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ON THIS DAY….. 10th July 1914

In the Brunswick court when Frank White (22) appeared on a charge of having inflicted grievous bodily harm upon Richard Wood on July 10, the charge was altered to one of the murder. Sergeant McLoughlin said Wood died in the Melbourne Hospital as the result of a depressed fracture of the skull, alleged to have been caused by a blow with a bottle from White. White was further remanded, and bail was refused. Subsequently Mr Justice Hodges, in the Supreme Court, granted bail in two sureties of £500 each, and White’s own bond of £1000.

 

ON THIS DAY….. 10th July 1914

In the Brunswick court when Frank White (22) appeared on a charge of having inflicted grievous bodily harm upon Richard Wood on July 10, the charge was altered to one of the murder. Sergeant McLoughlin said Wood died in the Melbourne Hospital as the result of a depressed fracture of the skull, alleged to have been caused by a blow with a bottle from White. White was further remanded, and bail was refused. Subsequently Mr Justice Hodges, in the Supreme Court, granted bail in two sureties of £500 each, and White’s own bond of £1000.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 25, 1917

EAST BRUNSWICK

At the Brunswick Court on the 1st of March 1917, Stella Hines was presented on a charge of having murdered Eric McIntosh, at Glenlyon road, East Brunswick, on this day in February. The charge arose out of an alleged mock duel between the man and woman. Sergeant Evans explained that the Coroner had returned a verdict of manslaughter against Hines, and the murder change was withdrawn.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 6, 1920

MELBOURNE

MATE CHARGED WITH MURDER.

At the Brunswick court Joseph Smith, 40, labourer, was charged on remand with having murdered Hedley Dunlop, on the 6th of February. It is alleged that Smith, who is a connection by marriage of Dunlop’s wife, spent the whole of the afternoon in an hotel drinking with Dunlop. They went to Dunlop’s house in Victoria grove, at 5.30p.m. taking bottles of beer with them. Dunlop was asked by his wife if he had collected his wages, and he replied that he had not, as he was too drunk. It was then stated that an altercation took place between Dunlop and his wife, and that Smith struck Dunlop, who was found dead in bed next morning.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 5th February 1936

A remarkable, story of an alleged attempt to poison a Brunswick married couple by sending them a poisoned pudding through the post was related at the Brunswick Court on the 5th February 1896, when Dorothy Davies, married, a needlewoman, of West Brunswick, was charged with the attempted murder of Harry Sumbler, confectioner, of Brunswick, and his wife, Margaret Sumbler. In evidence it was stated that Sumbler and his wife received a pudding by post on the 12th of December. After Mrs Sumbler took a bite she thought it tasted bad and spat it out. A small quantity was given to a kelpie dog, which died within an hour and a half. Expert evidence was given that ground poisoned wheat had been sprinkled over the pudding and that analysis showed that the pudding contained sufficient poison to produce death in an adult. The police produced a statement alleged to have been made by Davies, admitting the crime, in which she said that she had known Sumbler for many years. She used to help him look after his shop and did other work for him. Because there was too much work in the shop he obtained the services of Margaret O’Connor, whom he married last year. Because of the way he treated her and took a fancy to Margaret O’Connor she became aggrieved with both him and her and in December decided to send to Mr and Mrs Sumbler a pudding with something on it to make them sick. She got some poisoned wheat she had for poisoning mice. She ground the wheat into powder, sprinkled it on top of the pudding, and replaced it in the cover. She intended only to make the Sumblers suffer as they had made her suffer. She did not know it would kill anybody. Sumbler told the Court that after his marriage Mrs Davies was aggressive towards him and he told her that it would be best for her to stay away. Once he had an argument with her and she went towards a gun. On numerous occasions she had threatened him, and once she said she would put a bomb on his roof. He denied having proposed to Mrs Davies.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 5th February 1896

BRUNSWICK

James Adams, an elderly man, was committed for trial at the Brunswick Court on a charge of shooting with intent to murder his wife. The parties were living apart, and the accused called at his wife’s residence and asked her to forgive him. She replied that she could not after the trouble he had given her. He then drew a revolver and fired, the bullet striking the underpart of her left arm. She then called out that she would for gave him. He, however, tried to fire again, but the weapon would not go off.

