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ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1933

Evidence at Inquest

A coronial inquiry into the death of Catherine Dorman, 24, a machinist, in a boarding house at Windsor on July 19 was commenced by Dr Paull, of the Alfred Hospital, said that the girl did not die until July 26. During the time in hospital she kept murmuring “Why did you do it John” and clearly indicated ‘John’ had been responsible for her injuries, which could have been inflicted by a man wielding lead pole which had inflicted extensive injuries. Nellie Burke, said that the deceased had taken a room at her house early in June, and a man who she introduced as Boles visited her frequently. “At 11 p m on July 19,” said the witness ‘I heard screams from Dorman’s room. The door was ajar and I saw Miss Dorman standing at the foot of the bed with her hands crossed on her chest and her head bowed. Boles was standing at the foot of the bed bolting hei willi a piece of lead piping ” Witness said that she ran in and struggled with Boles who hit her on the neck and head with the piping. She began to lose her senses and called for assistance. The coroner returned a verdict of murder and directed a warrant to be issued for the arrest of Boles whose whereabouts are unknown to the police.

ON THIS DAY – June 30, 1906

On Saturday, Detective Burvett took charge of the investigations into the murder of Patrick O’Rourke who died in the Alfred Hospital on June 30 from injuries received at St Kilda on the night of June 23. Burvett made three visits to St Kilda on Saturday, and carefully went over the supposed scene of the murder. Then he inspected the dead mans clothing but failed to find anything that would serve as material for any theory as to the murder

O’Rourke when he died had a pronounced black eye. This has been regarded as showing that he was attacked and struck in the eye before receiving the injury that proved fatal. The blow in the eye has also been advanced to account for O’Rourke’s hat having been off when his skull was fractured. Burvett has, however, proved that the black eye was not the result of a separate blow. The fracture of the skull had been very slight and was somewhat below the cut on forehead. The ecchymosis of the eye was the result of this fracture, and did not develop for some days. When O’Rourke was admitted to the hospital no signs of a blow on the eye were discernible.

Detective Sexton and Plain-clothes Constable White are assisting Detective Burvett in his inquiries but very little can be done until the Government analyst has given his opinion with regard to the supposed blood-stained board and O’Rourke’s clothes all of which have been submitted to him.

ON THIS DAY ……. 3rd June 2007
Shannon McCormack, 22, was punched outside the QBH nightclub around 4am on May 27, 2007, as he attempted to break up a fight. His head hit the ground when he fell and he died in the Alfred Hospital a week later. An inquest was held into the death of Shannon McCormack in October 2011. Police released CCTV footage of a possible suspect in February 2012. Police want to speak to a man described as aged in his early 20s, thin and 165cm to 175cm tall. He was wearing jeans and a T-shirt.

On this day …….. 14th of December 1935

Arrested in a police raid early in the morning, William Sylvester John Barrett, 22, labourer, of Drummond Street, Carlton, appeared in the City Court charged with having murdered, on or about December 7, William Herbert Irwine York, at St. Kilda. Barrett was remanded to December 23, and in compliance with a police request bail was refused. Having given evidence of Barrett’s arrest, Detective William Ferguson said, it is alleged, that about midnight on December 7, York was walking along Fitzroy Street, St. Kilda. Later he was found unconscious near St. Kilda Road. He was taken into the Alfred Hospital, where he was kept under observation and allowed to return home. His injuries took a serious turn on the following day and he died early on the morning of December 9, as a result, it is alleged, of injuries he received. A post-mortem examination showed that death was due to a number of fractures of the skull.’ Barrett had made a statement about the matter. Detective Ferguson concluded. Barrett, a well-built young man, was not represented by counsel.

On This Day – November 3, 1923

Coroner Says “Manslaughter.”

Circumstances leading to the death of Victor Clarence Pearce, aged 22 years, married, who was shot on November 3 in a wine cafe in Carlisle street, St. Kilda, owned by Robert George Leslie Blair, and who died at the Alfred Hospital on the following day, were investigated at the morgue yesterday by the city coroner (Mr. Berriman, P.M.).

Vivian Clyne Pearce said that he and his brother, together with Edward Arthur Wilson, went to Blair’s wine shop on Saturday, November 3, but found it closed. Wilson, looking over the fence at the back, asked Blair to let him have a bottle of wine. Blair replied, “You cannot have one.” His brother then got over the fence, but Blair opened the back gate and told him to get out. Wilson followed his brother into the yard. As Wilson came out again Blair pointed a revolver at him, and Wilson fell to the ground. He could not say whether Wilson was shot. There had been no altercation.

Continuing, witness said that his brother ran past Mrs, Blair, and when he was about four yards away, Blair fired at him. Witness next assisted his brother, who had fallen, to the stable. He admitted that deceased had been fined several times for assault.

 

The coroner found that Pearce’s death was due to a bullet wound inflicted with a revolver by Robert George Leslie Blair, and that Blair was guilty of manslaughter.

Bail was allowed in one personal surety and one other surety, each for £100.

