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Up to 4 cm. in length, Australia’s Bulldog Ants are the biggest ants in the world and can be found in any part of Australia. They killed a farmer in Victoria in 1988 but this is one of only three deaths by this species. Authorities are more worried about the South American fire ant that has made it into Australia and has been found around Brisbane. Being very aggressive and having a powerful sting they have killed new born calves and birds and are considered quite able to kill people, authorities have gone to considerable trouble to try and eradicate this ant.

 

On this day …….. 18th of July 1936

William Cunningham of Paddington, Brisbane was found with his tongue frozen against a pipe at the Mountain Milk Company’s freezing works at Dayboro, Queensland, on the 18th of July 1936. The 20 year old was released from the pipe after water was poured on his tongue.

 

On This Day – June 16, 1936

AMAZING CONFLICT – Perjury Charge Fails

Strangely contradictory evidence of a marriage which was alleged to have been celebrated in a synagogue in Brisbane on June 16 last year was heard in the General Sessions to-day, when Arthur T. Gibson, a carpenter, pleaded “Not guilty” to a charge of perjury.

The Crown alleged that at the hearing of a case at St. Kilda on April 8. Gibson, on oath, swore that he had been married to Miss Esther Roth, of Murwillumbah, New South Wales, at the Margaret-street Synagogue, Brisbane. In evidence to-day, Gibson swore that he had not committed perjury, and that he had, in fact, been married to Miss Roth at the Brisbane Synagogue. Miss Roth, in evidence, said that she had first met Gibson at Murwillumbah in 1935. She had seen him again in March, 1936, but they had certainly never bean married.

Cross-examined, she said that she had never been photographed with Gibson, but when she was shown a snapshot in which she appeared with Gibson she said that she had forgotten about it. A studio portrait, with Miss Roth and Gibson portrayed with their heads touching, was then produced, Miss Roth however, repeated that they had never been photographed together and said that she could not explain how this portrait had been obtained by Gibson.

Leon Roth, a storekeeper, of Murwillumbah, father of the girl, and Isaac Meerkrin, President of the Brisbane Hebrew congregation and honorary- minister of the Hebrew Church, denied that Miss Roth had married Gibson. Meerkrin said he would never marry a gentile in a Jewish church, He had refused to marry Gibson because Miss Roth was not 21, and he was of a different faith.

Gibson, giving evidence on oath, said that in January 1936, he asked Mr Roth if he and the girl could be married. but the father refused, On June 16 they were married in Brisbane, but the marriage had been kept a secret. While his wife returned to live with her parents, he lived at his boarding-house. They went to Brisbane almost every week-end as man and wife. While in hospital in Clayfield in November, Gibson said, his wife had told him that a son had been born and that it had his eyebrows and eyes. After a brief retirement, the jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and Gibson was discharged,

Between 1852 and 2011, at least 951 people were killed by floods, another 1326 were injured, and the cost of damage reached an estimated $4.76 billion dollars.

1. June 1852 – Gundagai, NSW

89 deaths, entire settlement of 250 people destroyed

There’s little doubt that the 2010/2011 Queensland floods were Australia’s most devastating in terms of damage to infrastructure and cost, but the worst loss of life happened in June 1852 when massive flooding on the Murrumbidgee River swept away most of the town of Gundagai, leaving just three houses standing. Eighty-nine people were killed, more than third of the population. The town was later rebuilt on higher ground.
2. Dec 2010 – Jan 2011 – Brisbane and SE QLD

35 confirmed deaths, $2.38 billion in damage

With more than 200,000 people affected state-wide, the economic damage from this flood was estimated at $2.38 billion. Beginning with rains in September and then culminating with Category 1 Cyclone Tasha crossing the Far North Queensland coast on 24 December 2011, this was probably the most notorious flood in Australian history. In Brisbane, the river peaked at 4.46m on 13 January, flooding more than 28,000 homes and leaving 100,000 without power. Cyclone Yasi, which hit 3 Feburary, caused further damage to already sodden towns.
3. Dec 27, 1916 – Clermont and Peak Downs, QLD

65 deaths, 10 homes destroyed, 50 buildings damaged and 10,000 livestock killed

A cyclone swept the coast along the Whitsunday Passage, bringing heavy rainfall to Clermont, Sapphire and Peak Downs. This usually flood-savvy town forgot to counter for the runoff from nearby catchments and creeks and the debris it carried with it at crushing speeds. The torrent smashed through houses and caused widespread damage. The lower part of Clermont was submerged, so the town was rebuilt on higher ground.
4. Nov 29, 1934 – Melbourne, VIC

36 deaths, 6000 homeless and 400+ buildings damaged

In late November 140mm of rain fell in Melbourne over a 48-hour period. To the east of Melbourne, in South Gippsland, 350mm fell over the same two-day period. The downpour resulted in landslides, evacuations and many submerged roads. Eighteen people drowned, with a further 18 killed by collapsing buildings and other dangers. More than 400 buildings were damaged in Melbourne and 6000 people were left homeless.
5. Feb 15, 1893 – Ipswich, QLD

