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On this day …….. 17th of June 1982

The driver and a fireman of a goods train were killed on this day in 1982, when their train ran into the rear of the Spirit of Progress in thick fog. Barnawartha in North East Victoria was shaken awake by the collision, which happened a 7:50am. The Spirit of Progress had been delayed by engine problems, and the guards had just time to jump for safety as the goods train hit. Had the goods train been fully laden it’s impact could have demolished a number of the passenger carriages of the Spirit. Barnawatha was wondering why so much drama happened in its neighbourhood. Less than a month before, there had been a head on collision between two semi trailers in which both drivers had been killed. A month after the rail tragedy, another semi trailer driver lost his life in an early morning crash at Black Dog Creek.

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

Albert Edward Quinlivan, 63 year-old driver of a train involved in a fatal collision at Moriac railway station on this day in 1952, was acquitted of a charge of manslaughter by a Jury in the Geelong Court. Mrs. Josephine Ethel Traynor aged 34, of Hawthorn East, died of injuries received in the collision.

 

On this day …….. 17th of June 1982

The driver and a fireman of a goods train were killed on this day in 1982, when their train ran into the rear of the Spirit of Progress in thick fog. Barnawartha in North East Victoria was shaken awake by the collision, which happened a 7:50am. The Spirit of Progress had been delayed by engine problems, and the guards had just time to jump for safety as the goods train hit. Had the goods train been fully laden it’s impact could have demolished a number of the passenger carriages of the Spirit. Barnawatha was wondering why so much drama happened in its neighbourhood. Less than a month before, there had been a head on collision between two semi trailers in which both drivers had been killed. A month after the rail tragedy, another semi trailer driver lost his life in an early morning crash at Black Dog Creek.

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

Alberti Edward Quinlivan, 63 year-old driver of a train involved in a fatal collision at Moriac railway station on this day in 1952, was acquitted of a charge of manslaughter by a Jury in the Geelong Court. Mrs. Josephine Ethel Traynor aged 34, of Hawthorn East, died of injuries received in the collision.

 

On This Day – February 10, 1964

HMAS Melbourne never fired a shot in anger during her career, having only peripheral, non-combat roles.

On the evening of 10 February 1964, HMAS Melbourne and HMAS Voyager were performing manoeuvres off Jervis Bay. Melbournes aircraft were performing flying exercises, and Voyager was tasked as plane guard, positioned behind and to port (left) of the carrier in order to rescue the crew of any ditching or crashing aircraft. After a series of turns effected to reverse the courses of the two ships, Voyager ended up ahead and to starboard (right) of the carrier. The destroyer was ordered to resume plane guard position, which would involve turning to starboard, away from the carrier, then looping around behind. Instead, Voyager began a starboard turn, but then came around to port. The bridge crew on Melbourne assumed that Voyager was zig-zagging to let the carrier overtake her, and would then assume her correct position. Senior personnel on Voyager were not paying attention to the manoeuvre. At 20:55, officers on both ships began desperate avoiding manoeuvres, but by then a collision was inevitable.

Melbourne struck Voyager at 20:56, with the carrier’s bow striking just behind the bridge and cutting the destroyer in two. Of the 314 aboard Voyager, 82 were killed, most of whom died immediately or were trapped in the heavy bow section, which sank after 10 minutes. The rest of the ship sank after midnight. Melbourne, although damaged, suffered no fatalities, and was able to sail to Sydney the next morning with most of the Voyager survivors aboard – the rest had been taken to the naval base HMAS Creswell.

A number of incidents, along with several minor collisions, shipboard accidents, and aircraft losses, led to the reputation that HMAS Melbourne was jinxed.

On This Day – January 12, 1922

COMMITTED FOR MANSLAUGHTER

A tragic occurrence on St.Kilda-road on this day in 1922, when a horse and cart, in which two men collided with a tramcar with the result that two passengers, Emily McKenzie, 34, single and Albert Villani, married, received fatal injuries. Charles Murphy, 32, labourer, was present in custody. Murphy climbed into the back of the cart, and assaulted the driver, George Whorlow, causing him to lose control of the horse. The coroner found that the collision was due to interference by Murphy with the driver of the cart and that Murphy was guilty of manslaughter.

 

On This Day – December 30, 1881

The Navigation Board commenccd an enquiry into the collision of the Julia Percy and Nelson, steamers, off Cape Otway, on Saturday last. The evidence showed that the night was fine and clear and the vessels lights distinctly seen.

On this day …….. 17th of June 1982

The driver and a fireman of a goods train were killed on this day in 1982, when their train ran into the rear of the Spirit of Progress in thick fog. Barnawartha in North East Victoria was shaken awake by the collision, which happened a 7:50am. The Spirit of Progress had been delayed by engine problems, and the guards had just time to jump for safety as the goods train hit. Had the goods train been fully laden it’s impact could have demolished a number of the passenger carriages of the Spirit. Barnawatha was wondering why so much drama happened in its neighbourhood. Less than a month before, there had been a head on collision between two semi trailers in which both drivers had been killed. A month after the rail tragedy, another semi trailer driver lost his life in an early morning crash at Black Dog Creek.

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

Alberti Edward Quinlivan, 63 year-old driver of a train involved in a fatal collision at Moriac railway station on this day in 1952, was acquitted of a charge of manslaughter by a Jury in the Geelong Court. Mrs. Josephine Ethel Traynor aged 34, of Hawthorn East, died of injuries received in the collision.

 

On This Day – February 10, 1964

HMAS Melbourne never fired a shot in anger during her career, having only peripheral, non-combat roles.

On the evening of 10 February 1964, HMAS Melbourne and HMAS Voyager were performing manoeuvres off Jervis Bay. Melbournes aircraft were performing flying exercises, and Voyager was tasked as plane guard, positioned behind and to port (left) of the carrier in order to rescue the crew of any ditching or crashing aircraft. After a series of turns effected to reverse the courses of the two ships, Voyager ended up ahead and to starboard (right) of the carrier. The destroyer was ordered to resume plane guard position, which would involve turning to starboard, away from the carrier, then looping around behind. Instead, Voyager began a starboard turn, but then came around to port. The bridge crew on Melbourne assumed that Voyager was zig-zagging to let the carrier overtake her, and would then assume her correct position. Senior personnel on Voyager were not paying attention to the manoeuvre. At 20:55, officers on both ships began desperate avoiding manoeuvres, but by then a collision was inevitable.

Melbourne struck Voyager at 20:56, with the carrier’s bow striking just behind the bridge and cutting the destroyer in two. Of the 314 aboard Voyager, 82 were killed, most of whom died immediately or were trapped in the heavy bow section, which sank after 10 minutes. The rest of the ship sank after midnight. Melbourne, although damaged, suffered no fatalities, and was able to sail to Sydney the next morning with most of the Voyager survivors aboard – the rest had been taken to the naval base HMAS Creswell.

A number of incidents, along with several minor collisions, shipboard accidents, and aircraft losses, led to the reputation that HMAS Melbourne was jinxed.

On This Day – January 12, 1922

COMMITTED FOR MANSLAUGHTER

A tragic occurrence on St.Kilda-road on this day in 1922, when a horse and cart, in which two men collided with a tramcar with the result that two passengers, Emily McKenzie, 34, single and Albert Villani, married, received fatal injuries. Charles Murphy, 32, labourer, was present in custody. Murphy climbed into the back of the cart, and assaulted the driver, George Whorlow, causing him to lose control of the horse. The coroner found that the collision was due to interference by Murphy with the driver of the cart and that Murphy was guilty of manslaughter.