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ON THIS DAY …….3rd August 1918

William Henry Mogdridge,18 years of age, who was found guilty of the manslaughter of Eugene Charles Vernon, 54 years of age at Abbotsford, on August 3, came before Mr. Justice Cussen, in the Criminal Court, for sentence yesterday. The jury made a strong recommendation for mercy. Mr. Justice Cussen passed sentence of 12 months’ imprisonment, to be Suspended on a bond of £100 be entered into for Mogdridge’s good behaviour, and his abstinence from intoxicating liquor For 5 years. Mr. Clarke, who conducted the defence, said that Mogdridge was going to enlist.

 

On This Day – November 28, 1947

Following the finding by Coroner Burke, PM, yesterday that Joseph Patrick Turner, 29, of Abbotsford, had acted in self-defence because he feared he was in danger of serious bodily harm, police in the City Court today withdrew the charge against Turner of having murdered George Edward Barrett, alias John Hedley Paul, 36, of Parliament Place, City, at Fitzroy on November 28.

 

ON THIS DAY – November 16, 1907

Two men, Roy Sherrin, 19 years of age, a labourer, living in Nicholson street, Abbotsford, and William Thomas, driver, of River-street, Richmond, have been arrested, charged with the wilful murder of John Bradford. Bradford sustained a fracture of the skull in a brawl in Hoddle-street, on November 16, and died in the Melbourne  Hospital on Thursday. They were present at the inquest, which was opened at the Morgue to-day. Dr. Mollison said that he had a post mortem examination. There was a bruising on the right temporal muscle, and a fracture of the skull on the right side. There was an extensive bruising of the frontal lobes of the brain. The death was caused by the fracture of the skull and bruising of the brain. The Coroner intimated that the inquiry would be adjourned toll December 10.

 

On this day ………… 6th November 1920

Whether recent demonstrations by spiritualists in Melbourne or the defeat of the prohibition party at the polls, had an unsettling effect on the nerves of peaceable citizens cannot be definitely established said the Melbourne Age, but people in Abbotsford have been seeing a ghost. At any rate, they think they have seen one.

A female apparition appeared at an old house in Nicholson Street, Abbotsford, and people have been flocking to the locality at night to see it. The ghost story, too, has improved with circulation, having gained, notoriety with additional details of a murder in the house, the periodical return of the murdered woman’s spirit, and so forth.  The ghost was nothing more than a remarkable reflection thrown on the wall by a street lamp, the rays of which strike the verandah post and cast a reflection resembling a woman’s head. This reflection has been in existence for many years, but it is only within the past few days it has become the subject of much public interest.

On this night in 1920, four police constables in Nicholson-street ”moving on’ the crowds of ghost seekers, who numbers were estimated, between 400 and 500 people.

ON THIS DAY…… 17th September 1919

A sensation was caused in Johnston street, Abbotsford, this evening, when Mrs Agnes Aldous, wife of Mr James Aldous, licensee of the Yarra Hotel, was pursued along the street by a man and shot dead in a room at the rear of a shop into which she fled for safety. Malachi Richardson, a middle aged man, who fired two pistol shots at the woman, afterwards turned the weapon on himself and fell dead beside the prostrate body of Mrs Aldous. No one appears to have seen what occurred between Mrs Aldous and Richardson before the woman fled into the street. It appears that Mrs Aldous and Richardson were in partnership in the conduct of the Newport Hotel, in Newport. After managing the property for some considerable time they sold out about six months. Some hitch, the nature of which is unknown, took place in connection with the financial settlements after the sale of their joint interests in the hotel. A grievance on this point, under which Richardson seems to have been labouring, led to a deep seated difference occurring between himself and Mrs Aldous.

 

On this day …….. 14th of August 1949

Albert Stevens left home on his scooter on the afternoon of the 14th of August 1949 to buy a threepenny ice cream. The six year old had not gone far from his home in Hoddle st, Abbotsford, when he fell and the coin got stuck up his nose. Stevens went home and told his parents, who took him to the Children’s Hospital where the coin was removed.

ON THIS DAY …….3rd August 1918

William Henry Mogdridge,18 years of age, who was found guilty of the manslaughter of Eugene Charles Vernon, 54 years of age at Abbotsford, on August 3, came before Mr. Justice Cussen, in the Criminal Court, for sentence yesterday. The jury made a strong recommendation for mercy. Mr. Justice Cussen passed sentence of 12 months’ imprisonment, to be Suspended on a bond of £100 be entered into for Mogdridge’s good behaviour, and his abstinence from intoxicating liquor For 5 years. Mr. Clarke, who conducted the defence, said that Mogdridge was going to enlist.

