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ON THIS DAY – July 9, 1927

CHARGE OF MURDER – Other Serious Offences Alleged

Following the death of a young woman at the Women’s Hospital early yesterday morning, Mary Adeline Le Neve, aged 45 years home duties, of Wattletree road, Armadale, appeared later in the morning at the City Court charged with having murdered Annie Florence Tregear, with having on July 9 illegally used an instrument on a woman and having on July 12 illegally used an instrument on another woman. The bench was occupied by Mr A A Kelley PM and Messrs T O’Callaghan, E Campbell W Brookes, and G Remfrey, J P’s Detective Grieves said: -In company with Detectives O’Keeffe and Sloan I went to Le Neve’s home in Wattletree road Armadale, on Saturday. In the front bedroom we found a young woman named Annie Florence Tregear in bed. We had her removed to the Women’s Hospital, where she died this morning. It is also alleged that two other young women on July 9 and July 12 respectively visited Le Neve’s house and that she illegally used an instrument upon them. One of the women is now an inmate of the Women’s Hospital and the other is at her home I ask that Le Neve be remanded to appear at the City Court on July 26 The application was granted  Le Neve, who was, brought to the court from the Melbourne Hospital to which she was admitted on Saturday, made no application for bail and was helped from the dock to the cells.

ON THIS DAY – December 3, 1908

MELBOURNE

An inquest was held on the body of Bertha Elizabeth Whitford, a domestic servant, 29 years of age, who was admitted to the Melbourne Hospital on November the 30th, and died in that institution on December the 3rd. The Coroner, in his finding, said “the death of the deceased was undoubtedly due to blood poisoning brought on by an operation, and the evidence points to Florence Hope as being the person who performed the operation, and I find that the cause of death was blood poisoning, and that Florence Hope is guilty of wilful murder. Mrs. Hope was committed for trial at the Supreme Court criminal sitting to be held on February the 15th next. Bail in accused’s own recognisance of £200 and on a surety of £200 was allowed.

ON THIS DAY…… 15th August 1908

At the Criminal Court in Melbourne, Elizabeth Downey, an elderly woman, was charged with the wilful murder of Ruby Aylwood on this day in 1908.  Malpractice being alleged. Downey was found not guilty and discharged. This was an abortion that had gone wrong.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – July 9, 1927

CHARGE OF MURDER – Other Serious Offences Alleged

Following the death of a young woman at the Women’s Hospital early yesterday morning, Mary Adeline Le Neve, aged 45 years home duties, of Wattletree road, Armadale, appeared later in the morning at the City Court charged with having murdered Annie Florence Tregear, with having on July 9 illegally used an instrument on a woman and having on July 12 illegally used an instrument on another woman. The bench was occupied by Mr A A Kelley PM and Messrs T O’Callaghan, E Campbell W Brookes, and G Remfrey, J P’s Detective Grieves said: -In company with Detectives O’Keeffe and Sloan I went to Le Neve’s home in Wattletree road Armadale, on Saturday. In the front bedroom we found a young woman named Annie Florence Tregear in bed. We had her removed to the Women’s Hospital, where she died this morning. It is also alleged that two other young women on July 9 and July 12 respectively visited Le Neve’s house and that she illegally used an instrument upon them. One of the women is now an inmate of the Women’s Hospital and the other is at her home I ask that Le Neve be remanded to appear at the City Court on July 26 The application was granted  Le Neve, who was, brought to the court from the Melbourne Hospital to which she was admitted on Saturday, made no application for bail and was helped from the dock to the cells.

ON THIS DAY – January 27, 1925

At the Richmond Court, Hannah Elizabeth Mitchell was charged with having murdered Eva Malcina Pitt on the 27th of January. Nurse Mitchell had previously been arrested on a charge of having performed an illegal operation. She was remanded for a week on bail of £1000.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 13, 1927

Under circumstances strongly suggesting foul play, the body of a young woman was found lying, partly hidden by bracken fern, close to a fence on Morningside Road at Frankston on this day. The body, which has been brought to Melbourne, was unrecognisable by the heat of the weather. The victim was Eileen Clarke, aged 25, a waitress employed in the City Cafe. The body was first discovered about 11am, by a boy aged 11. It is considered probable the body was taken to the place where it was found, in a motor car, and dragged through an opening in the fence. The surrounding ground is thickly covered with bracken, making it hard to pick up the trail of footprints or motor tyres. Thousands of motorists pass within 9ft. of the spot, but it is thought by the detectives in charge of the case, the body was placed in position. It was not discovered until the boy came upon it. The boy was considerably frightened by his discovery, and his disconnected account of it to his parents was not taken seriously for some time, so when they finally communicated with the Police the body had been found by a man and recovered by the Police. Following the publication of the girl’s description this morning, a young man called at the Detective Office and said he feared the dead girl was his sister. The body, however, was so disfigured by exposure to the sun that he was unable to positively identify her. His wife, later in the day identified the girl as her sister-in-law, Eileen Clarke. The dead girl came from Geelong where her mother lives, about three years ago. The post-mortem showed death was not due to septicaemia, as was at first suspected, but a haemorrhage following an internal rupture caused by criminal interference. Whoever interfered with the girl knew so little of physiology, and death followed the interference so swiftly, that there was no time for septicaemia to occur. The case presents many difficulties to the police, and is similar in many respects to other cases in Melbourne, as in those cases there was little or no attempt at concealment, the only consideration being to get rid of the body. The interference was so crude, it was first thought the girl might have inflicted the interference on herself. But the question of the transportation of the body comes in. It is also a fact that part of the clothing was placed on the body after death. A nurse Verose Eugenie Chamberlain was charge with the murder after an abortion gone wrong, in Abbotsford before moving the body.

