Posts

On this day …….. 1st of August 1896

One of the central figures involved on the police side during the Kelly Gang Outbreak of the 1870s retired on this day in 1896. Sgt. Arthur Loftus Maule Steele handed over control Wangaratta police to Sgt. Simcocks transferred from Chiltern.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 20, 1966

CHILTERN

15 lights of a semi-trailer rammed by a passenger bus near Chiltern should have been visible to anyone following it, the prosecutor, Mr J. F. Howse, said in the Supreme Court. He said that shortly before the crash, in which five passengers in a Red line Bus were killed, the transport had been negotiating a long, sweeping bend. This meant the truck’s eight rear lights and six or seven sidelights would have been visible lo anyone following. Mr Howse was opening the trial of Clarence Joseph Cook, 43, of Walker Street, Yass. bus driver, who has pleaded not guilty to five charges of manslaughter. Cook was driving the bus from Yass lo Melbourne on June 20 when it ran into the rear of a transport driven by Ian Robert Sams, of Hinnema Street, Panania, Sydney. The jury was taken by bus lo inspect the crash scene and the section of the Hume Highway leading to the area, 172, miles from Melbourne, this afternoon. The trial will continue be fore Mr Justice Lush tomorrow.

 

On This Day……… 9th April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was shot on this day in 1865, at a homestead at Peechelba. He layed wounded for a number of hours with out medical attention, before dying at 2:15pm. His body was taken to the woolshed, and placed on public display. Photographers from Beechworth and Chiltern arrived and took photos of his corpse. John Wendlan, the man who shot him also had his photo taken. Pieces of Morgan’s beard and hair began to disappear to souvenir hunters.

 

 

On this day …….. 1st of August 1896

One of the central figures involved on the police side during the Kelly Gang Outbreak of the 1870s retired on this day in 1896. Sgt. Arthur Loftus Maule Steele handed over control Wangaratta police to Sgt. Simcocks transferred from Chiltern.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 20, 1966

CHILTERN

15 lights of a semi-trailer rammed by a passenger bus near Chiltern should have been visible to anyone following it, the prosecutor, Mr J. F. Howse, said in the Supreme Court. He said that shortly before the crash, in which five passengers in a Red line Bus were killed, the transport had been negotiating a long, sweeping bend. This meant the truck’s eight rear lights and six or seven sidelights would have been visible lo anyone following. Mr Howse was opening the trial of Clarence Joseph Cook, 43, of Walker Street, Yass. bus driver, who has pleaded not guilty to five charges of manslaughter. Cook was driving the bus from Yass lo Melbourne on June 20 when it ran into the rear of a transport driven by Ian Robert Sams, of Hinnema Street, Panania, Sydney. The jury was taken by bus lo inspect the crash scene and the section of the Hume Highway leading to the area, 172, miles from Melbourne, this afternoon. The trial will continue be fore Mr Justice Lush tomorrow.

 

On This Day ……. 16th May 1860

One of the larger than life characters of the early gold rush in North East Victoria was locked up in the Beechworth Gaol on this day in 1860. Doctor Radley had been practising in Chiltern, where there was some doubt about him being qualified doctor. Popular opinion was that he was an aristocrat named Jowitt, in hiding from some overseas scandal. He was certainly a man of considerable talent. During his time in Beechworth Gaol awaiting trail for manslaughter, (for a treatment that didn’t work out), he helped the inmates of the gaol prepare briefs for their trials. He was later tried in Melbourne, and then turned up in Sydney conducting a radical newspaper, exposing the alleged mis-deeds of Sydney society.

On this day …….. 4th May 1878

On this day in 1878, Henry Audin attached a locally made telephone to the telegraph wire and sent a message across the border (Murray River) to Wahgunyah through Chiltern and Wodonga to arrive in Albury in the blink of an eye.  The listener at the other end of the phone heard the word …………. Cooeeee. This was the second interstate phone to ever be made. The first inter state phone call to be made was done three months earlier by Mr. McGuaran manager of the Albury telegraph office to Mr Cheyne of the Wodonga telegraph office.

On This Day……… 9th April 1865

The notorious bushranger Dan Morgan was shot on this day in 1865, at a homestead at Peechelba. He layed wounded for a number of hours with out medical attention, before dying at 2:15pm. His body was taken to the woolshed, and placed on public display. Photographers from Beechworth and Chiltern arrived and took photos of his corps. John Wendlan, the man who shot him also had his photo taken. Pieces of Morgan’s beard and hair began to disappear to souvenir hunters.

 

 

On This Day……… 1st April 1860

Celebrating ancient festivals came easily to new gold rush settlements. Chiltern in North East Victoria, was only a few months old when April Fools Day came around in 1860, but did they forget their ancient customs? Unfortunate doctors and lawyers, whose sleep was disturbed by midnight calls to attend imaginary emergencies, and to take death – bed wills at 3am from soundly sleeping men in robust health, would mutter an emphatic “no”. According to the Chiltern Standard, half the towns business and professional people were got out of bed under one pretext or another.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 29th March 1900

Sir John McEwen was born in Chiltern, on this day in 1900. His father died in 1907 and consequently McEwen was raised by his grandmother with her sister. He was educated at state schools and at 15 became a junior public service clerk. He enlisted in the Army immediately upon turning 18 but the First World War ended while he was still in training. He commenced dairy farming at Tongala (Victoria), near Shepparton, and then changed to sheep and cattle farming in nearby Stanhope. McEwen was the 18th Prime Minister of Australia. He was the last member of the Country Party to serve as prime minister. He was nicknamed “Black Jack” by Robert Menzies due to his dark ‘beetle-browed’ appearance and temper.

 

 

On this day ………… 11th March 1872

Unlike many fires in the North East of Victoria which seemed to happen on a Saturday night, this Chiltern fire happened on a Monday night. At 2am the fire began in an unoccupied building, in almost the same part of the town as the fire two years earlier. The adjoining premised on the western side, Mr Holloway’s the bootmaker, was next to go, then to the East, three more buildings went up. MR Bennett the watchmaker (a sufferer in the 1870 fire as well) , Mr Loftus the baker, and Mr Chaffer’s corner fancy goods store. Mr Peel’s Hotel and the whole of the other side of the street had a narrow escape.

 

 

On this day ………… 3rd March 1870

In the early hours of the morning on this day in 1870, the great fire of Chiltern began. Flames were noticed in the store of Mr JH Ferrier and alarm was raised. Within three quarters of an hour, the whole block of buildings was alight, from McLeans Corner to Corry’s. The heat was so intense that buildings on the other side of the street were smoking, and the energetic efforts by the local people kept the fire from spreading further. When the smoke and ash settled, seven shops had gone – McLeans and Ferrier’s Store, Graham’s Boot Shop, Crofts the Tailor, Manson’s the Drapers, Bennett’s the Watchmakers and Corry’s Store. Mr Bennett the watchmaker was to have a repeat experience two years later almost to the day, in another Chiltern fire.