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ON THIS DAY…… 26th November 1855

The colony of Van Diemen’s Land becomes known as Tasmania

Fears that the French would colonise Van Diemen’s Land caused the British to establish a small settlement on the Derwent River in 1803. 33 of the 49 people in the group were convicts, and the settlement continued to receive convicts re-shipped from New South Wales or Norfolk Island up until 1812. Regular shipments of convicts directly from Britain began in 1818. A second penal colony was established at Macquarie Harbour on the west coast of Van Diemen’s Land in 1822, and three years later, the British Government separated Van Dieman’s Land from New South Wales. Macquarie Harbour was eventually closed down, to be replaced by Port Arthur. Transportation of convicts to Van Diemen’s Land ended in 1853. On 26 November 1855, the colony officially became known as Tasmania and elections for parliament were held the following year.

On this day …….. 24th April 1804

The first cemetery in Tasmania

Hobart in Tasmania is the second oldest city in Australia, with Sydney being the oldest. The city began as a penal colony at Risdon Cove on the Derwent River in Van Diemen’s Land in 1803 to offset British concerns over the presence of French explorers. On the 24th of April 1804, the first cemetery was established on Van Diemen’s Land. Named St David’s Cemetery, it has since been transformed into St David’s Park.

 

On This Day……… 1st April 1873

Creswick

A great All Fools Day Joke was played by some wags at Creswick, on this day in 1873. It appears that in the shire a licence fee of £25 was imposed, which some 15 or 20 publicans refused to pay, and fines for selling without a licence applied. Taking advantage of their dissatisfaction, some unknown wag, well acquainted with the facts conceived an idea, and was so successfully carried out. Writing to nearly every publican in the shire, asking his attendance at a meeting to be held at the British Hotel, Creswick to give evidence before a commission. Never was a bait more eagerly snapped at, from 9am the town was quite alive with buggies and horse men rapidly pouring in, much to the astonishment of the townspeople, who were quite at a loss to account for this sudden eruption. The British did not know, nor did any one else. No one there had heard anything of such a meeting previously, and all seemed wrapt in mystery. When looking at the letters sent again it was noticed in the corner was a mysterious ‘A. F.’ in red ink. – All fools day 1873 was spoken about for years to come.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 26th November 1855

The colony of Van Diemen’s Land becomes known as Tasmania

Fears that the French would colonise Van Diemen’s Land caused the British to establish a small settlement on the Derwent River in 1803. 33 of the 49 people in the group were convicts, and the settlement continued to receive convicts re-shipped from New South Wales or Norfolk Island up until 1812. Regular shipments of convicts directly from Britain began in 1818. A second penal colony was established at Macquarie Harbour on the west coast of Van Diemen’s Land in 1822, and three years later, the British Government separated Van Dieman’s Land from New South Wales. Macquarie Harbour was eventually closed down, to be replaced by Port Arthur. Transportation of convicts to Van Diemen’s Land ended in 1853. On 26 November 1855, the colony officially became known as Tasmania and elections for parliament were held the following year.

On this day …….. 24th April 1804

The first cemetery in Tasmania

Hobart in Tasmania is the second oldest city in Australia, with Sydney being the oldest. The city began as a penal colony at Risdon Cove on the Derwent River in Van Diemen’s Land in 1803 to offset British concerns over the presence of French explorers. On the 24th of April 1804, the first cemetery was established on Van Diemen’s Land. Named St David’s Cemetery, it has since been transformed into St David’s Park.

 

On This Day……… 1st April 1873

Creswick

A great All Fools Day Joke was played by some wags at Creswick, on this day in 1873. It appears that in the shire a licence fee of £25 was imposed, which some 15 or 20 publicans refused to pay, and fines for selling without a licence applied. Taking advantage of their dissatisfaction, some unknown wag, well acquainted with the facts conceived an idea, and was so successfully carried out. Writing to nearly every publican in the shire, asking his attendance at a meeting to be held at the British Hotel, Creswick to give evidence before a commission. Never was a bait more eagerly snapped at, from 9am the town was quite alive with buggies and horse men rapidly pouring in, much to the astonishment of the townspeople, who were quite at a loss to account for this sudden eruption. The British did not know, nor did any one else. No one there had heard anything of such a meeting previously, and all seemed wrapt in mystery. When looking at the letters sent again it was noticed in the corner was a mysterious ‘A. F.’ in red ink. – All fools day 1873 was spoken about for years to come.