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ON THIS DAY – JULY 7, 1929

Charged with the killing of Mark Devaney, aged 54, George Ernest Davis was arrested today. He will appear at Wodonga Court on October 17.

Mr. Mark Devaney (aged 64 years), of Wodonga Estate, Wodonga, a retired farmer, was found dead on the
Bonegilla-road, about a mile from Wodonga, on Sunday night. He had evidently been hit by a motor car, as
there was a quantity of broken glass near by, and much blood. The glass is thought to have been from the headlight of a car. There is no evidence to show that the driver of the car stopped. No one notified the police of the accident. Devaney leaves a widow and two daughters.

On this day …….. 30th of June 1908

Australia’s love affair with the car as a means of travelling the continent’s huge distances began with the first transcontinental motor car trip. Engineer Horace Hooper Murrag Aunger was born on 28 April 1878 at Narridy, near Clare, South Australia. He collaborated with cycle maker Vivian Lewis and Tom O’Grady to build the first petrol-driven motorcar in South Australia. Aunger teamed up with Henry Hampden Dutton to be the first to cross Australia from south to north by motorcar. Their first attempt left Adelaide in Dutton’s Talbot car on 25 November 1907, and travelled north through countryside suitable only for a modern 4WD. When the pinion in the Talbot’s differential collapsed south of Tennant Creek, the car had to be abandoned as the wet season was approaching. Travelling on horseback, the men met the railhead at Oodnadatta, from where they returned to Adelaide. Dutton then purchased a larger, more powerful vehicle, again a Talbot. Then men made their second attempt to cross the continent from south to north, leaving Adelaide on 30 June 1908. They were joined at Alice Springs by Ern Allchurch. Reaching the abandoned Talbot at Tennant Creek, the car was repaired, and they drove in convoy to Pine Creek, where the original Talbot was freighted by train to Darwin. The men continued in the second Talbot, reaching Darwin on 20 August 1908. The car in which the men completed their journey now sits preserved in the Birdwood museum, South Australia.

ON THIS DAY ……. 9th April 1927

Neville Currey, aged 29 years, manufacturing chemist, was charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of William Charles Lyte on this day in 1927. Evidence was given that Currey was driving a car at Malvern when he knocked down and killed Lyte, who was 60 years of age. After the accident Currey continued on and was pursued for a distance of two miles by another car driven by Miss Florence Mitchell. Currey’s car number was obtained, and he was later arrested by the police. In evidence Currey said that he was unaware of the fact that his car had knocked the old man down. He had a quantity of tackle in the rear of his car, and he suggested that the noise of this rattling had prevented him from hearing the noise of the collision. It was contended by the Crown that Currey was guilty of negligence in not keeping a proper look out when driving. After a brief retirement the jury returned a verdict if not guilty and Currey was discharged.

 

On this day …….. 12th of December 1935

A uniform Give Way to the Right law had been urged by the Royal Automobile Club of Victoria since 1913, but it was legal until this day in 1935. The reason the decision was made to give way to the right was because, in wet weather, the driver of a vehicle had a better chance of seeing approaching traffic though the right side window.

 

ON THIS DAY – JULY 7, 1929

Charged with the killing of Mark Devaney, aged 54, George Ernest Davis was arrested today. He will appear at Wodonga Court on October 17.

Mr. Mark Devaney (aged 64 years), of Wodonga Estate, Wodonga, a retired farmer, was found dead on the
Bonegilla-road, about a mile from Wodonga, on Sunday night. He had evidently been hit by a motor car, as
there was a quantity of broken glass near by, and much blood. The glass is thought to have been from the headlight of a car. There is no evidence to show that the driver of the car stopped. No one notified the police of the accident. Devaney leaves a widow and two daughters.

On this day …….. 30th of June 1908

Australia’s love affair with the car as a means of travelling the continent’s huge distances began with the first transcontinental motor car trip. Engineer Horace Hooper Murrag Aunger was born on 28 April 1878 at Narridy, near Clare, South Australia. He collaborated with cycle maker Vivian Lewis and Tom O’Grady to build the first petrol-driven motorcar in South Australia. Aunger teamed up with Henry Hampden Dutton to be the first to cross Australia from south to north by motorcar. Their first attempt left Adelaide in Dutton’s Talbot car on 25 November 1907, and travelled north through countryside suitable only for a modern 4WD. When the pinion in the Talbot’s differential collapsed south of Tennant Creek, the car had to be abandoned as the wet season was approaching. Travelling on horseback, the men met the railhead at Oodnadatta, from where they returned to Adelaide. Dutton then purchased a larger, more powerful vehicle, again a Talbot. Then men made their second attempt to cross the continent from south to north, leaving Adelaide on 30 June 1908. They were joined at Alice Springs by Ern Allchurch. Reaching the abandoned Talbot at Tennant Creek, the car was repaired, and they drove in convoy to Pine Creek, where the original Talbot was freighted by train to Darwin. The men continued in the second Talbot, reaching Darwin on 20 August 1908. The car in which the men completed their journey now sits preserved in the Birdwood museum, South Australia.

