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Melbourne – February 1st, 1946

The recent heat wave in Melbourne is thought to have been responsible for the death of ‘three of the quintuplets born to the lioness Jinja at the Zoo.

The births are an Australian and possibly a world record. Zoo officials are now desperately striving to save the lives of the two surviving cubs.

In addition to the three lion cubs, the two platypuses. Hero and Leander were also victims of the heat wave. Like the platypuses at the Healesville sanctuary. Hero and Leander had attracted world-wide interest.

Well we might be a little bit late to the new year this year!!  But nevertheless Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!

In our defence we have been busy in the background finding and securing some new adventures for the Twisted History for this year, some we will be letting you know about very soon!  As well as busily providing ghost tours and paranormal investigations at Geelong Gaol and murder tours in Melbourne’s Chinatown.

Back to our blog!!  This year we will be doing things a little differently.  For the past couple of years we have been blogging snippets from history that happened “On This Day.  This year we will be doing “Sunday Spotlights” instead.  This will allow us to provide more details (where we can!) on some of the events we will be writing about.

But we would like your input!

As some of you would know we have a few different categories that we blog about – these include Murders, Goals, Hotels, Pop Culture and of course Twisted History.

This year we want to hear from you! Which Australian murder cases fascinate you?  Is there a particular Australian movie or TV show you want to know more about?  Is there an urban legend that gives you a chuckle?  Or even a good ghost story we haven’t heard?  Is your local hotel haunted?  Is there something paranormal you want to discuss?  We want to hear it all!

If you have some ideas for blog articles – get in touch!  You can email us at twistedhistoryvictoria@gmail.com, you can inbox us on any of our facebook pages or give us a call on 1300865800.

We do have some stories going up starting tonight and we look forward to hearing your thoughts!

Welcome to 2018!!

 

 

On this day …….. 8th of December 1932

Shortly after the arrival at the Melbourne Zoo of a pair of young chimpanzees, two keepers each received a smack in the eye. Another was pulled off a ladder, and a fourth attendant narrowly escaped a blow from a billet of wood. The director of the zoo (Mr. Wilkie) said that he was sure the new arrivals would shortly be “star” performers at the zoo. The newcomers rose with the dawn on this day in 1932, and immediately howled loudly for their breakfast. Mr. Wilkie heard the noise from his home, and hurried down with four raw eggs, two slices of bread and jam, two pieces of cake, several bananas, and two oranges.

On This Day……… 2nd April 1945

A police force equipped with rifles was called out at 3am on the 2nd of April 1945, to fight two tigers and a mandrill (a large sized monkey) which escaped from their cages 21 miles from Inverell. The animals belonged to Perry Bros. Circus, and the cages were smashed in a road accident. When the police arrived at the scene they heard a woman screaming in, a house some distance from the road. In the bright moonlight they saw one tiger coming from the direction of the house, and Sergeant Toone and Constable Moore both scored fatal hits. A second tiger was then seen tearing at the body of the mandrill, which it had killed. When it came bounding towards the police officers, Sergeant Toone and Constable Book scored bull’s eyes. The tiger jumped high in the air with a roar and crashed to death. The screaming woman was Mrs W. Dean, who was in the house with four children. Her husband was away rabbiting. A year-old baby was sleeping with Mrs, Dean, and two boys and a girl, aged 10, eight and three, were sleeping on the open verandah. She saw the tiger when she rose to investigate the fierce barking of a dog, and was just in time to see the animal leap in the fowl run and kill a number of fowls. In a frenzy she dashed for the children. She bundled her daughter inside from the back verandah and her sons from the front verandah, slamming the front door in the tiger’s face as it ambled up the pathway. She closed all windows and barricaded the door. She heard the tiger slump down at the door as though to guard. It went away just as the police arrived by car. The tigers were valued at £300 each, and the mandrill at £500. They are a serious loss to the circus people.

 

 

On this day …….. 8th of December 1932

Shortly after the arrival at the Melbourne Zoo of a pair of young chimpanzees, two keepers each received a smack in the eye. Another was pulled off a ladder, and a fourth attendant narrowly escaped a blow from a billet of wood. The director of the zoo (Mr. Wilkie) said that he was sure the new arrivals would shortly be “star” performers at the zoo. The newcomers rose with the dawn on this day in 1932, and immediately howled loudly for their breakfast. Mr. Wilkie heard the noise from his home, and hurried down with four raw eggs, two slices of bread and jam, two pieces of cake, several bananas, and two oranges.

On This Day……… 2nd April 1945

A police force equipped with, rifles was called out at 3am on the 2nd of April 1945, to fight two tigers and a mandrill (a large sized; monkey) which escaped from their cages 21 miles from Inverell. The animals belonged to Perry Bros.’ Circus, and the cages were smashed in a road accident. When the police arrived at the scene they heard a woman screaming in, a house some distance from the road. In the bright moonlight they saw one tiger coming from the direction of the house, and Sergeant Toone and Constable Moore both scored fatal hits. A second tiger was then seen tearing at the body of the mandrill, which it had killed. When it came bounding towards the police officers, Sergeant Toone and Constable Book scored bull’s eyes’. The tiger jumped high in the air with a roar and crashed to death. The screaming woman was Mrs W. Dean, who was in the house with four children. Her husband, was away rabbiting. A year-old baby was sleeping with Mrs, Dean, and two boys and a girl, aged 10, eight and three, were sleeping on the open verandah. She saw the tiger when she rose to investigate the fleece barking of a dog, and was just in time to see the animal leap in the fowl run and kill a number of fowls. In a frenzy she dashed for the children. She bundled her daughter in side from the back verandah and her sons from the front verandah, slamming the front door in the tiger’s face as it ambled up the pathway. She closed all windows and barricaded the door. She heard, the tiger slump down at the door as though to guard. It went away just as the police arrived by car. The tigers were valued at £300 each, and the mandrill at £500. They are a serious loss to the circus people.

 

 

Richmond

12325132_221240768207059_1179965847_nAn escaped elephant from Wirth’s Circus’ temporary camp outside Olympic Park in Richmond caused a mild panic on the 29th October 1954. At 9.30 p.m. a check was made by the boys guarding the elephants, and it was found that one was missing. Then telephone calls started to pour into Russell St. police station from people on their way home from the city saying that they had seen an elephant walking along Batman Ave. A police car was rushed to the scene and after a two and a half hour search they found the missing elephant. It was standing under a tree about 200yds away from the camp.

This farmland, approximately 15 miles from Wangaratta at the foot of the Warby Ranges, became the Jubilee Golf Club in the 1960s, kangaroos still come down to the golf course to feed in the evening.
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ZOO CHIMPANZEES PLAY UP12355147_220239394973863_954239108_n

Shortly after the arrival at the Melbourne Zoo of a pair of young chimpanzees, two keepers each received a smack in the eye. Another was pulled off a ladder, and a fourth attendant narrowly escaped a blow from a billet of wood. The director of the zoo (Mr. Wilkie) said that he was sure the new arrivals would shortly be “star” performers at the zoo. The newcomers rose with the dawn on this day in 1932, and immediately howled loudly for their breakfast. Mr. Wilkie heard the noise from his home, and hurried down with four raw eggs, two slices of bread and jam, two pieces of cake, several bananas, and two oranges.

imageMelbourne Zoo officials were startled on the 3rd of August 1932, when Queenie the elephant, who had been breakfasting peacefully, suddenly stamped and trumpeting loudly from her house. Quivering from head to foot, her trunk raised aloft, she presented a picture of absurd dismay. The cause of her hysteria was a small possum which had dropped from the beams of the elephant house on to her back.