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ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

On this day in 1952, a woman was killed and seven people were seriously injured when two passenger trains collided head on at Moriac, near Geelong, at 8:15pm. Both engines were derailed, and the first carriage of the Geelong-bound train was telescoped by the coal tender. The dead woman was in this carriage. The trains involved were the 3.25pm passenger train from Port Fairy to Geelong, and the 5.50pm train from Melbourne to Warrnambool, which passed through Geelong.

ONE SHUNTING

The Warrnambool-bound train had stopped at Moriac and was shunting into a siding to allow the other train to pass along the single track when the crash occurred. The impact hurled the Warrnambool-bound train backwards and the two engines, badly wrecked, coming to rest 30ft apart. One engine hung at an acute angle on its side and the crew were badly scalded by escaping steam. The crash was heard several miles away and hundreds of people rushed to the scene. Two ambulances were called from Geelong, and ambulance men joined railwaymen and volunteers in freeing the injured from badly damaged carriages.

MANY SHOCKED

Many other passengers were slightly hurt or badly affected by shock. They were treated on the spot. Mr. T. Mather, newsagent and postmaster at Moriac, said the noise of the crash startled him and he was on the scene in a matter of minutes. “There was great confusion,” he said. “People on the trains were calling out for help. Many feared a fire would break out. “However, we soon got relief gangs together and set to work to free those trapped in the wrecked carriage. One woman was dead, and a man seemed to be dead or dying.” Special buses were chartered by the Railway Department to convey the passengers to their destinations. The line was blocked, but repair gangs were soon at work clearing the debris.

ON THIS DAY – October 21, 1952

Bail was refused at the City Court today when William Wallace Preston, 49, of no fixed abode, was remanded until November 6 on a charge of murder. Preston is alleged to have murdered Phyllis Rachel Kerry, at Fitzroy, on or about October 20. Det.-Sgt. C. H. Petty said that early on October 21 police visited a house in Fitzroy where they found the naked body of Phyllis Kerry, who was known also as Preston.

“Phoned police”

Phyllis Kerry had been living With Preston as his de facto wife. Death was due to blows to the head. Last night, Sgt. Petty said, Preston’s solicitor telephoned the police. Later Preston called at the CIB Office, where he made certain admissions about the killing.

ON THIS DAY…… 14th August 1941

 

A case of Murder and Suicide.  On this day in 1941 the police discovered in a house in Clifton Hill, the bodies of a man and a woman believed to be Mr. and Mrs. Healey. They had been there for some time.

 

 

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

On this day in 1952, a woman was killed and seven people were seriously injured when two passenger trains collided head on at Moriac, near Geelong, at 8:15pm. Both engines were derailed, and the first carriage of the Geelong-bound train was telescoped by the coal tender. The dead woman was in this carriage. The trains involved were the 3.25pm passenger train from Port Fairy to Geelong, and the 5.50pm train from Melbourne to Warrnambool, which passed through Geelong.

ONE SHUNTING

The Warrnambool-bound train had stopped at Moriac and was shunting into a siding to allow the other train to pass along the single track when the crash occurred. The impact hurled the Warrnambool-bound train backwards and the two engines, badly wrecked, coming to rest 30ft apart. One engine hung at an acute angle on its side and the crew were badly scalded by escaping steam. The crash was heard several miles away and hundreds of people rushed to the scene. Two ambulances were called from Geelong, and ambulance men joined railwaymen and volunteers in freeing the injured from badly damaged carriages.

MANY SHOCKED

Many other passengers were slightly hurt or badly affected by shock. They were treated on the spot. Mr. T. Mather, newsagent and postmaster at Moriac, said the noise of the crash startled him and he was on the scene in a matter of minutes. “There was great confusion,” he said. “People on the trains were calling out for help. Many feared a fire would break out. “However, we soon got relief gangs together and set to work to free those trapped in the wrecked carriage. One woman was dead, and a man seemed to be dead or dying.” Special buses were chartered by the Railway Department to convey the passengers to their destinations. The line was blocked, but repair gangs were soon at work clearing the debris.