ON THIS DAY ……. 9th April 1927

Neville Currey, aged 29 years, manufacturing chemist, was charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of William Charles Lyte on this day in 1927. Evidence was given that Currey was driving a car at Malvern when he knocked down and killed Lyte, who was 60 years of age. After the accident Currey continued on and was pursued for a distance of two miles by another car driven by Miss Florence Mitchell. Currey’s car number was obtained, and he was later arrested by the police. In evidence Currey said that he was unaware of the fact that his car had knocked the old man down. He had a quantity of tackle in the rear of his car, and he suggested that the noise of this rattling had prevented him from hearing the noise of the collision. It was contended by the Crown that Currey was guilty of negligence in not keeping a proper look out when driving. After a brief retirement the jury returned a verdict if not guilty and Currey was discharged.

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 12th March 2006

On this day police charged a man with reversing further than necessary, after he drove backwards for more than 40km along one of Australia’s busiest highway. They stopped the 23 year old man on the Hume highway between Sydney and Melbourne as he was heading home to Numurkah 90km further on. He explained that reverse was the only gear in the car that worked. The man was also charged with driving without a licence.

 

 

On this day …….. 12th of December 1935

A uniform Give Way to the Right law had been urged by the Royal Automobile Club of Victoria since 1913, but it was legal until this day in 1935. The reason the decision was made to give way to the right was because, in wet weather, the driver of a vehicle had a better chance of seeing approaching traffic though the right side window.

 

ON THIS DAY – JULY 7, 1929

Charged with the killing of Mark Devaney, aged 54, George Ernest Davis was arrested today. He will appear at Wodonga Court on October 17.

Mr. Mark Devaney (aged 64 years), of Wodonga Estate, Wodonga, a retired farmer, was found dead on the
Bonegilla-road, about a mile from Wodonga, on Sunday night. He had evidently been hit by a motor car, as
there was a quantity of broken glass near by, and much blood. The glass is thought to have been from the headlight of a car. There is no evidence to show that the driver of the car stopped. No one notified the police of the accident. Devaney leaves a widow and two daughters.

On this day …….. 30th of June 1908

Australia’s love affair with the car as a means of travelling the continent’s huge distances began with the first transcontinental motor car trip. Engineer Horace Hooper Murrag Aunger was born on 28 April 1878 at Narridy, near Clare, South Australia. He collaborated with cycle maker Vivian Lewis and Tom O’Grady to build the first petrol-driven motorcar in South Australia. Aunger teamed up with Henry Hampden Dutton to be the first to cross Australia from south to north by motorcar. Their first attempt left Adelaide in Dutton’s Talbot car on 25 November 1907, and travelled north through countryside suitable only for a modern 4WD. When the pinion in the Talbot’s differential collapsed south of Tennant Creek, the car had to be abandoned as the wet season was approaching. Travelling on horseback, the men met the railhead at Oodnadatta, from where they returned to Adelaide. Dutton then purchased a larger, more powerful vehicle, again a Talbot. Then men made their second attempt to cross the continent from south to north, leaving Adelaide on 30 June 1908. They were joined at Alice Springs by Ern Allchurch. Reaching the abandoned Talbot at Tennant Creek, the car was repaired, and they drove in convoy to Pine Creek, where the original Talbot was freighted by train to Darwin. The men continued in the second Talbot, reaching Darwin on 20 August 1908. The car in which the men completed their journey now sits preserved in the Birdwood museum, South Australia.

ON THIS DAY ……. 9th April 1927

Neville Currey, aged 29 years, manufacturing chemist, was charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of William Charles Lyte on this day in 1927. Evidence was given that Currey was driving a car at Malvern when he knocked down and killed Lyte, who was 60 years of age. After the accident Currey continued on and was pursued for a distance of two miles by another car driven by Miss Florence Mitchell. Currey’s car number was obtained, and he was later arrested by the police. In evidence Currey said that he was unaware of the fact that his car had knocked the old man down. He had a quantity of tackle in the rear of his car, and he suggested that the noise of this rattling had prevented him from hearing the noise of the collision. It was contended by the Crown that Currey was guilty of negligence in not keeping a proper look out when driving. After a brief retirement the jury returned a verdict if not guilty and Currey was discharged.