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In November 2009 it was reported that up to 6000 feral camels in search of water had invaded Docker River, a small Aboriginal community of about 350 people located about 500km southwest of Alice Springs. Local residents had been afraid to leave their homes for some time. The camels have torn up the main waterpipes and sewerage pipes, made the town’s airport unusable and contaminated the town’s water supply.

The Northern Territory government decided to take action and announced $49,000 in emergency funding for a cull in which helicopters will be used to herd the animals outside the town, where the camels will be shot and left to decay in the desert.

 

Wedge-tailed eagle tries to snatch Victorian boy at the Birds of Prey show in Alice Springs
A YOUNG Victorian was left shaken and bloodied after a wedge-tailed eagle tried to take off with him at the Alice Springs Desert Park during last week’s Birds of Prey show.

The encounter, on July 6, 2016 left a sizeable gash on the boy’s face, and serves as a reminder to the unpredictable nature of Australia’s wildlife. The eagle tried to snatch a young boy at the bird show.  It is believed the boy and his family were visiting Alice Springs from Albury Wodonga. Victorians Keenan Lucas and Suze Fraser were visiting the Desert Park on the same day and witnessed the ordeal. “We’re at the bird show in the afternoon, having a great time and looking forward to seeing the wedge-tailed eagle come out for the finale,” Mr Lucas said.

“The bird then flew over the crowd and tried to grab on to a young boy’s head. “He screamed, the mother was distraught, and the presenters wrapped up the show very quickly.” Desert Park said the boy was physically OK and his facial wounds were “superficial”.

Christine O’Connell told the Herald Sun it appeared the young boy wasn’t wearing camouflage which could have confused the eagle.

“He he had a green hoodie and he kept pulling the zipper up and down,” Ms O’Connell said.

“The bird seemed agitated at the noise and all he could see would be the boys face.”

Ms Connell posted the picture on her Instagram account and explained how the eagle was meant to fly over to a log for a photo opportunity.

“Instead, he flew straight to the young boy and attacked him,” she said.

“The show was quickly cancelled and the boy was taken to first aid.”

On This Day ….. 26th November 2009

In November 2009 it was reported that up to 6000 feral camels in search of water had invaded Docker River, a small Aboriginal community of about 350 people located about 500km southwest of Alice Springs. Local residents had been afraid to leave their homes for some time. The camels have torn up the main waterpipes and sewerage pipes, made the town’s airport unusable and contaminated the town’s water supply.

The Northern Territory government decided to take action and announced $49,000 in emergency funding for a cull in which helicopters will be used to herd the animals outside the town, where the camels will be shot and left to decay in the desert.

 

On this day …….. 18th of October 1928

The Coniston Massacre was the last known massacre of Australian Aborigines. Occurring at Coniston cattle station, Northern Territory, Australia, it was a revenge killing for the death of dingo hunter Frederick Brooks, who was believed to have been killed by Aborigines in August 1928. Constable William Murray, officer in charge at Barrow Creek, investigated and came to the conclusion that the killing had been done by members of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye people. There were no witnesses, and apparent inconsistencies in Murray’s report were never questioned. Murray took matters into his own hand. Over the next few days, up until 30 August, he shot 17 members of the Aboriginal tribes he believed were responsible, and claimed his actions were made in self-defence and that each tribal member he had killed was in possession of some item belonging to Brooks. In the ensuing weeks, Murray again encountered several groups of Aborigines while investigating another non-fatal attack on a settler named Nugget Morton at Broadmeadows Station. Together with Morton, one other white man and an aboriginal boy, Murray embarked on a campaign of revenge, during which another 14 Aborigines were killed. He returned to Alice Springs with his report on 18 October 1928. Murray was never punished for his actions. On the contrary, the Board of Enquiry members were selected to maximise damage-control. It was believed at the time that Murray’s actions were appropriate for the circumstances. The Central Land Council organised the seventy-fifth anniversary of the massacre, commemorated near Yuendumu on 24 September 2003.

 

On this day …….. 7th of August 1928

Dingo hunter Frederick Brooks is killed, sparking the Coniston Massacre of Australian Aborigines.

