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On this day …….. 9th of July 1894

A leading player from the Kelly drama of a decade earlier appeared in the Melbourne Court on this day in 1894. Alexander Fitzpatrick, the form police constable who had set off the Kelly outbreak in 1878, appeared to face charge of obtaining money by false pretences, by presenting a dud cheque to the licensee of the Scaracen’s Head Hotel in Bourke Street, Melbourne. He was committed for trail and subsequently sentenced to twelve months gaol.

 

On this day …….. 1st September 1894

A panic occurred in Bourke street, Melbourne on the 1st of September 1894, owing to the elephants drawing the lions cage in Fillis Circus procession taking fright. The animals bolted down the street at a great pace, dragging the roaring lions after them, and finally came to a stand still by contact with a lamp post which was dragged away. The cage was uninjured and the lions including Pasha the one eyed lion although greatly excited was unable to Succour their liberty.

 

On this day …….. 9th of July 1894

A leading player from the Kelly drama of a decade earlier appeared in the Melbourne Court on this day in 1894. Alexander Fitzpatrick, the form police constable who had set off the Kelly outbreak in 1878, appeared to face charge of obtaining money by false pretences, by presenting a dud cheque to the licensee of the Scaracen’s Head Hotel in Bourke Street, Melbourne. He was committed for trail and subsequently sentenced to twelve months gaol.

 

On This Day ……. 10th May 1900

An assault of a most unprovoked character was committed outside of Menzies’ hotel, in Bourke street, Melbourne on this day in 1900, the assailant being a man named Patrick Prendereast. Whilst Michael Gosa a warder in the Geelong gaol, was passing in front of the hotel, he was suddenly struck-by Prendergast a violent blow. Turning round, Goss saw his assailant in a fighting attitude, but before Prendergast could deliver another blow, Goss had grappled him and thrown him down. At the City Court, Prendergast was charged with unlawful assault, and sentenced to three months’ imprisonment.

 

EXECUTION THIS DAY – May 4, 1865

MELBOURNE

The execution of Joseph Brown, who at the last Criminal sitting of the Supreme Court was sentenced to death for the murder of Emanuel Jacobs on March 22, at the Whittington Tavern Bourke-street, took place at the Melbourne gaol, in presence of about twenty spectators. At an early hour the prisoner was removed from the cell which he had been occupying since sentence was passed to one adjoining the new drop, and he was attended by the gaol chaplain up to the moment of execution. At ten o’clock the deputy-sheriff (Mr. L. Ellis), accompanied by the governor of the gaol, entered the cell of the prisoner, and informed him that the hour had come. He stepped outside on to the gallery, where he was pinioned by the hangman. After he had taken his place upon the drop, and the rope had been adjusted, he asked if he might speak a few words, and being answered in the affirmative, he offered a prayer that he might be strengthened in what he had to pass through. Then addressing the persons present as “good people,” he declared that he was as guilty as ever a man was, but in so far as intention to kill the man was concerned, be was as innocent as a child unborn. He had no recollection whatever of the act, and could not think how he came to bare the knife in his hand. He was in the habit of smoking, and supposed that be had been cutting tobacco. After alluding to the statement of one of the witnesses, who at the inquest had said that he (prisoner) was not drunk at the time, a statement which he said was untrue, he hoped that he would be forgiven for what he had said. He complained that he had been represented to have had something to do with the robbery about which the quarrel arose. He had had nothing at all to do with it, although he was standing at the door, and saw what passed. The landlord saw it as well as he did, and would have told the troth about it, had he not been afraid of losing his licence. The prisoner’s manner was marked by great trepidation; he trembled very much, and at times his remarks became confused and almost inaudible. At the conclusion of his observations the chaplain repeated the burial service aloud. The bolt was immediately drawn by the executioner, and death took place instantaneously, scarcely even the slightest spasmodic action being visible after the drop fell. The body was allowed to hang for the usual time, after which the inquest was held, and the ordinary formal verdict retained. The prisoner was described in the gaol books as aged forty-three years. Ha arrived in this colony in 1842. He was a native of England and his calling was that of labourer.

ON THIS DAY – April 22, 1912

MELBOURNE

On the 22nd of April 1912, Thomas Nugent, aged 73 years, died in Melbourne Hospital from injuries sustained from a fall in Bourke-street, the result of a blow struck by another man during a fight. At the inquiry the Coroner recorded a verdict of manslaughter against a man not yet known.

