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ON THIS DAY – July 30, 1947

When acquaintances of Allan William Paul Rose, poultry farmer, of Seamore Road, Box Hill, entered his house on July 30, last, they found him dead with his skull battered as a result of 17 injuries. Today, Alexander Arthur Fleming (28), of Cairo Road, Box Hill, builder’s laborer, was charged with having murdered Rose. The case came before Mr. Justice McFarlan and jury in the Criminal Court. Among exhibits was a piece of iron about 18 inches in length. The Crown alleged that this was the weapon which was used to batter Rose’s skull. Mr. Sproule, K.C., for the Crown, said Rose lived by himself in a little cottage in a rather isolated portion of the street. On Tuesday, July 29, he was seen going to the pictures in Box Hill, as was his custom of a Tuesday night. This was the last time he was seen alive by anyone except his assailant. About 10 o’clock next morning a man called at Rose’s house and saw a hat under the hedge. He received no answer to his call. Later in the day he called again, and found the works of a wristlet watch on the concrete drive. The watch had stopped at 11.20 o’clock. With another man, he entered the house. He found Rose dead on the floor, which was covered with blood. Mr. Sproule said that when Fleming was first questioned by the police, he admitted borrowing £2 from Rose. Later, to Detective Mooney, Fleming said: “Yes, I did it and I admit it.” Mr. Sproule said Fleming made a statement to the police in which he allegedly said he approached Rose on the night of July 29 with a request for a loan, which was refused. The alleged statement described a fight between Rose and Fleming. In the statement, Fleming said he struck Rose a couple of times with an iron bar. When Rose refused to lend him money he “did his block.” The case was adjourned until tomorrow.

ON THIS DAY – November 2, 1937

William James Sharkey, of Medway street, Box Hill, was charged at the City Court yesterday with having attempted to murder Ruth Mary White, of the same address, on November 2. He was remanded by Mr. Hauser, P.M., to Box Hill Court on December 23. Bail as fixed at £350, with a similar surety. In applying for the remand, Sergeant Madin said Sharkey was arrested yesterday.  Senior-Detective Frank Simpson said Sharkey was alleged to have attempted to cut Ruth White’s throat at his home in Medway street on November 2, and then tried to commit suicide. An argument occurred over a young man who had been associated with the woman, said Detective Simpson. The woman was taken to hospital, but had returned home, and was practically normal again. She had been living at Sharkey’s house in Medway Street for some years

ON THIS DAY – July 30, 1947

When acquaintances of Allan William Paul Rose, poultry farmer, of Seamore Road, Box Hill, entered his house on July 30, last, they found him dead with his skull battered as a result of 17 injuries. Today, Alexander Arthur Fleming (28), of Cairo Road, Box Hill, builder’s laborer, was charged with having murdered Rose. The case came before Mr. Justice McFarlan and jury in the Criminal Court. Among exhibits was a piece of iron about 18 inches in length. The Crown alleged that this was the weapon which was used to batter Rose’s skull. Mr. Sproule, K.C., for the Crown, said Rose lived by himself in a little cottage in a rather isolated portion of the street. On Tuesday, July 29, he was seen going to the pictures in Box Hill, as was his custom of a Tuesday night. This was the last time he was seen alive by anyone except his assailant. About 10 o’clock next morning a man called at Rose’s house and saw a hat under the hedge. He received no answer to his call. Later in the day he called again, and found the works of a wristlet watch on the concrete drive. The watch had stopped at 11.20 o’clock. With another man, he entered the house. He found Rose dead on the floor, which was covered with blood. Mr. Sproule said that when Fleming was first questioned by the police, he admitted borrowing £2 from Rose. Later, to Detective Mooney, Fleming said: “Yes, I did it and I admit it.” Mr. Sproule said Fleming made a statement to the police in which he allegedly said he approached Rose on the night of July 29 with a request for a loan, which was refused. The alleged statement described a fight between Rose and Fleming. In the statement, Fleming said he struck Rose a couple of times with an iron bar. When Rose refused to lend him money he “did his block.” The case was adjourned until tomorrow.

Matlock Police was an Australian television police drama series made by Crawford Productions for the 10 Network between 1971 and 1976. The series focused on the police station and crime in the Victorian town of Matlock and the surrounding district, and the backgrounds and personal lives of the main policemen.