 

 

MELBOURNE

WOMAN COMMITTED FOR MURDER

An inquest was held on the body of Bertha Elizabeth Whitford, a domestic servant, 29 years of age, who was admitted to the Melbourne Hospital on November the 30th, and died in that institution on December the 3rd. The Coroner, in his finding, said “the death of the deceased was undoubtedly due to blood poisoning brought on by an operation, and the evidence points to Florence Hope as being the person who performed the operation, and I find that the cause of death was blood poisoning, and that Florence Hope is guilty of wilful murder. Mrs. Hope was committed for trial at the Supreme Court criminal sitting to be held on February the 15th next. Bail in accused’s own recognisance of £200 and on a surety of £200 was allowed.

ON THIS DAY…… 15th August 1908

At the Criminal Court in Melbourne, Elizabeth Downey, an elderly woman, was charged with the wilful murder of Ruby Aylwood on this day in 1908.  Malpractice being alleged. Downey was found not guilty and discharged. This was an abortion that had gone wrong.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – July 9, 1927

CHARGE OF MURDER – Other Serious Offences Alleged

Following the death of a young woman at the Women’s Hospital early yesterday morning, Mary Adeline Le Neve, aged 45 years home duties, of Wattletree road, Armadale, appeared later in the morning at the City Court charged with having murdered Annie Florence Tregear, with having on July 9 illegally used an instrument on a woman and having on July 12 illegally used an instrument on another woman. The bench was occupied by Mr A A Kelley PM and Messrs T O’Callaghan, E Campbell W Brookes, and G Remfrey, J P’s Detective Grieves said: -In company with Detectives O’Keeffe and Sloan I went to Le Neve’s home in Wattletree road Armadale, on Saturday. In the front bedroom we found a young woman named Annie Florence Tregear in bed. We had her removed to the Women’s Hospital, where she died this morning. It is also alleged that two other young women on July 9 and July 12 respectively visited Le Neve’s house and that she illegally used an instrument upon them. One of the women is now an inmate of the Women’s Hospital and the other is at her home I ask that Le Neve be remanded to appear at the City Court on July 26 The application was granted  Le Neve, who was, brought to the court from the Melbourne Hospital to which she was admitted on Saturday, made no application for bail and was helped from the dock to the cells.

ON THIS DAY – January 27, 1925

At the Richmond Court, Hannah Elizabeth Mitchell was charged with having murdered Eva Malcina Pitt on the 27th of January. Nurse Mitchell had previously been arrested on a charge of having performed an illegal operation. She was remanded for a week on bail of £1000.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 13, 1927

Under circumstances strongly suggesting foul play, the body of a young woman was found lying, partly hidden by bracken fern, close to a fence on Morningside Road at Frankston on this day. The body, which has been brought to Melbourne, was unrecognisable by the heat of the weather. The victim was Eileen Clarke, aged 25, a waitress employed in the City Cafe. The body was first discovered about 11am, by a boy aged 11. It is considered probable the body was taken to the place where it was found, in a motor car, and dragged through an opening in the fence. The surrounding ground is thickly covered with bracken, making it hard to pick up the trail of footprints or motor tyres. Thousands of motorists pass within 9ft. of the spot, but it is thought by the detectives in charge of the case, the body was placed in position. It was not discovered until the boy came upon it. The boy was considerably frightened by his discovery, and his disconnected account of it to his parents was not taken seriously for some time, so when they finally communicated with the Police the body had been found by a man and recovered by the Police. Following the publication of the girl’s description this morning, a young man called at the Detective Office and said he feared the dead girl was his sister. The body, however, was so disfigured by exposure to the sun that he was unable to positively identify her. His wife, later in the day identified the girl as her sister-in-law, Eileen Clarke. The dead girl came from Geelong where her mother lives, about three years ago. The post-mortem showed death was not due to septicaemia, as was at first suspected, but a haemorrhage following an internal rupture caused by criminal interference. Whoever interfered with the girl knew so little of physiology, and death followed the interference so swiftly, that there was no time for septicaemia to occur. The case presents many difficulties to the police, and is similar in many respects to other cases in Melbourne, as in those cases there was little or no attempt at concealment, the only consideration being to get rid of the body. The interference was so crude, it was first thought the girl might have inflicted the interference on herself. But the question of the transportation of the body comes in. It is also a fact that part of the clothing was placed on the body after death. A nurse Verose Eugenie Chamberlain was charge with the murder after an abortion gone wrong, in Abbotsford before moving the body.

 

 

MELBOURNE

WOMAN COMMITTED FOR MURDER

An inquest was held on the body of Bertha Elizabeth Whitford, a domestic servant, 29 years of age, who was admitted to the Melbourne Hospital on November the 30th, and died in that institution on December the 3rd. The Coroner, in his finding, said “the death of the deceased was undoubtedly due to blood poisoning brought on by an operation, and the evidence points to Florence Hope as being the person who performed the operation, and I find that the cause of death was blood poisoning, and that Florence Hope is guilty of wilful murder. Mrs. Hope was committed for trial at the Supreme Court criminal sitting to be held on February the 15th next. Bail in accused’s own recognisance of £200 and on a surety of £200 was allowed.