Coniston Station is a large cattle station in central Australia, about 300 km northwest of Alice Springs. Covering 2178 sq km, it is bordered by the Tanami Desert to the west. The cattle station was founded by pastoralist Randall Stafford in 1923 and named after a town in his native England. On 7 August 1928 the body of white dingo hunter, Frederick Brooks, was found on the property. Traditional aboriginal weapons lay nearby, implicating the local indigenous people. Constable William Murray, officer in charge at Barrow Creek, investigated and came to the conclusion that the killing had been done by members of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye people. Within a few days, Constable Murray began to take matters of ‘white justice’ into his own hands, instigating a series of revenge killings that came to be known as the Coniston Massacre. This was the last known massacre of Australian Aborigines. Between 14 and 30 August, Murray shot at least 17 members of the Aboriginal tribes he believed were responsible, and claimed his actions were made in self-defence and that each tribal member he had killed was in possession of some item belonging to Brooks. Murray was never punished for his actions. On the contrary, the Board of Enquiry members were selected to maximise damage-control. It was believed at the time that Murray’s actions were appropriate for the circumstances. The Central Land Council organised the seventy-fifth anniversary of the massacre, commemorated near Yuendumu on 24 September 2003.

 

In November 2009 it was reported that up to 6000 feral camels in search of water had invaded Docker River, a small Aboriginal community of about 350 people located about 500km southwest of Alice Springs. Local residents had been afraid to leave their homes for some time. The camels have torn up the main waterpipes and sewerage pipes, made the town’s airport unusable and contaminated the town’s water supply.

The Northern Territory government decided to take action and announced $49,000 in emergency funding for a cull in which helicopters will be used to herd the animals outside the town, where the camels will be shot and left to decay in the desert.

 

Wedge-tailed eagle tries to snatch Victorian boy at the Birds of Prey show in Alice Springs
A YOUNG Victorian was left shaken and bloodied after a wedge-tailed eagle tried to take off with him at the Alice Springs Desert Park during last week’s Birds of Prey show.

The encounter, on July 6, 2016 left a sizeable gash on the boy’s face, and serves as a reminder to the unpredictable nature of Australia’s wildlife. The eagle tried to snatch a young boy at the bird show.  It is believed the boy and his family were visiting Alice Springs from Albury Wodonga. Victorians Keenan Lucas and Suze Fraser were visiting the Desert Park on the same day and witnessed the ordeal. “We’re at the bird show in the afternoon, having a great time and looking forward to seeing the wedge-tailed eagle come out for the finale,” Mr Lucas said.

“The bird then flew over the crowd and tried to grab on to a young boy’s head. “He screamed, the mother was distraught, and the presenters wrapped up the show very quickly.” Desert Park said the boy was physically OK and his facial wounds were “superficial”.

Christine O’Connell told the Herald Sun it appeared the young boy wasn’t wearing camouflage which could have confused the eagle.

“He he had a green hoodie and he kept pulling the zipper up and down,” Ms O’Connell said.

“The bird seemed agitated at the noise and all he could see would be the boys face.”

Ms Connell posted the picture on her Instagram account and explained how the eagle was meant to fly over to a log for a photo opportunity.

“Instead, he flew straight to the young boy and attacked him,” she said.

“The show was quickly cancelled and the boy was taken to first aid.”

On This Day ….. 26th November 2009

In November 2009 it was reported that up to 6000 feral camels in search of water had invaded Docker River, a small Aboriginal community of about 350 people located about 500km southwest of Alice Springs. Local residents had been afraid to leave their homes for some time. The camels have torn up the main waterpipes and sewerage pipes, made the town’s airport unusable and contaminated the town’s water supply.

The Northern Territory government decided to take action and announced $49,000 in emergency funding for a cull in which helicopters will be used to herd the animals outside the town, where the camels will be shot and left to decay in the desert.