The series was the 10 Network’s attempt to come up with a police show to rival Homicide (shown by the Seven Network) and Division 4 (on the Nine Network). Matlock Police was different from its Melbourne-based predecessors by being set in a small country town, the fictional Matlock, Victoria (a real Matlock does exist in Victoria, but it is much smaller than the town depicted by this series, which is loosely based on Shepparton). These program’s introduction featured an overhead shot of a town with a divided road, thought to be of Bairnsdale in Victoria. Series writers had a reference manual giving full details of the town’s geography, amenities, social structure, etc., as well as that of the surrounding area – neighbouring towns included Wilga, Chinaman’s Creek, Possum’s Creek and Burrabri, and there was an offshoot of the Great Dividing Range called the Candowies. The town’s colourful history included the local Aboriginal tribe (the ‘Bangerang’), the town founder (George Matlock), a gold rush, a bushranger (‘Holy’ Joe Cooper – so called both for his theft of a shipment of holey dollars and because he was a preacher) and a town patriarchy (the Falconers). About the only landmark the Matlock district lacked for dramatic purposes was a beach. The first episode was broadcast in Melbourne on 22nd of February 1971. Initially filmed in black and white, the series switched to colour in episode 162, “Loggerheads”. Matlock Police was cancelled in 1975 after 229 episodes had been produced. Matlock Police Station was in fact the Ringwood Police Station in Melbourne. A new frontage has been added to the building.

ON THIS DAY – March 2, 1931

MIDDLE BRIGHTON

Robert De Villiers Dreyer, aged 48, who conducts the Valkenberg Naturopathic Hospital at Middle Brighton, was found guilty in the Criminal Court of the manslaughter on the 2nd of March, of Arthur Haughton Russell, aged 60, of Box Hill. Russell, who suffered from diabetes, had been a patient for some days at the hospital, but he was removed on the 28th of February. He died on the 2nd of March. It was the second trial. A jury at the former trial failed to agree. The defence was that there was nothing prejudicial in the treatment given to Russell, and that Russell died as the result of treatment given after he left the Valkenberg Institution. The jury added a strong recommendation to mercy. Dreyer was remanded for sentence.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – December 28, 1915

Francis Elliott (34) was, at the Criminal Court, convicted on a charge of attempting to murder Arthur Henry Mace, driver, at Box Hill on the 28th of December. It was alleged that the accused, on the evening of December 28, called at Mace’s house and a disturbance took place. He left after threatening to shoot Mace and Mrs. Mace. Mace and his wife went to bed and were aroused about midnight by the report of a gunshot. The walls of the house were marked with gunshot pellets. The accused was remanded for sentence. Elliott received 5 years hard labour.

ON THIS DAY -December 23, 1951

BOX HILL

John Joseph Whelan 25, was charged with the murder at Box Hill on the 23rd December of Stanley Riceborough, 25, a labourer. Riceborough was further remanded to the 10th of January at Melbourne City Court. Riceborough was killed when he was struck in the throat by a jagged glass, hurled by Whelan police allege.

 

ON THIS DAY – November 2, 1937

William James Sharkey, of Medway street, Box Hill, was charged at the City Court yesterday with having attempted to murder Ruth Mary White, of the same address, on November 2. He was remanded by Mr. Hauser, P.M., to Box Hill Court on December 23. Bail as fixed at £350, with a similar surety. In applying for the remand, Sergeant Madin said Sharkey was arrested yesterday.  Senior-Detective Frank Simpson said Sharkey was alleged to have attempted to cut Ruth White’s throat at his home in Medway street on November 2, and then tried to commit suicide. An argument occurred over a young man who had been associated with the woman, said Detective Simpson. The woman was taken to hospital, but had returned home, and was practically normal again. She had been living at Sharkey’s house in Medway Street for some years

