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Donald Maxfield was reported missing from Colac on the 13th of May, 1953. On the 1st of August 1953, the torso of a man was pulled from the Barwon River. Divers would eventually find the rest of Maxfield’s body, which had been dismembered and placed in kerosene tins and sunk in the Barwon River. ⁣

It was believed the Maxfield was attacked and bashed in a garage in Colac by two men. The men had placed the unconscious body of Maxfield in the boot of a car and had driven to Geelong. Maxfield regained consciousness and was again bashed to death on the banks of the Barwon. It was reported that this was a payback as it was believed that Maxfield had been a police informant against one of the men.⁣

The two men would later be arrested and information from them would lead to finding the rest of Maxfields body by divers recovering the torso after a 5 hour search of the river. The torso had been covered in an oat sack, wrapped in wire and weighed down with stone weights so that it was roughly 100lbs. The head and hands were later discovered in kerosene tins in the river. ⁣

Both men were charged with murder and sentenced to life imprisonment and 20 years respectively.⁣

On This Day ……. 1st of August 1953

Donald Maxfield was reported missing from Colac on the 13th of May, 1953. He was a 22 year old labourer. On this day in 1953, the torso of a man was pulled from the Barwon River. Divers would eventually find the rest of Maxfield’s body, which had been dismembered and placed in kerosene tins and sunk in the Barwon River. It was believed the Maxfield was attacked and bashed in a garage in Colac by Andrew Kilpatrick and Russell Hill, aged 33 and 22 respectively, both from Colac. The men had placed the unconscious body of Maxfield in the boot of a car and had driven to Geelong. Maxfield regained consciousness and was again bashed to death on the banks of the Barwon. It was reported that this was a payback as it was believed that Maxfield had spoken to police about some of Kilpatrick’s dealings
Kilpatrick and Hill were arrested on the 1st August 1953 for the murder of Maxfield. Hill had confessed that with Kilpatrick, they had beaten Maxfield to death with an iron bar and then dismembered his body and thrown it in the Barwon. Information from Hill led to the divers recovering the torso after a 5 hour search of the river. The torso had been covered in an oat sack, wrapped in wire and weighed down with stone weights so that it was roughly 100lbs. The head and hands were later discovered in kerosene tins in the river. Both men were charged with murder and sent to trial in October 1953. Both Kilpatrick and Hill were sentenced to death. This was later commuted to life imprisonment with no remissions for Kilpatrick and 20 years with no remissions for Hill. Kilpatrick served his sentence in Pentridge, where he was a notorious figure because of his crime. He later became an ideal prisoner and was released on parole in 1976 after serving 23 years. Hill served his 20 years in the Geelong Gaol working in the prison library and other jobs.

 

On This Day ……. 14th June 1901

Three prisoners arrived under escort from Pentridge at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1901, where they complete their term of imprisonment under which they were sentenced. One of tho number included John Sissons, who was recently sentenced to three years’ imprisonment for a disgusting offence in Kardinia Park. He suffered considerably from fits at Pentridge, and the penal authorities decided to transfer him to the local gaol. A man named Joseph Laithwaite, who was convicted at Colac on a charge of unlawful assault was also lodged within the confines of the local gaol.

ON THIS DAY…… 18th November 1905

Man believes he was a motor car

The unfortunate man Keane, who created a sensation, at Colac by imagining be was a motor car and dashing head foremost into trees and buildings, is still in a demented condition in the Geelong gaol, where he was admitted a fortnight ago. He has almost recovered from the injuries received in his mad escapade, but his mental state is not improved. He has to be watched night and day by two special warders, and has been further remanded for medical treatment. Keane was transferred to Kew Lunatic Asylum.

On This Day – November 6, 1880

A resident of Ondit, near Colac, named Martin Tenas, a Belgian, aged 60, stabbed his wife, Bridget Theresa Tenas, aged 45, in four places on November 6, and afterwards cut his own throat. The persons had been married 20 years, and have six children. The man alleges jealousy as the cause of his action, but there appears no foundation for it. The wounded woman died two days afterwards, and the murderer subsequently made a voluntary statement, accusing his wife of infidelity, and stating that on the night when he stabbed her he heard a noise in the paddock, and went out, thinking it was the man he suspected. On his return his wife laughed at him, and he stabbed her. He afterwards cut his own throat, as he loved her and his children, and thought they had better die together. The prisoner has been committed for trial for wilful murder.