ON THIS DAY …….. 1st April 1901

HEALESVILLE

Catherine and Hester Brown, mother and daughter, were charged with the murder of a newly-born male child on this day in 1901, at Healesville. Hester Brown, in a statement made to the police, and which was read in court, admitted having given birth to an illegitimate male child on the same day. She saw the child after birth on the bed, and then fainted. On returning to consciousness she heard the infant breathing hard. Then she fell asleep. She was afterwards informed by her mother that the baby was dead, and that she and her mother had smothered and buried it. She knew where the child was buried, and so did her daughter Emma. She further said she had wished the infant to live, and that it was not her fault that it was not alive now. The jury found that the accused were guilty of concealment of birth.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 29th March 1934

F. W. Jackson, described as a soldier, who had recently returned from South Africa, was drinking in the Great Britain Hotel, Flinders street, when he created astonishment by asking those present, “‘Have you ever seen a man die?” At the same time he was mixing some white powder into a glass of soda water and asked a sailor who was present to call a policeman and an ambulance. He then drank the mixture, and in a few minutes he was dead.

 

 

On this day …….. 13th of January 1914

A horse valued at £25, belonging to the Messrs Young Bros., produce merchants, on this day in 1914, dropped dead in Eastwood-street, Ballarat from fright, consequent on seeing an elephant belonging to Wirths’ circus. The elephant was at the time drawing a wagon, the horse trembled violently. As the elephant approached the horse dropped dead.

 

On this day …….. 27th of December 1905

An inquest was held at Williamstown touching the death of Archibald Campbell Boyd, who was found dead under his bed on the 27th of December. On the same day his wife was discovered in the house with her arm broken. A verdict was returned by that death was due to natural causes.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 21, 1952

Bail was refused at the City Court today when William Wallace Preston, 49, of no fixed abode, was remanded until November 6 on a charge of murder. Preston is alleged to have murdered Phyllis Rachel Kerry, at Fitzroy, on or about October 20. Det.-Sgt. C. H. Petty said that early on October 21 police visited a house in Fitzroy where they found the naked body of Phyllis Kerry, who was known also as Preston.

“Phoned police”

Phyllis Kerry had been living With Preston as his de facto wife. Death was due to blows to the head. Last night, Sgt. Petty said, Preston’s solicitor telephoned the police. Later Preston called at the CIB Office, where he made certain admissions about the killing.

ON THIS DAY…… 14th August 1941

 

A case of Murder and Suicide.  On this day in 1941 the police discovered in a house in Clifton Hill, the bodies of a man and a woman believed to be Mr. and Mrs. Healey. They had been there for some time.

 

 

ON THIS DAY……. 12th April 1952

On this day in 1952, a woman was killed and seven people were seriously injured when two passenger trains collided head on at Moriac, near Geelong, at 8:15pm. Both engines were derailed, and the first carriage of the Geelong-bound train was telescoped by the coal tender. The dead woman was in this carriage. The trains involved were the 3.25pm passenger train from Port Fairy to Geelong, and the 5.50pm train from Melbourne to Warrnambool, which passed through Geelong.

ONE SHUNTING

The Warrnambool-bound train had stopped at Moriac and was shunting into a siding to allow the other train to pass along the single track when the crash occurred. The impact hurled the Warrnambool-bound train backwards and the two engines, badly wrecked, coming to rest 30ft apart. One engine hung at an acute angle on its side and the crew were badly scalded by escaping steam. The crash was heard several miles away and hundreds of people rushed to the scene. Two ambulances were called from Geelong, and ambulance men joined railwaymen and volunteers in freeing the injured from badly damaged carriages.

MANY SHOCKED

Many other passengers were slightly hurt or badly affected by shock. They were treated on the spot. Mr. T. Mather, newsagent and postmaster at Moriac, said the noise of the crash startled him and he was on the scene in a matter of minutes. “There was great confusion,” he said. “People on the trains were calling out for help. Many feared a fire would break out. “However, we soon got relief gangs together and set to work to free those trapped in the wrecked carriage. One woman was dead, and a man seemed to be dead or dying.” Special buses were chartered by the Railway Department to convey the passengers to their destinations. The line was blocked, but repair gangs were soon at work clearing the debris.

ON THIS DAY …….. 1st April 1901

HEALESVILLE

Catherine and Hester Brown, mother and daughter, were charged with the murder of a newly-born male child on this day in 1901, at Healesville. Hester Brown, in a statement made to the police, and which was read in court, admitted having given birth to an illegitimate male child on the same day. She saw the child after birth on the bed, and then fainted. On returning to consciousness she heard the infant breathing hard. Then she fell asleep. She was afterwards informed by her mother that the baby was dead, and that she and her mother had smothered and buried it. She knew where the child was buried, and so did her daughter Emma. She further said she had wished the infant to live, and that it was not her fault that it was not alive now. The jury found that the accused were guilty of concealment of birth.