 

On this day …….. 18th of October 1928

The Coniston Massacre was the last known massacre of Australian Aborigines. Occurring at Coniston cattle station, Northern Territory, Australia, it was a revenge killing for the death of dingo hunter Frederick Brooks, who was believed to have been killed by Aborigines in August 1928. Constable William Murray, officer in charge at Barrow Creek, investigated and came to the conclusion that the killing had been done by members of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye people. There were no witnesses, and apparent inconsistencies in Murray’s report were never questioned. Murray took matters into his own hand. Over the next few days, up until 30 August, he shot 17 members of the Aboriginal tribes he believed were responsible, and claimed his actions were made in self-defence and that each tribal member he had killed was in possession of some item belonging to Brooks. In the ensuing weeks, Murray again encountered several groups of Aborigines while investigating another non-fatal attack on a settler named Nugget Morton at Broadmeadows Station. Together with Morton, one other white man and an aboriginal boy, Murray embarked on a campaign of revenge, during which another 14 Aborigines were killed. He returned to Alice Springs with his report on 18 October 1928. Murray was never punished for his actions. On the contrary, the Board of Enquiry members were selected to maximise damage-control. It was believed at the time that Murray’s actions were appropriate for the circumstances. The Central Land Council organised the seventy-fifth anniversary of the massacre, commemorated near Yuendumu on 24 September 2003.

 

On this day …….. 7th of August 1928

Dingo hunter Frederick Brooks is killed, sparking the Coniston Massacre of Australian Aborigines.

Coniston Station is a large cattle station in central Australia, about 300 km northwest of Alice Springs. Covering 2178 sq km, it is bordered by the Tanami Desert to the west. The cattle station was founded by pastoralist Randall Stafford in 1923 and named after a town in his native England. On 7 August 1928 the body of white dingo hunter, Frederick Brooks, was found on the property. Traditional aboriginal weapons lay nearby, implicating the local indigenous people. Constable William Murray, officer in charge at Barrow Creek, investigated and came to the conclusion that the killing had been done by members of the Warlpiri, Anmatyerre and Kaytetye people. Within a few days, Constable Murray began to take matters of ‘white justice’ into his own hands, instigating a series of revenge killings that came to be known as the Coniston Massacre. This was the last known massacre of Australian Aborigines. Between 14 and 30 August, Murray shot at least 17 members of the Aboriginal tribes he believed were responsible, and claimed his actions were made in self-defence and that each tribal member he had killed was in possession of some item belonging to Brooks. Murray was never punished for his actions. On the contrary, the Board of Enquiry members were selected to maximise damage-control. It was believed at the time that Murray’s actions were appropriate for the circumstances. The Central Land Council organised the seventy-fifth anniversary of the massacre, commemorated near Yuendumu on 24 September 2003.

 

In November 2009 it was reported that up to 6000 feral camels in search of water had invaded Docker River, a small Aboriginal community of about 350 people located about 500km southwest of Alice Springs. Local residents had been afraid to leave their homes for some time. The camels have torn up the main waterpipes and sewerage pipes, made the town’s airport unusable and contaminated the town’s water supply.

The Northern Territory government decided to take action and announced $49,000 in emergency funding for a cull in which helicopters will be used to herd the animals outside the town, where the camels will be shot and left to decay in the desert.

 

Wedge-tailed eagle tries to snatch Victorian boy at the Birds of Prey show in Alice Springs
A YOUNG Victorian was left shaken and bloodied after a wedge-tailed eagle tried to take off with him at the Alice Springs Desert Park during last week’s Birds of Prey show.

The encounter, on July 6, 2016 left a sizeable gash on the boy’s face, and serves as a reminder to the unpredictable nature of Australia’s wildlife. The eagle tried to snatch a young boy at the bird show.  It is believed the boy and his family were visiting Alice Springs from Albury Wodonga. Victorians Keenan Lucas and Suze Fraser were visiting the Desert Park on the same day and witnessed the ordeal. “We’re at the bird show in the afternoon, having a great time and looking forward to seeing the wedge-tailed eagle come out for the finale,” Mr Lucas said.

“The bird then flew over the crowd and tried to grab on to a young boy’s head. “He screamed, the mother was distraught, and the presenters wrapped up the show very quickly.” Desert Park said the boy was physically OK and his facial wounds were “superficial”.

Christine O’Connell told the Herald Sun it appeared the young boy wasn’t wearing camouflage which could have confused the eagle.

“He he had a green hoodie and he kept pulling the zipper up and down,” Ms O’Connell said.

“The bird seemed agitated at the noise and all he could see would be the boys face.”

Ms Connell posted the picture on her Instagram account and explained how the eagle was meant to fly over to a log for a photo opportunity.

“Instead, he flew straight to the young boy and attacked him,” she said.

“The show was quickly cancelled and the boy was taken to first aid.”