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ON THIS DAY – 16th December 1898

The nude body of an unknown young woman, which was found floating in a box in the Yarra River near Chapel-street Bridge on the 16th December 1898, had, it is estimated, been in the water for about a week. Deliberate murder was first suspected, but the post-mortem examination conducted by Dr. Neild indicates that death resulted from the use of chloroform administered, it is supposed, for the purpose of performing an illegal operation.

The box was first seen by some boys, one of whom, having previously had experience of a coroner’s court, had his suspicions aroused by the way it was floating, and reported the matter to the police. The box, when dragged ashore, was found weighted with a heavy stone tied on by a strong wire clothesline. In pulling the box ashore they broke a portion of the side away, revealing the foot and leg of a human being. On arrival at the morgue the body was found to be bunched into the box, the head being forced into one corner, and the whole tied parcel wise with a clothesline. There was no clothing on the body, but a flour bag was loosely wrapped round it. The bag is branded “Alex Clement, Snowdrop patent roller flour, Wangaratta.” The body was finely developed, and is that of a woman under 30. The hair is closely cropped, and the fingers covered with needlemarks. Identification is likely to prove difficult, as the features are distorted in addition to being in a decomposed state. Every indication leads to the belief that the deed was committed under the influence of chloroform, probably as an illegal operation was about to be committed, the woman being enciente. The stomach has been forwarded to Dr. Blackett, the Government Analyst, to make sure that suffocation was not caused by the action of poison.

 

On this day …….. 4th of January 1938

A Mysterious cases which had not been opened for more than 30 years, u covered a skull, a shroud— foul play. These were the macabre finds and the thought that followed of the secretary of the Ararat Mechanics Institute (Mr. G. Hansford), when he was rummaging among old lumber from one of the lower rooms of the institute. An old case believed to have been locked for more than 30 years was opened. Inside was a 4ft. coffin which contained a skull with a false white beard a foot long. The skull was at the end of an imitation of a corpse. As news of the ‘ghost’ spread hundreds visited the institute, but none was able to explain the mystery. It is thought that the coffin, skull and shroud were used in mysteries of some society in the early days.

 

On This Day – December 31, 1912

The mystery concerning the body of a child at Lake Guthridge on December 31 was cleared up today when Sergeant Neill and Constable McCorkell arrested a young woman, aged 23 years, named Violet Daisy Jane Elizabeth Guy at the Turf Hotel this morning on a charge of wilful murder.  Accused admitted her parentage and said that on the morning following the birth of the child, she resumed her duties as a domestic servant.  She stated the child was born dead and that she kept the body in a box for two days and then put it in the lake.  Accused was brought before the Mayor and was remanded until February 24.

 

ON THIS DAY – 16th December 1898

The nude body of an unknown young woman, which was found floating in a box in the Yarra River near Chapel-street Bridge on the 16th December 1898, had, it is estimated, been in the water for about a week. Deliberate murder was first suspected, but the post-mortem examination conducted by Dr. Neild indicates that death resulted from the use of chloroform administered, it is supposed, for the purpose of performing an illegal operation.

The box was first seen by some boys, one of whom, having previously had experience of a coroner’s court, had his suspicions aroused by the way it was floating, and reported the matter to the police. The box, when dragged ashore, was found weighted with a heavy stone tied on by a strong wire clothesline. In pulling the box ashore they broke a portion of the side away, revealing the foot and leg of a human being. On arrival at the morgue the body was found to be bunched into the box, the head being forced into one corner, and the whole tied parcel wise with a clothesline. There was no clothing on the body, but a flour bag was loosely wrapped round it. The bag is branded “Alex Clement, Snowdrop patent roller flour, Wangaratta.” The body was finely developed, and is that of a woman under 30. The hair is closely cropped, and the fingers covered with needlemarks. Identification is likely to prove difficult, as the features are distorted in addition to being in a decomposed state. Every indication leads to the belief that the deed was committed under the influence of chloroform, probably as an illegal operation was about to be committed, the woman being enciente. The stomach has been forwarded to Dr. Blackett, the Government Analyst, to make sure that suffocation was not caused by the action of poison.

 

On this day …….. 4th of January 1938

A Mysterious cases which had not been opened for more than 30 years, u covered a skull, a shroud— foul play. These were the macabre finds and the thought that followed of the secretary of the Ararat Mechanics Institute (Mr. G. Hansford), when he was rummaging among old lumber from one of the lower rooms of the institute. An old case believed to have been locked for more than 30 years was opened. Inside was a 4ft. coffin which contained a skull with a false white beard a foot long. The skull was at the end of an imitation of a corpse. As news of the ‘ghost’ spread hundreds visited the institute, but none was able to explain the mystery. It is thought that the coffin, skull and shroud were used in mysteries of some society in the early days.

 

On This Day – December 31, 1912

The mystery concerning the body of a child at Lake Guthridge on December 31 was cleared up today when Sergeant Neill and Constable McCorkell arrested a young woman, aged 23 years, named Violet Daisy Jane Elizabeth Guy at the Turf Hotel this morning on a charge of wilful murder.  Accused admitted her parentage and said that on the morning following the birth of the child, she resumed her duties as a domestic servant.  She stated the child was born dead and that she kept the body in a box for two days and then put it in the lake.  Accused was brought before the Mayor and was remanded until February 24.

 

ON THIS DAY – 16th December 1898

12380466_223111754686627_652991123_nThe nude body of an unknown young woman, which was found floating in a box in the Yarra River near Chapel-street Bridge on the 16th December 1898, had, it is estimated, been in the water for about a week. Deliberate murder was first suspected, but the post-mortem examination conducted by Dr. Neild indicates that death resulted from the use of chloroform administered, it is supposed, for the purpose of performing an illegal operation.

The box was first seen by some boys, one of whom, having previously had experience of a coroner’s court, had his suspicions aroused by the way it was floating, and reported the matter to the police. The box, when dragged ashore, was found weighted with a heavy stone tied on by a strong wire clothesline. In pulling the box ashore they broke a portion of the side away, revealing the foot and leg of a human being. On arrival at the morgue the body was found to be bunched into the box, the head being forced into one corner, and the whole tied parcel wise with a clothesline. There was no clothing on the body, but a flour bag was loosely wrapped round it. The bag is branded “Alex Clement, Snowdrop patent roller flour, Wangaratta.” The body was finely developed, and is that of a woman under 30. The hair is closely cropped, and the fingers covered with needlemarks. Identification is likely to prove difficult, as the features are distorted in addition to being in a decomposed state. Every indication leads to the belief that the deed was committed under the influence of chloroform, probably as an illegal operation was about to be committed, the woman being enciente. The stomach has been forwarded to Dr. Blackett, the Government Analyst, to make sure that suffocation was not caused by the action of poison.