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 On This Day – August 7, 1913

When going through the many statements taken for the information of the coroner in connection with the murder, on August 7 last, of the old woodcutter, Richard Knight, outside his hut in the bush between Lilydale and Coldstream (says the Melbourne ‘Argus’). Detective-Sergeant Arthur and Detective Keily discovered certain discrepancies in the stories of several boys living in Coldstream. Information concerning their movements around the time of the murder was proffered in such a manner that many possibilities were presented, and in order to satisfy themselves that the boys were not purposely withholding certain facts, the two detectives yesterday returned from Melbourne to Coldstream. Each of the boys was seen, and though they all presisted in their previous statements, they were not able to explain whether certain of their actions were, due to a coincidence or otherwise. They could not be shaken in their first statement that they had not seen the old man after he was shot at, though one of them admitted having been at his hut just previous to the time when two residents of the neighbouring bush heard two shots fired in the direction of the hut. The boys were questioned separately, but they showed no signs of wavering, neither did their statements contradict each other. In view of this, the detectives came to the conclusion that it was useless prolonging the examination.  Unless something unforseen happens nothing more will now be done until the inquest, the date of which the coronor (Dr. Cole) will probably fix within the next few days.  Altogether, about 20 witnesses will be subpoenaed, as the police intend having everyone present who may possibly be able to assist the coroner in determining when, how, and by whom Knight was killed.

 On This Day – August 7, 1913

When going through the many statements taken for the information of the coroner in connection with the murder, on August 7 last, of the old woodcutter, Richard Knight, outside his hut in the bush between Lilydale and Coldstream (says the Melbourne ‘Argus’). Detective-Sergeant Arthur and Detective Keily discovered certain discrepancies in the stories of several boys living in Coldstream. Information concerning their movements around the time of the murder was proffered in such a manner that many possibilities were presented, and in order to satisfy themselves that the boys were not purposely withholding certain facts, the two detectives yesterday returned from Melbourne to Coldstream. Each of the boys was seen, and though they all presisted in their previous statements, they were not able to explain whether certain of their actions were, due to a coincidence or otherwise. They could not be shaken in their first statement that they had not seen the old man after he was shot at, though one of them admitted having been at his hut just previous to the time when two residents of the neighbouring bush heard two shots fired in the direction of the hut. The boys were questioned separately, but they showed no signs of wavering, neither did their statements contradict each other. In view of this, the detectives came to the conclusion that it was useless prolonging the examination.  Unless something unforseen happens nothing more will now be done until the inquest, the date of which the coronor (Dr. Cole) will probably fix within the next few days.  Altogether, about 20 witnesses will be subpoenaed, as the police intend having everyone present who may possibly be able to assist the coroner in determining when, how, and by whom Knight was killed.

On this day …….. 18th of April 1876

On this day in 1876 a lunatic named Richard Pace managed to effect his escape from the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum. For nearly a month he had been wandering about the bush. At one time he was seen on the Boorhaman run near to where the man Greenwood (former lunatic) hanged himself. From there he seemed to have strayed away to a bend in the Ovens river, and near the Murray, situated some 25 miles from Wangaratta. It was here he was found by Mounted Constable M’Crackon, after a search of two days. He was camped on the bank of the river. He had no covering of any kind. His clothes were in a most dilapidated condition and he was altogether in a very miserable state. He appears to have existed upon shell-fish. Had he not been found at the time he was the probability is that he would have perished from exposure and want of proper nourishment. He was taken back to the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum in charge of Constable M’Cracken.

 

 On This Day – August 7, 1913

When going through the many statements taken for the information of the coroner in connection with the murder, on August 7 last, of the old woodcutter, Richard Knight, outside his hut in the bush between Lilydale and Coldstream (says the Melbourne ‘Argus’). Detective-Sergeant Arthur and Detective Keily discovered certain discrepancies in the stories of several boys living in Coldstream. Information concerning their movements around the time of the murder was proffered in such a manner that many possibilities were presented, and in order to satisfy themselves that the boys were not purposely withholding certain facts, the two detectives yesterday returned from Melbourne to Coldstream. Each of the boys was seen, and though they all presisted in their previous statements, they were not able to explain whether certain of their actions were, due to a coincidence or otherwise. They could not be shaken in their first statement that they had not seen the old man after he was shot at, though one of them admitted having been at his hut just previous to the time when two residents of the neighbouring bush heard two shots fired in the direction of the hut. The boys were questioned separately, but they showed no signs of wavering, neither did their statements contradict each other. In view of this, the detectives came to the conclusion that it was useless prolonging the examination.  Unless something unforseen happens nothing more will now be done until the inquest, the date of which the coronor (Dr. Cole) will probably fix within the next few days.  Altogether, about 20 witnesses will be subpoenaed, as the police intend having everyone present who may possibly be able to assist the coroner in determining when, how, and by whom Knight was killed.

On this day …….. 18th of April 1876

On this day in 1876 a lunatic named Richard Pace managed to effect his escape from the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum. For nearly a month he had been wandering about the bush. At one time he was seen on the Boorhaman run near to where the man Greenwood (former lunatic) hanged himself. From there he seemed to have strayed away to a bend in the Ovens river, and near the Murray, situated some 25 miles from Wangaratta. It was here he was found by Mounted Constable M’Crackon, after a search of two days. He was camped on the bank of the river. He had no covering of any kind. His clothes were in a most dilapidated condition and he was altogether in a very miserable state. He appears to have existed upon shell-fish. Had he not been found at the time he was the probability is that he would have perished from exposure and want of proper nourishment. He was taken back to the Beechworth Lunatic Asylum in charge of Constable M’Cracken.

 

On the 6th of October, 1857, two men (splitters) named, – Meeson and George Hughan, had been working as mates for some time, and that a few days ago they had had some words. They left Ballan for the purpose of bringing in some timber to complete a contract and seem to have had another quarrel on, when prisoner, Meeson, took up an axe and struck deceased (Hughan) on the head with it, causing almost instantaneous death. Being unable to remove the body he lit a large fire and commenced the operation of cutting it up with a knife which he had in his possession, for the purpose of burning it, and he had succeeded in disposing of all but the legs, when he was suddenly come upon by some men who were travelling through the bush, who rushed upon him with the intention of effecting his capture. The monster, however, was instantly upon his guard, and threatened to stab the first man who attempted to lay hands on him. He was, however, eventually overpowered and trooper Doyle, and another, coming up at the time, he was by them taken into custody, and conveyed into Ballan, on horseback. He was brought up yesterday at the Ballan Police Court, and now lies in Ballarat gaol, fully committed to take his trial for wilful murder.