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ON THIS DAY…… 4th November 1922

Concerts at Geelong Gaol

Since the escape of Angus Murray from Geelong gaol there has been a ban on the fortnightly concerts that were formerly held in the gaol for the entertainment of the prisoners. The Inspector-General has now issued instructions that the concerts may again be held , and with the object of reverting to the former practice it has been decided to hold a concert on the afternoon of Saturday, November 10. The assistance of vocal and other artists is desired. Visitors will notice that the surroundings of the gaol have been improved, as the painters and decorators have renovated and decorated the interior of the building. Angus Murray’s cell has been repaired, and peace and order seem to again prevail. The prisoners’ choir master (Angus Murrray) will be succeeded by another prisoner who shows vocal power. It is not generally known that among the prisoners are several men who can contribute an entertainment.

ON THIS DAY…… 22nd October 1923

On the 24th of August 1923, Angus Murray, who is serving a sentence of 15 years for robbery under arms, mace his escape, by mean’s of a small saw, he removed of the stones at the base of his window. The bars were then loosened, leaving him sufficient room to squeeze through. Murray torn his bedclothes into shreds to form a rope to lower himself to the ground. He was then able to scale the outside wall were a motor car which was waiting for him. A boy, passing the Gaol at the time of the escape saw Murray clamber down from his cell and spring into a car. The police scoured the district, but could not find any trace of the fugitive. On the morning of the 9th of October 1923, Murray shoot Mr Berriman the manager of the Glenferrie branch of the Commercial Bank and robbed him of £1851. Berriman died the on the 22nd of October. A large force of detectives raided, a house in St, Kilda at 5am, arresting Angus Murray, Leslie (Squlazy) Taylor, and Ida Pender. Angus Murray was charged with the Glenferrie robbery and with escaping from custody. Taylor and Pender were locked up on holding charges, but wore later released. A few days after Berriman’s death Murray was charged with his murder and on 14th of April 1924, he was executed in the Melbourne Gaol. Murray stood on the scaffold and made the following statement: “Never in my life have I done anything to justify the extreme penalty being passed upon me. I have prayed hard for those who have acted against me, and I hope that those whom I have injured will forgive me.” Turning to the hangman as the rope was passed around his neck, he said: “Pull it tight.” Murray’s death was instantaneous.

 

On This Day – October 20, 1923

Mr. T. R. V. Berriman, who was shot and robbed at Glenferrie on October 8, died in a private hospital on October 20.

After consulting with the chief commissioner of police (Mr. Nicholson) the Chief Secretary (Dr. Argyle) announced that the Ministry had decided to offer a reward of £500 for information which would lead to the arrest and conviction of Richard Buckley, for whom the police are searching in connection with the Glenferrie robbery. The police arc confident that they will soon make an arrest.

Angus Murray, aged 42 years, a clerk, who, had been in custody on a charge of robbery has been charged with the murder, of Berriman.

Leslie Taylor has been charged with having harboured and maintained Angus Murray and Richard Buckley, knowing that they were concerned with the shooting of T. R. V. Berriman, and also with having been, both before and after, an accessory to the felony committed at Glenferrie 011 October 8. An application for bail was refused by the bench.

On This Day ……. 24th of August 1923

On the 24th of August 1923, Angus Murray, who is serving a sentence of 15 years for robbery under arms, made his escape, by means of a small saw, he removed the stones at the base of his window. The bars were then loosened, leaving him sufficient room to squeeze through. Murray had torn his bedclothes into shreds to form a rope to lower himself to the ground. He was then able to scale the outside wall were a motor car was waiting for him. A boy, passing the Gaol at the time of the escape saw Murray clamber down from his cell and spring into a car. The police scoured the district, but could not find any trace of the fugitive. On the morning of the 9th of October 1923, Murray shot Mr Berriman the manager of the Glenferrie branch of the Commercial Bank and robbed him of £1851. Berriman died the on the 22nd of October. A large force of detectives raided, a house in St, Kilda at 5am, arresting Angus Murray, Leslie (Squizzy) Taylor, and Ida Pender. Angus Murray was charged with the Glenferrie robbery and with escaping from custody. Taylor and Pender were locked up on holding charges, but were later released. A few days after Berriman’s death Murray was charged with his murder and on 14th of April 1924, he was executed in the Melbourne Gaol. Murray stood on the scaffold and made the following statement: “Never in my life have I done anything to justify the extreme penalty being passed upon me. I have prayed hard for those who have acted against me, and I hope that those whom I have injured will forgive me.” Turning to the hangman as the rope was passed around his neck, he said: “Pull it tight.” Murray’s death was instantaneous.