ON THIS DAY…… 18th October 1900

On this day in 1900, a youth named John Noonan was charged with fraudulently converting to his own use a bicycle valued at £9, the property of B. O’Callaghan. The accused pleaded guilty. Sergeant Dowler, who conducted the prosecution, gave particulars of the case, and called the complainant, O’Callaghan, who deposed that on the 7th inst. the defendant hired a bicycle to proceed to Mr Smith’s place at Stonyford. He said he would return either that night or the following morning, but he failed to keep his word. Witness subsequently saw Mr Smith, and ascertained that defendant had not called at his place. He was in Terang and discovered the bicycle in his brother’s shop there. It had been taken in for repairs, and had been kept until these were paid for. The accused here stated he intended returning the bicycle, but the axle broke, and he wanted to earn some money to pay for repairing it before he sent it back. He told the plaintiff’s brother that he did not own the bicycle and that it belonged to person in Colac, to whom he intended to return it. Sergeant Dowler said that the defendant told a’ different story to the arresting constable, informing him that the machine belonged to a man named Kelly. with whom lie had left £4 on it. The Bench stated that they would take into consideration the fact of tile defendant pleading guilty, and let him off lightly. He would be sentenced to seven days’ imprisomnent in the Geelong gaol, the Bench hoping that he would profit by the punishment.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 2nd October 1903

Tracey Evans was returned to the Geelong gaol from Creswick, where he received a sentence of six months’ imprisonment on the previous day for stealing a watch and chain and some wearing apparel. The sentence is cumulative on a period of 12 months’ imprisonment he is undergoing for larceny at Colac. He was escorted to Geelong by Constable Morgan.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th September 1904

Mary Bowman, the female swindler whose career in the Geelong district was short but lively, appeared at the police court before the police magistrate Mr. Patterson and Messrs. Pardey and Douglass, J’s.P. The prisoner, whose original name appears to be Mary Jean Sinclair, was charged with having, by false representations, obtained the sum of £1 from Mrs. Augustina Ran. of Germantown, and being a rogue and a vagabond. There were several other charges against her. and after a discussion with the P.M. as to the penalty she was liable to, it was decided by the police to rely on the one charge. The defendant, who presented a sullen attitude in the box, and would, not face the court, pleaded guilty. Augustina Ran gave evidence that she had a farm of four acres at Germantown. Accused came to her place on 19th September, and said she wanted to purchase a farm. Witness said the price was £325, and told her to do business with her son. Accused remained at the house that night and said she had a groat big station behind Colac, and gave her a cheque for £70 as part of the”purchase money. She said she had not enough money to pay a small account, and asked the witness for the loan of £1. promising to return two pounds for the one. “Witness said to her, “I don’t want two; I only want my own back.” Accused left next morning, and she did not get her pound back, and found the cheque valueless. Sergeant Hore, admitted that the accused, showing that she had been 17 years in gaol out, over the last 25 years in the country since she arrived from Glasgow. See was sent to Geelong Gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 25th September 1902

A former resident of Colac, James Reit, died at the Geelong Gaol on this day. He at one time occupied a good position, but fortune ceased to smile on him, and he came to an untimely end.

 

On This Day ……. 1st of August 1953

Donald Maxfield was reported missing from Colac on the 13th of May, 1953. He was a 22 year old labourer. On this day in 1953, the torso of a man was pulled from the Barwon River. Divers would eventually find the rest of Maxfield’s body, which had been dismembered and placed in kerosene tins and sunk in the Barwon River. It was believed the Maxfield was attacked and bashed in a garage in Colac by Andrew Kilpatrick and Russell Hill, aged 33 and 22 respectively, both from Colac. The men had placed the unconscious body of Maxfield in the boot of a car and had driven to Geelong. Maxfield regained consciousness and was again bashed to death on the banks of the Barwon. It was reported that this was a payback as it was believed that Maxfield had spoken to police about some of Kilpatrick’s dealings
Kilpatrick and Hill were arrested on the 1st August 1953 for the murder of Maxfield. Hill had confessed that with Kilpatrick, they had beaten Maxfield to death with an iron bar and then dismembered his body and thrown it in the Barwon. Information from Hill led to the divers recovering the torso after a 5 hour search of the river. The torso had been covered in an oat sack, wrapped in wire and weighed down with stone weights so that it was roughly 100lbs. The head and hands were later discovered in kerosene tins in the river. Both men were charged with murder and sent to trial in October 1953. Both Kilpatrick and Hill were sentenced to death. This was later commuted to life imprisonment with no remissions for Kilpatrick and 20 years with no remissions for Hill. Kilpatrick served his sentence in Pentridge, where he was a notorious figure because of his crime. He later became an ideal prisoner and was released on parole in 1976 after serving 23 years. Hill served his 20 years in the Geelong Gaol working in the prison library and other jobs.

 

On This Day ……. 14th June 1901

Three prisoners arrived under escort from Pentridge at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1901, where they complete their term of imprisonment under which they were sentenced. One of tho number included John Sissons, who was recently sentenced to three years’ imprisonment for a disgusting offence in Kardinia Park. He suffered considerably from fits at Pentridge, and the penal authorities decided to transfer him to the local gaol. A man named Joseph Laithwaite, who was convicted at Colac on a charge of unlawful assault was also lodged within the confines of the local gaol.

On This Day ……. 26th May 1904

A young man named John Smith, who was arrested at Colac by Senior-constable Arthur and Constable McKenzie for alleged ‘cattle stealing, has been brought into the Geelong gaol on remand. He was brought before the Geelong court a week later, and further to the gaol.