 

EXECUTED ON THIS DAY ………. 23rd of March 1891

John Wilson, age 23 was executed in Old Melbourne gaol

John Wilson, a tram conductor, was engaged to 24-year-old domestic servant Stella Leah Marks. On the 24th of January 1891, he saw her walking arm in arm with another man in Bourke street and on seeing this he became jealous. On the next day he demanded an explanation, and some words passed between them. In the evening, he accompanied her to her home at Clifton Hill and asked her to go for a walk. He again demanded explanation about the other man and became enraged. Wilson would cut her throat, killing her instantly. Then he tried to commit suicide, but lacked courage to do so. He was charged with murder, stood trial at the Melbourne Criminal Court and was convicted and sentenced to death on the 25th of February 1891. Wilson was hanged at Melbourne gaol at 10am on the 23rd of March 1891.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 21, 1910

Melbourne

A brawl which occurred in Bourke street shortly before 11pm resulted in the death of a man named Gerald Hagg, aged 30 years. The deceased, who was a labourer, had a quarrel with a friend named Allan Snowden, a wicker worker aged 26 years. The pair were under the influence of drink, and those standing about took little notice of them. Suddenly Hagg was seen to reel before a blow and fall on his neck in the roadway. He was unconscious when picked up, and on his arrival at the hospital life was pronounced extinct. Snowden was subsequently arrested on a charge of wilful murder. Very little can be ascertained about Snowden and Hagg, except that they were known to have been friends for many years. The subject of tonight’s quarrel is believed to be of old standing.

 

 

On this day …….. 1st September 1894

A panic occurred in Bourke street, Melbourne on the 1st of September 1894, owing to the elephants drawing the lions cage in Fillis Circus procession taking fright. The animals bolted down the street at a great pace, dragging the roaring lions after them, and finally came to a stand still by contact with a lamp post which was dragged away. The cage was uninjured and the lions including Pasha the one eyed lion although greatly excited was unable to Succour their liberty.

 

On this day …….. 9th of July 1894

A leading player from the Kelly drama of a decade earlier appeared in the Melbourne Court on this day in 1894. Alexander Fitzpatrick, the form police constable who had set off the Kelly outbreak in 1878, appeared to face charge of obtaining money by false pretences, by presenting a dud cheque to the licensee of the Scaracen’s Head Hotel in Bourke Street, Melbourne. He was committed for trail and subsequently sentenced to twelve months gaol.

 

On This Day ……. 10th May 1900

An assault of a most unprovoked character was committed outside of Menzies’ hotel, in Bourke street, Melbourne on this day in 1900, the assailant being a man named Patrick Prendereast. Whilst Michael Gosa a warder in the Geelong gaol, was passing in front of the hotel, he was suddenly struck-by Prendergast a violent blow. Turning round, Goss saw his assailant in a fighting attitude, but before Prendergast could deliver another blow, Goss had grappled him and thrown him down. At the City Court, Prendergast was charged with unlawful assault, and sentenced to three months’ imprisonment.

 

EXECUTION THIS DAY – May 4, 1865

MELBOURNE

The execution of Joseph Brown, who at the last Criminal sitting of the Supreme Court was sentenced to death for the murder of Emanuel Jacobs on March 22, at the Whittington Tavern Bourke-street, took place at the Melbourne gaol, in presence of about twenty spectators. At an early hour the prisoner was removed from the cell which he had been occupying since sentence was passed to one adjoining the new drop, and he was attended by the gaol chaplain up to the moment of execution. At ten o’clock the deputy-sheriff (Mr. L. Ellis), accompanied by the governor of the gaol, entered the cell of the prisoner, and informed him that the hour had come. He stepped outside on to the gallery, where he was pinioned by the hangman. After he had taken his place upon the drop, and the rope had been adjusted, he asked if he might speak a few words, and being answered in the affirmative, he offered a prayer that he might be strengthened in what he had to pass through. Then addressing the persons present as “good people,” he declared that he was as guilty as ever a man was, but in so far as intention to kill the man was concerned, be was as innocent as a child unborn. He had no recollection whatever of the act, and could not think how he came to bare the knife in his hand. He was in the habit of smoking, and supposed that be had been cutting tobacco. After alluding to the statement of one of the witnesses, who at the inquest had said that he (prisoner) was not drunk at the time, a statement which he said was untrue, he hoped that he would be forgiven for what he had said. He complained that he had been represented to have had something to do with the robbery about which the quarrel arose. He had had nothing at all to do with it, although he was standing at the door, and saw what passed. The landlord saw it as well as he did, and would have told the troth about it, had he not been afraid of losing his licence. The prisoner’s manner was marked by great trepidation; he trembled very much, and at times his remarks became confused and almost inaudible. At the conclusion of his observations the chaplain repeated the burial service aloud. The bolt was immediately drawn by the executioner, and death took place instantaneously, scarcely even the slightest spasmodic action being visible after the drop fell. The body was allowed to hang for the usual time, after which the inquest was held, and the ordinary formal verdict retained. The prisoner was described in the gaol books as aged forty-three years. Ha arrived in this colony in 1842. He was a native of England and his calling was that of labourer.