 

During its operation, the gaol was the setting for 133 hangings. The most infamous was that of bushranger Ned Kelly at the age of 25, on 11 November 1880. After a two-day trial, Kelly was convicted of killing a police officer. As stated by law at the time, executed prisoners were buried (without head) in unmarked graves in the gaol burial yard. The head was normally removed from the body as part of the phrenological study of hanged felons. Historian and associate professor of Wollongong University John McQuilton states that the lack of monitoring for burial processes was odd, given Victorian society’s normally brilliant attention to detail. The first hanging of a woman in Victoria, Elizabeth Scott, was performed in the prison on 11 November 1863 – along with her co-accused, Julian Cross and David Gedge. The last person to be executed was Angus Murray in 1924, the same year the gaol was closed.

ON THIS DAY………..14th of April 1924

ANGUS MURRAY

Angus Murray was last to be executed in old Melbourne Gaol, a bank robber and murderer, in 1924. After the Melbourne prison closed, the hanging beam and the hangings were taken to Pentridge Prison, in what’s now a suburb of Melbourne. The beam came back to Old Melbourne Gaol in 2000.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 2, 1924

Angus Murray was sentenced to death by Mr. Justice Mann in the Criminal Court on the 2nd of February 1924. Murray was charged with the murder of Thomas Reginald Victor Berryman, a bank manager at Glenferrie, on October the 8th. After deliberating for two hours the jury returned a verdict of guilty and at 6pm the death sentence was passed. The jury were taken to the Glenferrie railway station, where the outrage and robbery occurred. When the jury returned to announced their verdict Murray was asked the customary question whether he had anything to say while sentence of death should not be passed on him. Murray asked for leave to consult his solicitor; Mr Gorman immediately rose and said, “There is nothing useful that I can say on his behalf at this stage.’ Murray heard the sentence of death without any outward display of feeling. Murray was the last person to be executed at the Old Melbourne Gaol.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 4th November 1922

Concerts at Geelong Gaol

Since the escape of Angus Murray from Geelong gaol there has been a ban on the fortnightly concerts that were formerly held in the gaol for the entertainment of the prisoners. The Inspector-General has now issued instructions that the concerts may again be held , and with the object of reverting to the former practice it has been decided to hold a concert on the afternoon of Saturday, November 10. The assistance of vocal and other artists is desired. Visitors will notice that the surroundings of the gaol have been improved, as the painters and decorators have renovated and decorated the interior of the building. Angus Murray’s cell has been repaired, and peace and order seem to again prevail. The prisoners’ choir master (Angus Murrray) will be succeeded by another prisoner who shows vocal power. It is not generally known that among the prisoners are several men who can contribute an entertainment.

