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ON THIS DAY – October 8, 1942

George Frederick Wellington Maes, 35, a member of the CMF, pleaded not guilty in the Bendigo Supreme Court yesterday to a charge of having murdered his wife, Olive Freda Maes, 20, and their 10-month-old son, at Boort, on October 8.

Maes, in evidence, said his wife used to nag him. She often had  said that if she did not have the baby she would go to dances while he was on duty. On October 8 he saw her hitting the child about the head with a waddy. He tried to stop her, but she ran out of the room. He followed and she swung the waddy at him. He picked up a pea rifle and, without taking aim, pulled the trigger. She fell and he dragged her into another room. When he saw her eyes move he reloaded the rifle and fired another shot into her forehead as he did not want her to be in agony. He did not kill the child.

The case was adjourned.

 

 

ON THIS DAY……. 24th May 1941

A Jury in the Bendigo Supreme Court found Antonio Guida (47), market gardener, of Dhurringile, near Tatura, not guilty of a charge of having murdered Angelo Carrafa (45), market gardener, on May 24. Guida was also found not guilty of manslaughter. Mr. Justice Gavan Duffy discharged him Guida, in evidence, said that when he was about to go to work he heard a quarrel Leo Carrafa, a son of the deceased, came to him and told him that his father was killing his brother Michele Carrafa. Witness took up his gun like a stick and did not know that it was loaded. As he lifted it he heard the words: “I will kill you.” He saw Angelo Carrafa with his hand raised about to strike. He did not pull the trigger with the intention of firing the gun.

Bendigo Supreme Court, Antonio Guida, Dhurringile, Tatura, murder, Angelo Carrafa, market gardener, manslaughter, Mr. Justice Gavan Duffy

ON THIS DAY – April 4, 1954

BENDIGO

After finding a 31-year-old mother of four children not guilty of murdering her husband, a Bendigo Supreme Court jury decided that she was guilty of manslaughter. The woman, Mrs. Dorothy Beck, of Bendigo, was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment. Mrs. Beck had pleaded not guilty to the charge of having Murdered her husband, Ivan Edward Beck, 30, a quarry worker, at their home on the 4th of April.

 

ON THIS DAY – April 2, 1936

BENDIGO

SHOT FIRED – MURDER CHARGE FAILS.

In the Bendigo Supreme Court, Harry White, 55, labourer, was charged with the murder of William Chandler (40), labourer, who died in the Bendigo Hospital on the 2nd of April, as the result of a bullet wound in the stomach. Evidence showed that on the night of February 19, Chandler went home under the influence of liquor. He had an altercation with his wife and children, who left the house. Chandler followed, caught up with his wife, and kicked and punched her. When White came along Chandler punched his wife on his shoulder; then a shot was fired, and he fell. The main point raised at the trial was whether the case was one of justifiable homicide. The jury found the accused not guilty of murder, and also acquitted him of the alternative charge of manslaughter.

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 27th March 1926

Arthur Abel Angove, employed as a groom at Glenloth Station, near Wycheproof, was found not guilty of the murder of James McDonald, a fellow employee, on the 27th of March and was discharged. It was alleged that following an altercation at the station on the morning of March 27 between McDonald and the wife of the accused, McDonald had pushed the lady to the floor of the hallway and dragged her by the legs to the kitchen before forcibly placed Mrs. Angove’s head under a water tap whereupon the accused had shot him. Before being tried in the Bendigo Supreme Court, Angove was housed in the Wycheproof police cells (now at the Swan Hill Pioneer Village).

 

ON THIS DAY – March 1, 1908

A young Wedderburn footballer named James Fanning was in the Bendigo Supreme Court charged with having murdered Albert Loch Taylor at Wedderburn on the 1st of March. Evidence was given that the prisoner had in the Royal Hotel, Wedderburn, on the night of the 29th of February, commenced a dispute with Taylor as to who should pay for liquor which had been ordered. The prisoner, though not drunk, was excitable. Taylor was sitting on a form, and the prisoner took up a billiard cue and made several hits at him. He then knocked Taylor off his seat. Taylor retaliated, and struck Fanning on the eye. Both men close and the prisoner fell on top of Taylor. When the antagonists were separated Taylor proceeded towards, the passage, when the prisoner struck him violently on the head, and he subsequently died. The jury, after a short retirement, returned a verdict of manslaughter, and the prisoner was remanded for sentence.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 19, 1936