 

 

ON THIS DAY….. 10th July 1914

In the Brunswick court when Frank White (22) appeared on a charge of having inflicted grievous bodily harm upon Richard Wood on July 10, the charge was altered to one of the murder. Sergeant McLoughlin said Wood died in the Melbourne Hospital as the result of a depressed fracture of the skull, alleged to have been caused by a blow with a bottle from White. White was further remanded, and bail was refused. Subsequently Mr Justice Hodges, in the Supreme Court, granted bail in two sureties of £500 each, and White’s own bond of £1000.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 25, 1917

EAST BRUNSWICK

At the Brunswick Court on the 1st of March 1917, Stella Hines was presented on a charge of having murdered Eric McIntosh, at Glenlyon road, East Brunswick, on this day in February. The charge arose out of an alleged mock duel between the man and woman. Sergeant Evans explained that the Coroner had returned a verdict of manslaughter against Hines, and the murder change was withdrawn.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 6, 1920

MELBOURNE

MATE CHARGED WITH MURDER.

At the Brunswick court Joseph Smith, 40, labourer, was charged on remand with having murdered Hedley Dunlop, on the 6th of February. It is alleged that Smith, who is a connection by marriage of Dunlop’s wife, spent the whole of the afternoon in an hotel drinking with Dunlop. They went to Dunlop’s house in Victoria grove, at 5.30p.m. taking bottles of beer with them. Dunlop was asked by his wife if he had collected his wages, and he replied that he had not, as he was too drunk. It was then stated that an altercation took place between Dunlop and his wife, and that Smith struck Dunlop, who was found dead in bed next morning.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 5th February 1936

A remarkable, story of an alleged attempt to poison a Brunswick married couple by sending them a poisoned pudding through the post was related at the Brunswick Court on the 5th February 1896, when Dorothy Davies, married, a needlewoman, of West Brunswick, was charged with the attempted murder of Harry Sumbler, confectioner, of Brunswick, and his wife, Margaret Sumbler. In evidence it was stated that Sumbler and his wife received a pudding by post on the 12th of December. After Mrs Sumbler took a bite she thought it tasted bad and spat it out. A small quantity was given to a kelpie dog, which died within an hour and a half. Expert evidence was given that ground poisoned wheat had been sprinkled over the pudding and that analysis showed that the pudding contained sufficient poison to produce death in an adult. The police produced a statement alleged to have been made by Davies, admitting the crime, in which she said that she had known Sumbler for many years. She used to help him look after his shop and did other work for him. Because there was too much work in the shop he obtained the services of Margaret O’Connor, whom he married last year. Because of the way he treated her and took a fancy to Margaret O’Connor she became aggrieved with both him and her and in December decided to send to Mr and Mrs Sumbler a pudding with something on it to make them sick. She got some poisoned wheat she had for poisoning mice. She ground the wheat into powder, sprinkled it on top of the pudding, and replaced it in the cover. She intended only to make the Sumblers suffer as they had made her suffer. She did not know it would kill anybody. Sumbler told the Court that after his marriage Mrs Davies was aggressive towards him and he told her that it would be best for her to stay away. Once he had an argument with her and she went towards a gun. On numerous occasions she had threatened him, and once she said she would put a bomb on his roof. He denied having proposed to Mrs Davies.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 5th February 1896

BRUNSWICK

James Adams, an elderly man, was committed for trial at the Brunswick Court on a charge of shooting with intent to murder his wife. The parties were living apart, and the accused called at his wife’s residence and asked her to forgive him. She replied that she could not after the trouble he had given her. He then drew a revolver and fired, the bullet striking the underpart of her left arm. She then called out that she would for gave him. He, however, tried to fire again, but the weapon would not go off.