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On this day …….. 31st of October 1894

Opening on 26 September 1855, the New South Wales railway, Australia, was the first government-owned railway in the British Empire. The first line ran the 22km from Sydney to Parramatta. By 1862, the western line had reached Penrith. The railway continued to expand, reaching Albury in 1881, Glen Innes in 1884 and far west New South Wales at Bourke in 1886. On 31 October 1894, a country train bound for Goulburn, New South Wales, was hit at Redfern, Sydney, by a suburban train heading from Strathfield to the city. Two engine crew and twelve passengers from the suburban train were killed, and twenty-seven people were injured. The accident was caused by an incorrectly set signal. Among those killed were Edward Lloyd Jones, Chairman of David Jones & Co and son of the founder of the David Jones department store chain. Also killed was Father Callaghan McCarthy, Dean of St Mary’s Cathedral.

 

On this day ………… 7th February 1829

 

During an expedition exploring inland Australia, Captain Charles Sturt recorded an unusual phenomenon. It occurred on this day in 1829 near the location of present day town of Bourke in New South Wales. They had stopped in flat, wooded country on a clear, calm day when the party heard a cannon like noise coming from five to six miles away. No one was sure which direction the sound had come from. One of the party climbed a tree to get a better view but saw nothing. To the end of Sturts’ days, it remained a mystery.

 

On this day ………… 2nd February 1829

Captain Charles Sturt was born in India in 1795. He came to Australia in 1827, and soon after undertook to solve the mystery of where the inland rivers of New South Wales flowed. Because they appeared to flow towards the centre of the continent, the belief was held that they emptied into an inland sea. Drawing on the skills of experienced bushman and explorer Hamilton Hume, Sturt departed in late 1828 to trace the Macquarie River. Following the Macquarie inland, they came to a smaller river which, due to the drought, was merely a series of waterholes. This was the Bogan, named after an Aboriginal word meaning “birthplace of a king”. Sturt followed the Bogan downstream past the site of today’s Bourke, until he arrived suddenly at what he described as “a noble river”, on the 2nd of February 1829. This was the Darling, which Sturt named after Governor Darling. The discovery of the Darling brought a new element to the mystery of the rivers: its banks clearly showed that during flood-times, it would carry huge amounts of water. It remained to be determined whether the river drained into an inland sea to the southwest, or whether it flowed elsewhere.

 

 

On this day …….. 30th of January 1854

On this day in 1854, Cobb & Co’s horse drawn coaches made their first run, departing Melbourne for the Forest Creek diggings (now Castlemaine) and Bendigo. The network of routes was quickly expanded to deal with increased demand in the growing colony of Victoria. Initially a passenger service, Cobb & Co’s reputation for speed and reliable service soon saw it being used for mail delivery and gold escort as well. Headquarters were moved from Victoria to Bathurst in 1862. Workshops were built at Hay and Bourke in New South Wales and Castlemaine in Victoria, and the service was expanded to include Queensland. Horses were replaced at changing stations 25 to 40 kilometres apart, meaning that fresher horses improved travelling time. Today Cobb and co still run a net work of buses across Australia.

 

 

On this day …….. 31st of October 1894

Opening on 26 September 1855, the New South Wales railway, Australia, was the first government-owned railway in the British Empire. The first line ran the 22km from Sydney to Parramatta. By 1862, the western line had reached Penrith. The railway continued to expand, reaching Albury in 1881, Glen Innes in 1884 and far west New South Wales at Bourke in 1886. On 31 October 1894, a country train bound for Goulburn, New South Wales, was hit at Redfern, Sydney, by a suburban train heading from Strathfield to the city. Two engine crew and twelve passengers from the suburban train were killed, and twenty-seven people were injured. The accident was caused by an incorrectly set signal. Among those killed were Edward Lloyd Jones, Chairman of David Jones & Co and son of the founder of the David Jones department store chain. Also killed was Father Callaghan McCarthy, Dean of St Mary’s Cathedral.

 

On this day ………… 7th February 1829

 

During an expedition exploring inland Australia, Captain Charles Sturt recorded an unusual phenomenon. It occurred on this day in 1829 near the location of present day town of Bourke in New South Wales. They had stopped in flat, wooded country on a clear, calm day when the party heard a cannon like noise coming from five to six miles away. No one was sure which direction the sound had come from. One of the party climbed a tree to get a better view but saw nothing. To the end of Sturts’ days, it remained a mystery.

 

On this day ………… 2nd February 1829

Captain Charles Sturt was born in India in 1795. He came to Australia in 1827, and soon after undertook to solve the mystery of where the inland rivers of New South Wales flowed. Because they appeared to flow towards the centre of the continent, the belief was held that they emptied into an inland sea. Drawing on the skills of experienced bushman and explorer Hamilton Hume, Sturt departed in late 1828 to trace the Macquarie River. Following the Macquarie inland, they came to a smaller river which, due to the drought, was merely a series of waterholes. This was the Bogan, named after an Aboriginal word meaning “birthplace of a king”. Sturt followed the Bogan downstream past the site of today’s Bourke, until he arrived suddenly at what he described as “a noble river”, on the 2nd of February 1829. This was the Darling, which Sturt named after Governor Darling. The discovery of the Darling brought a new element to the mystery of the rivers: its banks clearly showed that during flood-times, it would carry huge amounts of water. It remained to be determined whether the river drained into an inland sea to the southwest, or whether it flowed elsewhere.

 

 

On this day …….. 30th of January 1854

On this day in 1854, Cobb & Co’s horse drawn coaches made their first run, departing Melbourne for the Forest Creek diggings (now Castlemaine) and Bendigo. The network of routes was quickly expanded to deal with increased demand in the growing colony of Victoria. Initially a passenger service, Cobb & Co’s reputation for speed and reliable service soon saw it being used for mail delivery and gold escort as well. Headquarters were moved from Victoria to Bathurst in 1862. Workshops were built at Hay and Bourke in New South Wales and Castlemaine in Victoria, and the service was expanded to include Queensland. Horses were replaced at changing stations 25 to 40 kilometres apart, meaning that fresher horses improved travelling time. Today Cobb and co still run a net work of buses across Australia.