ON THIS DAY…… 22nd October 1923

On the 24th of August 1923, Angus Murray, who is serving a sentence of 15 years for robbery under arms, mace his escape, by mean’s of a small saw, he removed of the stones at the base of his window. The bars were then loosened, leaving him sufficient room to squeeze through. Murray torn his bedclothes into shreds to form a rope to lower himself to the ground. He was then able to scale the outside wall were a motor car which was waiting for him. A boy, passing the Gaol at the time of the escape saw Murray clamber down from his cell and spring into a car. The police scoured the district, but could not find any trace of the fugitive. On the morning of the 9th of October 1923, Murray shoot Mr Berriman the manager of the Glenferrie branch of the Commercial Bank and robbed him of £1851. Berriman died the on the 22nd of October. A large force of detectives raided, a house in St, Kilda at 5am, arresting Angus Murray, Leslie (Squlazy) Taylor, and Ida Pender. Angus Murray was charged with the Glenferrie robbery and with escaping from custody. Taylor and Pender were locked up on holding charges, but wore later released. A few days after Berriman’s death Murray was charged with his murder and on 14th of April 1924, he was executed in the Melbourne Gaol. Murray stood on the scaffold and made the following statement: “Never in my life have I done anything to justify the extreme penalty being passed upon me. I have prayed hard for those who have acted against me, and I hope that those whom I have injured will forgive me.” Turning to the hangman as the rope was passed around his neck, he said: “Pull it tight.” Murray’s death was instantaneous.

 

On This Day – October 20, 1923

Mr. T. R. V. Berriman, who was shot and robbed at Glenferrie on October 8, died in a private hospital on October 20.

After consulting with the chief commissioner of police (Mr. Nicholson) the Chief Secretary (Dr. Argyle) announced that the Ministry had decided to offer a reward of £500 for information which would lead to the arrest and conviction of Richard Buckley, for whom the police are searching in connection with the Glenferrie robbery. The police arc confident that they will soon make an arrest.

Angus Murray, aged 42 years, a clerk, who, had been in custody on a charge of robbery has been charged with the murder, of Berriman.

Leslie Taylor has been charged with having harboured and maintained Angus Murray and Richard Buckley, knowing that they were concerned with the shooting of T. R. V. Berriman, and also with having been, both before and after, an accessory to the felony committed at Glenferrie 011 October 8. An application for bail was refused by the bench.

On This Day ……. 24th of August 1923

On the 24th of August 1923, Angus Murray, who is serving a sentence of 15 years for robbery under arms, made his escape, by means of a small saw, he removed the stones at the base of his window. The bars were then loosened, leaving him sufficient room to squeeze through. Murray had torn his bedclothes into shreds to form a rope to lower himself to the ground. He was then able to scale the outside wall were a motor car was waiting for him. A boy, passing the Gaol at the time of the escape saw Murray clamber down from his cell and spring into a car. The police scoured the district, but could not find any trace of the fugitive. On the morning of the 9th of October 1923, Murray shot Mr Berriman the manager of the Glenferrie branch of the Commercial Bank and robbed him of £1851. Berriman died the on the 22nd of October. A large force of detectives raided, a house in St, Kilda at 5am, arresting Angus Murray, Leslie (Squizzy) Taylor, and Ida Pender. Angus Murray was charged with the Glenferrie robbery and with escaping from custody. Taylor and Pender were locked up on holding charges, but were later released. A few days after Berriman’s death Murray was charged with his murder and on 14th of April 1924, he was executed in the Melbourne Gaol. Murray stood on the scaffold and made the following statement: “Never in my life have I done anything to justify the extreme penalty being passed upon me. I have prayed hard for those who have acted against me, and I hope that those whom I have injured will forgive me.” Turning to the hangman as the rope was passed around his neck, he said: “Pull it tight.” Murray’s death was instantaneous.

 

During its operation, the gaol was the setting for 133 hangings. The most infamous was that of bushranger Ned Kelly at the age of 25, on 11 November 1880. After a two-day trial, Kelly was convicted of killing a police officer. As stated by law at the time, executed prisoners were buried (without head) in unmarked graves in the gaol burial yard. The head was normally removed from the body as part of the phrenological study of hanged felons. Historian and associate professor of Wollongong University John McQuilton states that the lack of monitoring for burial processes was odd, given Victorian society’s normally brilliant attention to detail. The first hanging of a woman in Victoria, Elizabeth Scott, was performed in the prison on 11 November 1863 – along with her co-accused, Julian Cross and David Gedge. The last person to be executed was Angus Murray in 1924, the same year the gaol was closed.