 

On this day …….. 26th of January 1905

At the inquest was held on this day in 1905, on the body of John Thomas Brooks, a boy who was drowned in the Yarra river at Abbotsford, the evidence showed that the deceased and other boys were robbing pear trees in the Convent grounds. Some of the boys arranged to pretend that people were coming. This caused the deceased to run, and he slipped and fell into the river. As he could not swim he was drowned. A verdict of accidental death was returned.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 13, 1927

Under circumstances strongly suggesting foul play, the body of a young woman was found lying, partly hidden by bracken fern, close to a fence on Morningside Road at Frankston on this day. The body, which has been brought to Melbourne, was unrecognisable by the heat of the weather. The victim was Eileen Clarke, aged 25, a waitress employed in the City Cafe. The body was first discovered about 11am, by a boy aged 11. It is considered probable the body was taken to the place where it was found, in a motor car, and dragged through an opening in the fence. The surrounding ground is thickly covered with bracken, making it hard to pick up the trail of footprints or motor tyres. Thousands of motorists pass within 9ft. of the spot, but it is thought by the detectives in charge of the case, the body was placed in position. It was not discovered until the boy came upon it. The boy was considerably frightened by his discovery, and his disconnected account of it to his parents was not taken seriously for some time, so when they finally communicated with the Police the body had been found by a man and recovered by the Police. Following the publication of the girl’s description this morning, a young man called at the Detective Office and said he feared the dead girl was his sister. The body, however, was so disfigured by exposure to the sun that he was unable to positively identify her. His wife, later in the day identified the girl as her sister-in-law, Eileen Clarke. The dead girl came from Geelong where her mother lives, about three years ago. The post-mortem showed death was not due to septicaemia, as was at first suspected, but a haemorrhage following an internal rupture caused by criminal interference. Whoever interfered with the girl knew so little of physiology, and death followed the interference so swiftly, that there was no time for septicaemia to occur. The case presents many difficulties to the police, and is similar in many respects to other cases in Melbourne, as in those cases there was little or no attempt at concealment, the only consideration being to get rid of the body. The interference was so crude, it was first thought the girl might have inflicted the interference on herself. But the question of the transportation of the body comes in. It is also a fact that part of the clothing was placed on the body after death. A nurse Verose Eugenie Chamberlain was charge with the murder after an abortion gone wrong, in Abbotsford before moving the body.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 2, 1898

A STRANGE CASE.

The Melbourne ‘Argus’ of last week reports a singular case of mistaken identity. Henry Hudson was brought up before Mr. Nicholson, P.M., at the District Court on a maintenance summons in respect of the child of Fanny Cooper, of whom it was alleged he was the father.

Mr. Kane described how impropriety had taken place between the parties in March, 1889, the result being the child, which was born on January 2, 1890. A fortnight later Miss Cooper called on the defendant, whom she knew, and whom she now summoned as George Carter and, after meeting with a brutal reception, caused a warrant to be issued for his arrest. It was never executed, and the man disappeared from Melbourne, nothing being seen of him until about 12 months ago, when the prosecutrix encountered him in the Exhibition gardens. They spoke, and renewed their previous intimacy. The defence, Mr. Barrett had very fairly told him, would be that the defendant was at the time serving a sentence in Sydney, and if that were so, he could not be the father of the child.

The complainant then gave evidence in accordance with the opening statement. She had no doubt whatever about the identity of the defendant. He was the father of her child. Mr. Barrett: When you gave the description to the police, did you say he had black curly hair? Witness: Yes; he’s cut it off. A New South Wales criminal album was then handed up to the witness, and she pronounced the photo to be not that of the defendant. Mr. Barrett: But if we bring witnesses who were serving sentences with him?  Witness: I don’t care; he’s the father of my child.

Mrs. Annie Heron said that in March, 1889, she remembered complainant and a young man calling at her house in Abbotsford subsequent to the birth of Miss Cooper’s child she again saw the man, and believed the defendant in court to be the same man. The police photo was then shown, and the witness unhesitatingly pronounced it to be identical with the man she saw in 1889. Mr. Barrett: That will show you how women will swear. Detective Deyerall described the arrest of the defendant. He was satisfied that he was the same man as shown on the prison photo. Defendant was here, called up to the bench by Mr. Nicholson and closely scrutinised, his appearance being compared with the descriptions in the Police Album and the Police Gazette of New South Wales, which showed his discharge from gaol.

Defendant, then stated that on November 22, 1888,  Judge M’Farlane  sentenced him to four years’ penal servitude for receiving. He received a sunstroke in gaol, and as a result got a remission of sentence, being released in either March or April of 1891. He was not in Melbourne in his life until three years ago,and it was about about eight months since the complainant commenced following him about and making herself  a nuisance. He had no twin brother, and the only brother he had was very much younger.

The bench decided that further evidence was unnecessary, and dismissed the case, with £1 1s. costs. The complainant left the court still expressing her, confidence in the identity of the defendant.

ON THIS DAY – December 24, 1949

ABBOTSFORD

Labourer George Frederick Pearson (35), a criminal who had been wanted by the police for questioning regarding a shooting at Abbotsford, was shot dead at his Abbotsford home. Police inquiries ended when a man walked into the CIB. He was labourer Harry Summers (35), of Abbotsford. He was later charged with the shooting. Pearson was shot just below the heart with a pistol, apparently fired from the open front door of the house, soon after 8 p.m. on this day in 1949. Pearson was a well-known criminal with a list of convictions for several months this year, police in all States had been seeking him for questioning in connection with a shooting at Abbotsford earlier this year.

 

On This Day – November 28, 1947

Following the finding by Coroner Burke, PM, yesterday that Joseph Patrick Turner, 29, of Abbotsford, had acted in self-defence because he feared he was in danger of serious bodily harm, police in the City Court today withdrew the charge against Turner of having murdered George Edward Barrett, alias John Hedley Paul, 36, of Parliament Place, City, at Fitzroy on November 28.