Bendigo

In the Bendigo Supreme Court, Harry White, 55, labourer, was charged with the murder of William Chandler 40, labourer, who died in the Bendigo Hospital on April the 2nd, as the result of a bullet wound in the stomach. Evidence showed that on the night of February the 19th, Chandler went home under the influence of liquor. He had an altercation with his wife and children, who left the house. Chandler followed, caught up with his wife, and kicked and punched her. When White came along Chandler punched his wife on her shoulder and a shot was fired, and he fell. The main point raised at the trial was whether the case was one of justifiable homicide. The jury found the accused not guilty of murder, and also acquitted him of the alternative charge of manslaughter.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 8, 1942

George Frederick Wellington Maes, 35, a member of the CMF, pleaded not guilty in the Bendigo Supreme Court yesterday to a charge of having murdered his wife, Olive Freda Maes, 20, and their 10-month-old son, at Boort, on October 8.

Maes, in evidence, said his wife used to nag him. She often had  said that if she did not have the baby she would go to dances while he was on duty. On October 8 he saw her hitting the child about the head with a waddy. He tried to stop her, but she ran out of the room. He followed and she swung the waddy at him. He picked up a pea rifle and, without taking aim, pulled the trigger. She fell and he dragged her into another room. When he saw her eyes move he reloaded the rifle and fired another shot into her forehead as he did not want her to be in agony. He did not kill the child.

The case was adjourned.

 

 

ON THIS DAY……. 24th May 1941

A Jury in the Bendigo Supreme Court found Antonio Guida (47), market gardener, of Dhurringile, near Tatura, not guilty of a charge of having murdered Angelo Carrafa (45), market gardener, on May 24. Guida was also found not guilty of manslaughter. Mr. Justice Gavan Duffy discharged him Guida, in evidence, said that when he was about to go to work he heard a quarrel Leo Carrafa, a son of the deceased, came to him and told him that his father was killing his brother Michele Carrafa. Witness took up his gun like a stick and did not know that it was loaded. As he lifted it he heard the words: “I will kill you.” He saw Angelo Carrafa with his hand raised about to strike. He did not pull the trigger with the intention of firing the gun.

Bendigo Supreme Court, Antonio Guida, Dhurringile, Tatura, murder, Angelo Carrafa, market gardener, manslaughter, Mr. Justice Gavan Duffy

ON THIS DAY – April 4, 1954

BENDIGO

After finding a 31-year-old mother of four children not guilty of murdering her husband, a Bendigo Supreme Court jury decided that she was guilty of manslaughter. The woman, Mrs. Dorothy Beck, of Bendigo, was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment. Mrs. Beck had pleaded not guilty to the charge of having Murdered her husband, Ivan Edward Beck, 30, a quarry worker, at their home on the 4th of April.

 

ON THIS DAY – April 2, 1936

BENDIGO

SHOT FIRED – MURDER CHARGE FAILS.

In the Bendigo Supreme Court, Harry White, 55, labourer, was charged with the murder of William Chandler (40), labourer, who died in the Bendigo Hospital on the 2nd of April, as the result of a bullet wound in the stomach. Evidence showed that on the night of February 19, Chandler went home under the influence of liquor. He had an altercation with his wife and children, who left the house. Chandler followed, caught up with his wife, and kicked and punched her. When White came along Chandler punched his wife on his shoulder; then a shot was fired, and he fell. The main point raised at the trial was whether the case was one of justifiable homicide. The jury found the accused not guilty of murder, and also acquitted him of the alternative charge of manslaughter.

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 27th March 1926

Arthur Abel Angove, employed as a groom at Glenloth Station, near Wycheproof, was found not guilty of the murder of James McDonald, a fellow employee, on the 27th of March and was discharged. It was alleged that following an altercation at the station on the morning of March 27 between McDonald and the wife of the accused, McDonald had pushed the lady to the floor of the hallway and dragged her by the legs to the kitchen before forcibly placed Mrs. Angove’s head under a water tap whereupon the accused had shot him. Before being tried in the Bendigo Supreme Court, Angove was housed in the Wycheproof police cells (now at the Swan Hill Pioneer Village).