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ON THIS DAY – June 18, 1923

When Constable Davies, of Hawthorn, was assisting Samuel Lazarus, aged 76 years, of Alma road, Camberwell, across the road at the corner of Leura grove and Burke road, Camberwell, Lazarus was struck by a passing motor-lorry. He was taken to the Alfred Hospital, where he died shortly after admittance. Lazarus, who was a cripple, had alighted from a tram on which Constable Davies had been travelling. The driver of the motor-lorry, David Robert Burns, aged 30 yean, carrier, of Burke road, South Camberwell, was charged with manslaughter.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 18, 1923

When Constable Davies, of Hawthorn, was assisting Samuel Lazarus, aged 76 years, of Alma road, Camberwell, across the road at the corner of Leura grove and Burke road, Camberwell, Lazarus was struck by a passing motor-lorry. He was taken to the Alfred Hospital, where he died shortly after admittance. Lazarus, who was a cripple, had alighted from a tram on which Constable Davies had been travelling. The driver of the motor-lorry, David Robert Burns, aged 30 yean, carrier, of Burke road, South Camberwell, was charged with manslaughter.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 13th April 1940

EAST HAWTHORN

Douglas Ernest Evans aged 27, of Hawthorn, was committed for trial on a charge of having murdered James Charles Edwards aged 47, on this day in 1940. Senior-Detective Deslamen said that Evans had told the police that he was at the garage in Burke road, Camberwell, where Edwards was murdered on April 13, from 11.40am to 12.00pm, and that an Air Force man who was there also was angry Edwards about some repair work to a car he had done. Evans was charged with the murder.

 

On this day ……… 31st of March 1917

Accident was caused on platform No.3, at Flinders-street station on this day in 1917. When the 12.52 pm, train arrived several people were struck and knocked down by an open door of a compartment of the incoming train from Camberwell. The names of the people struck by the door were either bruised or cut are:—Stephen Butler, G. Smith, G. Myers, W. Berudt and G. Haywury.

 

 

On this day …….. 25th of December 1916

An aggressive tiger snake which attacked Private Frederick Thoroughgood, a soldier who had been invalided home deaf and dumb from Gallipoli, was the means of his regaining both his speech and hearing. Private Thoroughgood, who since his return has been an inmate of the Camberwell Convalescent Home, Mont Albert-road, attended a picnic at Warrandyte on Christmas day. While walking through the bush he almost trod on the snake, which immediately showed fight, and Thoroughgood, after a short encounter, despatched the reptile with a stick. The affray excited Thoroughgood somewhat, and a little later his companions were surprised to hear him commence whistling. Shortly afterwards he asked in a normal voice, “Well, what’s the next item on the programme ?” Speech and hearing came to him, simultaneously, being doubtless the best Christmas box that he could have desired.

 

ON THIS DAY – December 25, 1888

At the Melbourne Supreme Court, John Anglin was charged with the murder of his wife, Jemima Caroline, by shooting her at the residence of her brother in law, Mr Herbert John Rhodes, Inglesby road, Camberwell, on the 25th December. Anglin had been married to his wife for nine years before the murder. The accused was always exceedingly jealous of his wife, and strange and eccentric in his behaviour towards her, labouring under some delusion concerning her faithfulness. In consequence of that delusion, he used to strike her, and treated her abominably. She had ultimately to leave him, owing to his violence and jealously, mid supported herself by teaching music. At the time of the murder she was stopping with her sister, Mrs. Rhodes, at Camberwell. The prisoner called at the place on Christmas Day, and said he wanted to see his children Mr Rhodes ordered him away, and, as he did not leave, went to the yard and took an axe, with the view of frightening the prisoner away. On Mr Rhodes reappearing at the door with the axe in his hand, the accused shot at him, and on Mrs. Anglin coming out of the dining room into the passage to ascertain the cause of the discharge of firearms the prisoner shot her also, and followed her into the house, where he shot her again one of the bullets entering the lungs and causing her death. The accused then went away, and on being arrested said “I suppose I will be hung for this.” The frequent strange demeanour and behaviour of Anglin towards his wife would render it necessary for the jury to consider whether the prisoner was labouring under a delusion and was to some extent out of his mind, or whether he was sane and conscious of the awful deed he was committing when he murdered his wife. The remark which the accused made on being arrested went a long way to a reasonable man to show that he knew what he was doing when he killed his wife. Anglin received 16 years at Pentridge Prison. On passing sentence his Honour remarking that the question which they would have to consider was not whether the prisoner murdered his wife, but merely whether he was sane or insane at the time.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 18, 1923

When Constable Davies, of Hawthorn, was assisting Samuel Lazarus, aged 76 years, of Alma road, Camberwell, across the road at the corner of Leura grove and Burke road, Camberwell, Lazarus was struck by a passing motor-lorry. He was taken to the Alfred Hospital, where he died shortly after admittance. Lazarus, who was a cripple, had alighted from a tram on which Constable Davies had been travelling. The driver of the motor-lorry, David Robert Burns, aged 30 yean, carrier, of Burke road, South Camberwell, was charged with manslaughter.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 13th April 1940

EAST HAWTHORN

Douglas Ernest Evans aged 27, of Hawthorn, was committed for trial on a charge of having murdered James Charles Edwards aged 47, on this day in 1940. Senior-Detective Deslamen said that Evans had told the police that he was at the garage in Burke road, Camberwell, where Edwards was murdered on April 13, from 11.40am to 12.00pm, and that an Air Force man who was there also was angry Edwards about some repair work to a car he had done. Evans was charged with the murder.

