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On This Day……… 8th April 1872

The first flogging in the Beechworth Gaol took place on this day in 1872. The victim was a chinaman call Ah King, convicted of an indecent exposure. He was tied to a wooden tripod, which was known as being married to the three sisters. The prison received 17 lashes from the cat of nine tails by a fallow prisoner. The flogging was extremely distasteful to all concerned, and when the time came for the second series of lashes, there were no volunteers. The victim had to be sent to Melbourne, where the state executioner would have no such scruples.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – November 17, 1889

Constable Coffey on Friday night arrested a man named John Caffrey on a charge of wilfully murdering Ah Gayong in Market-lane on November 17. It will be remembered that the Chinaman was killed by a couple of roughs who attacked him without any provocation.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 29th September 1906

The eccentric conduct of a Chinaman named Hey Soon, a month ago led lo his being sent to the Geelong gaol, and he became so much enamoured of that establishment that when his term of imprisonment expired on this day on 1906 he refused to leave. He would not even part with his prison clothes, and when an attempt was made to dispossess him of tho garments he became, so excited that it was not deemed advisable then to release him. He was formally charged with offensive behaviour at the police court, and remanded for one week.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th August 1871

A most deliberate and cruel murder of a Chinaman was committed on the Beechworth- Myrtleford Road. Two Chinamen in a cart named Ah Woo and Ah Cow, were stopped by James Quinn who offered them a shilling for a ride, which they agreed. Not 30 yards down the track Quinn attacked Ah Cow so violently that the Chinaman passed out. Quinn then threw his lifeless body from the cart. A struggle then began between Ah Woo and Quinn until Ah Woo was also unconscious. Stopping the cart Quinn then drowned Ah Woo in a water race beside the road.

Witness watched as Quinn took 40 pounds from his victim, before running into the hills. The police under the guidance of Inspector Smith were able to find Quinn, and had him brought to the Beechworth Goal were four witnesses identified him as the killer. Quinn murder trial was on the 14th of October 1871 in the Beechworth Circuit Court. The Judge Sir Redmond Barry, known as the hanging Judge, presided over the case, which finished at midnight. On passing the death sentence Sir Redmond asked James “do you have anything to say?” Quinn replied “It’s not my fault, my wife made me do it.” On the morning of 14th of November at 9.00am Quinn was walked from the condemned man’s cell with Father Moran and Bamford the hangman. On reaching the gallows Quinn asked if he could speak, “I wish to say something. I am going to die an innocent man. I blame my wife for what has happened to me. She and her friends got me to come over from Tasmania and then they robbed me of 50 pounds.” Bamford then tied Quinn’s legs and his hands behind his back, placed a white hood over his head and a rope around his neck. Quinn said “She brought me to this, God Help Me.” The lever was pulled and Quinn dropped to his death After his execution it was discovered that the gates of the gaol had not been opened and the official witnesses, numbering 70 in total, hadn’t been let in. The gates were hastily opened but the public could only see Quinn’s lifeless body swinging from the rope. Quinn’s description after death was height 6 foot, black hair, hazel eyes, scar on left eyebrow, long scar on right shoulder and two scars on right breast

 

On this day …….. 18th of April 1877

A miner named Louis Cahoon, residing at Twist’s Creek was attacked by a lunatic who had escape from the Beechworth Asylum. While on his way to a neighbour house on this day in 1877, at 6 pm, was violently attacked in the dark.  As Cahoon was passing through a gate he saw a man hiding behind one of the posts. Not thinking of any harm, he simply said ‘Good night,’ but had scarcely finished his salutation with the man, whom he afterwards recognised as a Chinaman sprang at him, and a knife gleamed in his hand in the starlight as it went straight for his heart. Cahoon, who is a large man, and understands how to protest himself in an ordinary encounter, instinctively threw himself into self defence. But still received a stab in his left arm above the wrist and countering his assailant with the right, under the jaw, sent him to ground. Like lightning the maniac, for such he proved to be was on his feet, and again rushing at Cahoon repeated the stabbing, which he received this time in his left hand, near the thumb, and again countering, felled him, but this time so heavily that he did not arise so quickly. Seeing matter so desperate, Cahoon then armed himself with a stick, and again knocked his would be assassin down as be came on for a third time, but not before Cahoon, in delivering his last blow, received a third stab, this time in the right arm. This seemed to bring the Chinaman to his senses, for on his recovering his feet on this occasion he made off into the darkness, and was not arrested until 21st of April, when Mounted constable Shoebridge traced him to Rocky Point. Luckily for Cahoon, and not a little owing to his determination, the wounds are not serious, as the knife was stopped by the bone, and the others being merely superficial.

On This Day……… 8th April 1872

The first flogging in the Beechworth Gaol took place on this day in 1872. The victim was a chinaman call Ah King, convicted of an indecent exposure. He was tied to a wooden tripod, which was known as being married to the three sisters. The prison received 17 lashes from the cat of nine tails by a fallow prisoner. The flogging was extremely distasteful to all concerned, and when the time came for the second series of lashes, there were no volunteers. The victim had to be sent to Melbourne, where the state executioner would have no such scruples.