ON THIS DAY – July 30, 1947

When acquaintances of Allan William Paul Rose, poultry farmer, of Seamore Road, Box Hill, entered his house on July 30, last, they found him dead with his skull battered as a result of 17 injuries. Today, Alexander Arthur Fleming (28), of Cairo Road, Box Hill, builder’s laborer, was charged with having murdered Rose. The case came before Mr. Justice McFarlan and jury in the Criminal Court. Among exhibits was a piece of iron about 18 inches in length. The Crown alleged that this was the weapon which was used to batter Rose’s skull. Mr. Sproule, K.C., for the Crown, said Rose lived by himself in a little cottage in a rather isolated portion of the street. On Tuesday, July 29, he was seen going to the pictures in Box Hill, as was his custom of a Tuesday night. This was the last time he was seen alive by anyone except his assailant. About 10 o’clock next morning a man called at Rose’s house and saw a hat under the hedge. He received no answer to his call. Later in the day he called again, and found the works of a wristlet watch on the concrete drive. The watch had stopped at 11.20 o’clock. With another man, he entered the house. He found Rose dead on the floor, which was covered with blood. Mr. Sproule said that when Fleming was first questioned by the police, he admitted borrowing £2 from Rose. Later, to Detective Mooney, Fleming said: “Yes, I did it and I admit it.” Mr. Sproule said Fleming made a statement to the police in which he allegedly said he approached Rose on the night of July 29 with a request for a loan, which was refused. The alleged statement described a fight between Rose and Fleming. In the statement, Fleming said he struck Rose a couple of times with an iron bar. When Rose refused to lend him money he “did his block.” The case was adjourned until tomorrow.

60 years of Australian TV

Matlock Police was an Australian television police drama series made by Crawford Productions for the 10 Network between 1971 and 1976. The series focused on the police station and crime in the Victorian town of Matlock and the surrounding district, and the backgrounds and personal lives of the main policemen.
The series was the 10 Network’s attempt to come up with a police show to rival Homicide (shown by the Seven Network) and Division 4 (on the Nine Network). Matlock Police was different from its Melbourne-based predecessors by being set in a small country town, the fictional Matlock, Victoria (a real Matlock does exist in Victoria, but it is much smaller than the town depicted by this series, which is loosely based on Shepparton). These program’s introduction featured an overhead shot of a town with a divided road, thought to be of Bairnsdale in Victoria. Series writers had a reference manual giving full details of the town’s geography, amenities, social structure, etc., as well as that of the surrounding area – neighbouring towns included Wilga, Chinaman’s Creek, Possum’s Creek and Burrabri, and there was an offshoot of the Great Dividing Range called the Candowies. The town’s colourful history included the local Aboriginal tribe (the ‘Bangerang’), the town founder (George Matlock), a gold rush, a bushranger (‘Holy’ Joe Cooper – so called both for his theft of a shipment of holey dollars and because he was a preacher) and a town patriarchy (the Falconers). About the only landmark the Matlock district lacked for dramatic purposes was a beach. The first episode was broadcast in Melbourne on 22nd of February 1971. Initially filmed in black and white, the series switched to colour in episode 162, “Loggerheads”. Matlock Police was cancelled in 1975 after 229 episodes had been produced. Matlock Police Station was in fact the Ringwood Police Station in Melbourne. A new frontage has been added to the building.

ON THIS DAY – March 2, 1931

MIDDLE BRIGHTON

Robert De Villiers Dreyer, aged 48, who conducts the Valkenberg Naturopathic Hospital at Middle Brighton, was found guilty in the Criminal Court of the manslaughter on the 2nd of March, of Arthur Haughton Russell, aged 60, of Box Hill. Russell, who suffered from diabetes, had been a patient for some days at the hospital, but he was removed on the 28th of February. He died on the 2nd of March. It was the second trial. A jury at the former trial failed to agree. The defence was that there was nothing prejudicial in the treatment given to Russell, and that Russell died as the result of treatment given after he left the Valkenberg Institution. The jury added a strong recommendation to mercy. Dreyer was remanded for sentence.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – December 28, 1915

Francis Elliott (34) was, at the Criminal Court, convicted on a charge of attempting to murder Arthur Henry Mace, driver, at Box Hill on the 28th of December. It was alleged that the accused, on the evening of December 28, called at Mace’s house and a disturbance took place. He left after threatening to shoot Mace and Mrs. Mace. Mace and his wife went to bed and were aroused about midnight by the report of a gunshot. The walls of the house were marked with gunshot pellets. The accused was remanded for sentence. Elliott received 5 years hard labour.