 

On this day ……… 31st of March 1917

Accident was caused on platform No.3, at Flinders-street station on this day in 1917. When the 12.52 pm, train arrived several people were struck and knocked down by an open door of a compartment of the incoming train from Camberwell. The names of the people struck by the door were either bruised or cut are:—Stephen Butler, G. Smith, G. Myers, W. Berudt and G. Haywury.

 

 

The Clockface type traffic control signal was designed by Charles Marshall in 1936-37 and manufactured by his manufacturing engineering firm Charles Marshall Pty Ltd, of Fitzroy. This type of signal was used at about 35 Melbourne intersections between the late 1930s and the 1960s. The signal has two large discs, each approximately 3-ft (1 metre) in diameter set at right angles at the top of a 15-ft (4.57 metre) high mast with dial faces on either side of each disc designed to face the oncoming traffic on all four roads at a right-angle crossroad intersection. A large white indicator hand or pointer on each the dial face swept through red, yellow and green sectors of the face to indicate stop and go intervals. The prototype Marshalite unit was installed at the intersection of Gertrude Street and Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, in 1937, at the expense of the company with the permission of the Fitzroy City Council. It lasted only a short period before having to be dismantled after falling foul of the law. A Fitzroy councillor who had been booked for driving against the signals contested his fine in court and won on the grounds that the signals were not the property of the Fitzroy Council and therefore were operating without legal jurisdiction and so where ordered to be removed. The Second World War then intervened hampering further development and it was not until 1945 that a second example was installed (with appropriate approvals) on the corner of Johnson and Brunswick Streets, Fitzroy. Over the next 15 years a number of Marshalite signals were installed at main road intersections in Fitzroy, Clifton Hill, Northcote, Coburg, Richmond, Malvern, Camberwell and along the Neapan Highway through Chelsea. Originally the dials on the Marshalite signals had only green and red sectors, with a rotating indicator lamp instead of the pointer, but later an orange or amber sector was later added at the request of the Traffic Police to give motorists approaching the intersection at speed a warning of the impending change from green to red, and a plain white pointer was used instead of the rotating lamp, with the whole dial illuminated by an overhead lamp at night. Contrary to popular misconception, Marshalite signals always operated in conjuction with more conventional traffic lights positioned on each corner of the intersection, which were connected as slave signals controlled by the operation of the master Marshalite signal, which stood on either in the centre of the intersection or on the most prominent corner. Initially these traffic lights had only two lamps showing green and red, with a third amber lamp added when the intermediate colour was also added to the Marshalite dials.

 

ON THIS DAY – December 25, 1888

At the Melbourne Supreme Court, John Anglin was charged with the murder of his wife, Jemima Caroline, by shooting her at the residence of her brother in law, Mr Herbert John Rhodes, Inglesby road, Camberwell, on the 25th December. Anglin had been married to his wife for nine years before the murder. The accused was always exceedingly jealous of his wife, and strange and eccentric in his behaviour towards her, labouring under some delusion concerning her faithfulness. In consequence of that delusion, he used to strike her, and treated her abominably. She had ultimately to leave him, owing to his violence and jealously, mid supported herself by teaching music. At the time of the murder she was stopping with her sister, Mrs. Rhodes, at Camberwell. The prisoner called at the place on Christmas Day, and said he wanted to see his children Mr Rhodes ordered him away, and, as he did not leave, went to the yard and took an axe, with the view of frightening the prisoner away. On Mr Rhodes reappearing at the door with the axe in his hand, the accused shot at him, and on Mrs. Anglin coming out of the dining room into the passage to ascertain the cause of the discharge of firearms the prisoner shot her also, and followed her into the house, where he shot her again one of the bullets entering the lungs and causing her death. The accused then went away, and on being arrested said “I suppose I will be hung for this.” The frequent strange demeanour and behaviour of Anglin towards his wife would render it necessary for the jury to consider whether the prisoner was labouring under a delusion and was to some extent out of his mind, or whether he was sane and conscious of the awful deed he was committing when he murdered his wife. The remark which the accused made on being arrested went a long way to a reasonable man to show that he knew what he was doing when he killed his wife. Anglin received 16 years at Pentridge Prison. On passing sentence his Honour remarking that the question which they would have to consider was not whether the prisoner murdered his wife, but merely whether he was sane or insane at the time.

 

On this day …….. 25th of December 1916

An aggressive tiger snake which attacked Private Frederick Thoroughgood, a soldier who had been invalided home deaf and dumb from Gallipoli, was the means of his regaining both his speech and hearing. Private Thoroughgood, who since his return has been an inmate of the Camberwell Convalescent Home, Mont Albert-road, attended a picnic at Warrandyte on Christmas day. While walking through the bush he almost trod on the snake, which immediately showed fight, and Thoroughgood, after a short encounter, despatched the reptile with a stick. The affray excited Thoroughgood somewhat, and a little later his companions were surprised to hear him commence whistling. Shortly afterwards he asked in a normal voice, “Well, what’s the next item on the programme ?” Speech and hearing came to him, simultaneously, being doubtless the best Christmas box that he could have desired.