35 deaths, 300 people injured and two bridges destroyed

Often referred to as the Black February Flood, the extreme weather conditions and heavy rain were brought about by tropical Cyclone Bundinyong. The Crohamhurst weather station recorded 914mm of rain in a 24-hour period and another gauge recorded almost 889mm of rainfall in Brisbane’s water catchments. Both the Victoria Bridge and the Indooroopilly railway bridge collapsed, with 35 people killed and 300 injured.
6. Feb 1927 – Brisbane, Cairns, Townsville, QLD

47 deaths, 16 homes destroyed, an estimated £300,000 in damages

A tropical cyclone hit north of Cairns, causing major rainfall through Queensland, reaching as far as Toowoomba. The torrential rain, which fell from 9-17 February, led to the deaths of 47 people, damaged roads, railways, bridges and buildings – and completely destroyed 16 houses. There was also widespread loss of livestock. The estimated costs reported at the time were in the region of £300,000.
7. Apr 1929 – Northern Tasmania

22 deaths, 1000 homes damaged, 25 bridges destroyed

The area of Northern Tasmania is prone to heavy rainfall over short periods and up to 500mm of rain fell over three days. The floodwater carved a path across the region, destroying everything in its path, including vehicles, buildings and railroad tracks. It inflicted huge stock losses, the evacuation of 3500 people, while damaging 35 bridges and 1000 homes.

8. Feb 1955 – Hunter Valley, NSW

24 deaths, 59 homes destroyed, 5200 homes flooded and 40,000+ people evacuated

The majority of deaths were around Singleton and Maitland, but most other river systems in the state were also in flood. These floods in the Hunter Valley have become symbolic in the Australian psyche of the dramatic nature of flood damage and rescue. About 15,000 people were evacuated from around these two towns, with more than 40,000 people being evacuated from a total of 40 towns. Five of the lives lost were due to electrocution during rescue operations.
9. Jan – Apr 1974 – Brisbane, QLD

14 deaths, 300 injured, 56 homes destroyed, an estimated $68 million in damages

After a particularly wet year in 1973, Brisbane was inundated with water when tropical cyclone Wanda hit the north of the city on 25 January 1974. By 29 January the Brisbane area had recorded 900mm of rain, with 314mm of rain falling in a 24-hour period. In the coming months the torrential rain swept down the east coast, causing floods in parts of NSW and Tasmania. The floods killed 14 people and injured 300 more, as well as destroying 56 homes and damaging 6000 others. In all, an estimated $68 million worth of damages occurred.
10. Aug 1986 – Hawkesbury and Georges River Flood, NSW

6 dead, 10,000 homes damaged, an estimated $35M in damages.

With the rainfall reaching 327.6mm in 24 hours, this day has been dubbed Sydney’s wettest day ever. The torrential rain created chaos, with flooded roads prompting many motorists to abandon their cars. Bus services were severely disrupted in the city and trains were halted due to flooded tunnels.

 

On This Day ……. 30th May 1954

Sir Arthur Faddan (13th Prime Minister of Australia) was injured in a car accident at Grantham, about 80 miles from Brisbane on the eve of the Federal election on this day in 1954. He under when a minor operation for the removal of congealed blood. Because of the election on the Saturday after the accident, Prime Minister Menzies had not been able to visit Sir Arthur sooner. The Prime Minister was “deeply shocked” when he first heard of the accident and made arrangements to have half-hour telephone reports on Sir Arthur’s condition.

On this day …….. 9th September 1947

Phone calls to the police and newspaper office resulted in a visit to Toowong Cemetery, Brisbane, of local residents in pyjamas. Police constable and reporter calls were to the effect that a “ghost light” had been seen, among the graves. Three searchers found the light came from a candle on the grave of an Albanian. Cooked rice and flowers were also on the grave.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 26th August 1956

A 15-YEAR-OLD, dark-eyed Italian girl told the Criminal Court that a man who was shot, dead at her home on this day in 1956, had forced his attentions on her. She said the man Vincenzo Impiombato 32, of Lygon st., Carlton forced her to accompany him to Brisbane. The girl Grace Riotto, of Severn st., Moonee Ponds, said she was terrified of Impiombato, who, she alleged, had threatened to kill her and carried a rifle with him in his car and when he went to bed. Her brother, Marco Riotto, 16, has pleaded not guilty to having murdered Impiombato. The girl told the Court Impiombato was a boarder at her home last April.  After he left there, he began meeting her. One night he took her to his place in Lygon st., Carlton, and next day they drove off to Brisbane, sleeping in the car on the way. After a week in Brisbane as man and wife, they re turned to Melbourne. “Threat” She said she returned to live with her parents on August 23. Three days later Impiombato called for her and said he would shoot some bf her family unless she told her parents she wanted to go to Western Australia with him. She said she warned her father, because Impiombato had a rifle. She was in a bedroom when she heard two shots. Before the second shot, she heard her mother tell Marco that Impiombato had come “to kill all the family.” To Mr. F. Galbally (for the defence), the girl said she went away with Impiombato because she was afraid of him. He said he would kill her if she did not do what he told’ her. She had begged him to let her go home. “Might kill” Guiseppe Riotto, father of the accused man, said his daughter told him: “Father, there is Vincenzo with a rifle in his hand. You be careful because he might kill you.” He said he went to the door and Impiomoato called cut to him, “If you move I’ll blow your head off.” He said Impiombato was coming toward him with a rifle when he heard a gun go off, and Impiombato, who was coming up the steps, said: “And now I,am going to kill you and all your family.” His son Marco pushed him aside and he heard another gunshot and Impiombato fell to the ground.  Riotto told Mr. Galbally he reported his daughter missing to the police when he went away from home. Later, he laid charges against Impiombato, alleging abduction and rape.

