police forces around the world asking if he could have been responsible for as many as 18 murders.