ON THIS DAY – October 28, 1933

 

Ellen Maud Holmes married, Grey street South Yarra was charged at the Prahran Court on Friday, with having on October 28 wounded Christopher Green with intent to commit murder. Christopher Green, painter, Simmonds street, South Yarra, said that about 9 p m on October 28, he was about to enter a house in Williams road, Toorak, when he heard a shot and a bullet entered his left arm. He ran into Woodside crescent and saw Mrs.Holmes following him, carrying a rifle. He grappled with her and she struck him on the forehead with the stock of the gun, but eventually he wrested it from her. He was admitted to the Alfred Hospital. Mrs. Holmes had been a tenant for 13 years in a house which he owned in Grey street. Detective B. H. Cavanagh of the police wireless patrol, said that with other police he interviewed Mrs. Holmes at her residence at 2 a.m on October 28. In a written statement which she signed, she said that although she had paid her rent regularly during the 13 years in which she had been a tenant of Green’s house she had fallen in arrears for one week owing to the illness of her daughter. As Green owed her a small amount, she refused to pay the week’s rent until he deducted this amount. He sent her a notice to quit, however, and she became desperate.  Mrs. Holmes who pleaded not guilty, was committed for trial at the sittings of the Supreme Court, to begin on December 4. Bail was allowed in a surety of £300 and a personal bond of £300.

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1933

Evidence at Inquest

A coronial inquiry into the death of Catherine Dorman, 24, a machinist, in a boarding house at Windsor on July 19 was commenced by Dr Paull, of the Alfred Hospital, said that the girl did not die until July 26. During the time in hospital she kept murmuring “Why did you do it John” and clearly indicated ‘John’ had been responsible for her injuries, which could have been inflicted by a man wielding lead pole which had inflicted extensive injuries. Nellie Burke, said that the deceased had taken a room at her house early in June, and a man who she introduced as Boles visited her frequently. “At 11 p m on July 19,” said the witness ‘I heard screams from Dorman’s room. The door was ajar and I saw Miss Dorman standing at the foot of the bed with her hands crossed on her chest and her head bowed. Boles was standing at the foot of the bed bolting hei willi a piece of lead piping ” Witness said that she ran in and struggled with Boles who hit her on the neck and head with the piping. She began to lose her senses and called for assistance. The coroner returned a verdict of murder and directed a warrant to be issued for the arrest of Boles whose whereabouts are unknown to the police.

ON THIS DAY – June 30, 1906

On Saturday, Detective Burvett took charge of the investigations into the murder of Patrick O’Rourke who died in the Alfred Hospital on June 30 from injuries received at St Kilda on the night of June 23. Burvett made three visits to St Kilda on Saturday, and carefully went over the supposed scene of the murder. Then he inspected the dead mans clothing but failed to find anything that would serve as material for any theory as to the murder

O’Rourke when he died had a pronounced black eye. This has been regarded as showing that he was attacked and struck in the eye before receiving the injury that proved fatal. The blow in the eye has also been advanced to account for O’Rourke’s hat having been off when his skull was fractured. Burvett has, however, proved that the black eye was not the result of a separate blow. The fracture of the skull had been very slight and was somewhat below the cut on forehead. The ecchymosis of the eye was the result of this fracture, and did not develop for some days. When O’Rourke was admitted to the hospital no signs of a blow on the eye were discernible.

Detective Sexton and Plain-clothes Constable White are assisting Detective Burvett in his inquiries but very little can be done until the Government analyst has given his opinion with regard to the supposed blood-stained board and O’Rourke’s clothes all of which have been submitted to him.

ON THIS DAY ……. 3rd June 2007
Shannon McCormack, 22, was punched outside the QBH nightclub around 4am on May 27, 2007, as he attempted to break up a fight. His head hit the ground when he fell and he died in the Alfred Hospital a week later. An inquest was held into the death of Shannon McCormack in October 2011. Police released CCTV footage of a possible suspect in February 2012. Police want to speak to a man described as aged in his early 20s, thin and 165cm to 175cm tall. He was wearing jeans and a T-shirt.

ON THIS DAY ……. 29th March 1917

A horrible accident happened on this day to a married woman, of East Prahran. While working at the Australian Jam Works, she would lose her footing and fall into a boiling pot of jam. On admission to the Alfred Hospital she was found to have burns to most of her body.

 

 

On this day ………… 5th March 1909

A laborer named William Whale, aged 48 who resided with his son-in-law at 17 Barkly Avenue, Malvern, died in the Alfred Hospital on this day in 1909, from the effects of sun stroke. He was affected about midday while at work on some excavations at Malvern, but was not discovered until several hours later. Then he was unconscious, and Dr. Gillis, who was called to set him, recommended his removal to the hospital. He did not recover and died as above stated.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 24, 1951

SCORESBY

Detectives charged a 15-year-old Glen Waverley boy with the manslaughter of a 12-year old shooting companion. The dead boy was Brendon Thomas, of Derna rd., Ashburton, who was hit by a richocheting bullet while shooting at Scoresby on February 24. He died in Alfred Hospital on March 15 from a wound in the abdomen.