 

 

EXECUTION THIS DAY ……… March 10, 1866

CASTLEMAINE

At 10am on the 10th of March 1866, at the Castlemaine Gaol, a Chinaman named Long Poy, was executed for murder. Before the execution, the Rev Mr Allnutt attended the criminal, with James Ah Coy, interpreter of Castlemaine. Long Poy was deeply affected and resigned to his fate. He still gave the same account of the murder as at his trial. When the Sheriff entered the condemned cell, the unfortunate man gave himself up quietly, and walked out after the Sheriff and Governor of the Gaol to the drop, which is immediately outside that cell on the gallery, and whilst the funeral service was being read in the usual way (Long Poy being a Christian) and whilst the hangman tied his arms to his sides, pulled the white cap over his face, and adjusted the rope, the convict spoke several times in Chinese, chiefly about his brother caring for his young wife, a Sydney native, and infant, so long as she remained unmarried; also about sending her to her parents to Sydney, and further saying that if she wished to get married she was not to be prevented doing so. Whilst so talking, blindfolded, in a strong clear unfaltering voice, and warning his brother against quarrelling, the fatal bolt was drawn and the body fell with a shock, dislocating the neck, the feet being then suspended about two feet from the flags of the corridor, There was not much convulsion of the body perceptible, but the feet and legs trembled so as to cast off the left boot. The pulse did not cease wholly to beat for eight minutes after the fall; in Young’s case, a powerful man, he died in less than one minute, but the deceased was of slight build. MThere is little about the formation of this place of execution to give the feeling of horror connected with the old gallows. It is a simple yet perfect contrivance; a broad board forms part of the crossing of the gallery floor, with a beam above it, appearing a portion of the roofing, over which hung the rope, the only emblem of the painful scene thereto be enacted.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……… 5th February 1899

HORSHAM

A medical examination of the fracture skull of the Chinaman named Don Young in Horsham who’s body was found in a hut, showed that the fractures were caused before death by a blow from a blunt instrument. The coroner found the death was coursed by a person or persons unknown.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 26th January 1914

The Chinaman, Ah Lipp, alias Poen Hoon, who was arrested at the Warrnambool railway station on the 26th of January 1914 and brought before Mr. Williams, P.M., at the Police Court, charged with having opium in his possession in a form suitable for smoking and received 12 month. Ah Lipp arrived in Australia in 1894 aboard the ship Moon Myone.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – November 17, 1889

Constable Coffey on Friday night arrested a man named John Caffrey on a charge of wilfully murdering Ah Gayong in Market-lane on November 17. It will be remembered that the Chinaman was killed by a couple of roughs who attacked him without any provocation.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 29th September 1906

The eccentric conduct of a Chinaman named Hey Soon, a month ago led lo his being sent to the Geelong gaol, and he became so much enamoured of that establishment that when his term of imprisonment expired on this day on 1906 he refused to leave. He would not even part with his prison clothes, and when an attempt was made to dispossess him of tho garments he became, so excited that it was not deemed advisable then to release him. He was formally charged with offensive behaviour at the police court, and remanded for one week.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th August 1871

A most deliberate and cruel murder of a Chinaman was committed on the Beechworth- Myrtleford Road. Two Chinamen in a cart named Ah Woo and Ah Cow, were stopped by James Quinn who offered them a shilling for a ride, which they agreed. Not 30 yards down the track Quinn attacked Ah Cow so violently that the Chinaman passed out. Quinn then threw his lifeless body from the cart. A struggle then began between Ah Woo and Quinn until Ah Woo was also unconscious. Stopping the cart Quinn then drowned Ah Woo in a water race beside the road.

Witness watched as Quinn took 40 pounds from his victim, before running into the hills. The police under the guidance of Inspector Smith were able to find Quinn, and had him brought to the Beechworth Goal were four witnesses identified him as the killer. Quinn murder trial was on the 14th of October 1871 in the Beechworth Circuit Court. The Judge Sir Redmond Barry, known as the hanging Judge, presided over the case, which finished at midnight. On passing the death sentence Sir Redmond asked James “do you have anything to say?” Quinn replied “It’s not my fault, my wife made me do it.” On the morning of 14th of November at 9.00am Quinn was walked from the condemned man’s cell with Father Moran and Bamford the hangman. On reaching the gallows Quinn asked if he could speak, “I wish to say something. I am going to die an innocent man. I blame my wife for what has happened to me. She and her friends got me to come over from Tasmania and then they robbed me of 50 pounds.” Bamford then tied Quinn’s legs and his hands behind his back, placed a white hood over his head and a rope around his neck. Quinn said “She brought me to this, God Help Me.” The lever was pulled and Quinn dropped to his death After his execution it was discovered that the gates of the gaol had not been opened and the official witnesses, numbering 70 in total, hadn’t been let in. The gates were hastily opened but the public could only see Quinn’s lifeless body swinging from the rope. Quinn’s description after death was height 6 foot, black hair, hazel eyes, scar on left eyebrow, long scar on right shoulder and two scars on right breast