On this day …….. 19th of August 1924

William Ambrose was working on the night shift at Finney’s Hill Silver Mine at Indooroopilly, Brisbane, on 19th of August 1924, 60 metres below ground. His job was to push load trucks to the mines main shaft where a cage was waiting to convey the load to the surface. On one occasion he delivered the truck, but the cage was not there and the heavily laden truck hurtled over the edge and down the main shaft. The force Ambrose’s final heave, which was intended to push the truck right onto the cage, carried him over the edge and he followed the truck 40 metres down the shaft. When rescuers went down, they found Ambrose floating unhurt in water at the bottom. Ambrose wanted to return to work straight away but management sent him home for the rest of the night.

 

On this day …….. 17th of August 1937

Members of Perry Bros.’ Circus have operated’ on one of the elephants nine year-old Topsy, who was imported from India at the age of about four years for a poisoned foot, since the circus arrived in Brisbane. Although she is still hobbling about with half a sack of bran mash poultice on the injured foot, she is well on the way to recovery. Until it is completely healed Topsy is having a rest. No anaesthetic could be administered, so the trainer (Mr. Harry Rountree) just held Topsy down, and, assisted by a Brisbane veterinary surgeon, lanced the wound. Topsy struggled and bellowed a little, but like Androcles the lion, she seemed to know it was for her own good.

 

Up to 4 cm. in length, Australia’s Bulldog Ants are the biggest ants in the world and can be found in any part of Australia. They killed a farmer in Victoria in 1988 but this is one of only three deaths by this species. Authorities are more worried about the South American fire ant that has made it into Australia and has been found around Brisbane. Being very aggressive and having a powerful sting they have killed new born calves and birds and are considered quite able to kill people, authorities have gone to considerable trouble to try and eradicate this ant.

 

On this day …….. 18th of July 1936

William Cunningham of Paddington, Brisbane was found with his tongue frozen against a pipe at the Mountain Milk Company’s freezing works at Dayboro, Queensland, on the 18th of July 1936. The 20 year old was released from the pipe after water was poured on his tongue.

 

On This Day – June 16, 1936

AMAZING CONFLICT – Perjury Charge Fails

Strangely contradictory evidence of a marriage which was alleged to have been celebrated in a synagogue in Brisbane on June 16 last year was heard in the General Sessions to-day, when Arthur T. Gibson, a carpenter, pleaded “Not guilty” to a charge of perjury.

The Crown alleged that at the hearing of a case at St. Kilda on April 8. Gibson, on oath, swore that he had been married to Miss Esther Roth, of Murwillumbah, New South Wales, at the Margaret-street Synagogue, Brisbane. In evidence to-day, Gibson swore that he had not committed perjury, and that he had, in fact, been married to Miss Roth at the Brisbane Synagogue. Miss Roth, in evidence, said that she had first met Gibson at Murwillumbah in 1935. She had seen him again in March, 1936, but they had certainly never bean married.

Cross-examined, she said that she had never been photographed with Gibson, but when she was shown a snapshot in which she appeared with Gibson she said that she had forgotten about it. A studio portrait, with Miss Roth and Gibson portrayed with their heads touching, was then produced, Miss Roth however, repeated that they had never been photographed together and said that she could not explain how this portrait had been obtained by Gibson.

Leon Roth, a storekeeper, of Murwillumbah, father of the girl, and Isaac Meerkrin, President of the Brisbane Hebrew congregation and honorary- minister of the Hebrew Church, denied that Miss Roth had married Gibson. Meerkrin said he would never marry a gentile in a Jewish church, He had refused to marry Gibson because Miss Roth was not 21, and he was of a different faith.

Gibson, giving evidence on oath, said that in January 1936, he asked Mr Roth if he and the girl could be married. but the father refused, On June 16 they were married in Brisbane, but the marriage had been kept a secret. While his wife returned to live with her parents, he lived at his boarding-house. They went to Brisbane almost every week-end as man and wife. While in hospital in Clayfield in November, Gibson said, his wife had told him that a son had been born and that it had his eyebrows and eyes. After a brief retirement, the jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and Gibson was discharged,