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ON THIS DAY – JULY 7, 1948

CHARGED with having wounded Francis Gerald Ryan with intent to murder him, Eugene Francis Fitzpatrick, medical practitioner, of Como pde, Mentone, appeared before the Geelong City Court yesterday. He pleaded not guilty. Ryan, a fish merchant, of Derby st, Kensington, said that he and George Sevior went to Barwon Heads on July 6, and soon afterwards went to see Dr and Mrs Fitzpatrick, whom he had known for six or seven years, and who invited them to have tea with them. After tea he and Sevior, with the Fitzpatricks, went to his (Ryan’s) house and had some liquor. Later Mrs Fitzpatrick remarked that the doctor had had too much liquor, and should go to bed. Ryan offered to take the doctor home. After showing some resentment Fitzpatrick was assisted to the back door of his house. Mrs Fitzpatrick had remained behind so that her husband might drop off to sleep before she went in. Ryan returned home, and soon afterward, as he and Mrs Fitzpatrick were talking, he heard a row and a gunshot at the back of the house. He went to the back door and was shot in the right elbow.

“WERE GREAT FRIENDS”

To Mr R. V. Monahan, KC (for Fitzpatrick), Ryan said that he and the doctor were great friends, and no reason was given for the doctor wanting “to harm him.

George Francis Sevior, fish hawker, of Altona, said he went to bed about midnight. Ryan rushed into his room and said, “Get up quickly. Someone is shooting through the back door.” He heard several shots. Ryan went to the back door. A shot was fired, and Ryan was shot. He heard five shots fired.

“COME OUT, RYAN”

Senior-constable Simpson said he was called at 2am on July 7 by Ryan, who was accompanied by Sevior and Mrs Fitzpatrick. Five minutes later he heard a noise on the front verandah, and Fitzpatrick called out, “Open the door. I know Ryan is here. Come out, Ryan, you aren’t going to do that to me and get away with it.” Through the door he asked Fitzpatrick what was the matter. Fitzpatrick replied, “Let me in. I’ve shot Ryan, and I’ll shoot him again.” Witness opened the door and saw Fitzpatrick holding a gun. He seized him and took the gun away. At the Geelong detective office Fitzpatrick, when told that Ryan had been shot, said he “could not remember a thing about it.” The hearing was adjourned.

On This Day……… 8th April 1916

An accident, happened on this day in 1916 to Les. Martin, eldest son of Mr. J. Martin, railway employee. Martin with some other boys managed to obtained a dynamite cap, and to make it explode used a stone. The result being that young Martin was injured on both hands, and one of the other boys. Wm. Brooks, who was standing a distance off, was slightly injured on the side of the head. Martin was conveyed to the doctor at Inglewood, where it was found that the top of the thumb on one hand was blown off and the palm of the other hand injured.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – 12th December 1930

Dr. Arthur Bretherton, at the Coroner’s Court on this day 1930, was committed for trial on a charge of murdering Vera Wakeling, aged 23, milliner, of Windsor. The coroner found death was due to blood poisoning following illegal interference. Ball was fixed at 1600 pounds, with a surety of a like amount. Giving evidence two doctors of the Women’s Hospital said when Wakeling was admitted she told them Dr. Bretherton had operated on her for £10. They operated on her, but she died the next day. In the depositions the woman gave her name as Mrs. Vera Harrison and in her dying depositions stated her previous statement in relation to an illegal operation was correct.

 

ON THIS DAY – JULY 7, 1948

CHARGED with having wounded Francis Gerald Ryan with intent to murder him, Eugene Francis Fitzpatrick, medical practitioner, of Como pde, Mentone, appeared before the Geelong City Court yesterday. He pleaded not guilty. Ryan, a fish merchant, of Derby st, Kensington, said that he and George Sevior went to Barwon Heads on July 6, and soon afterwards went to see Dr and Mrs Fitzpatrick, whom he had known for six or seven years, and who invited them to have tea with them. After tea he and Sevior, with the Fitzpatricks, went to his (Ryan’s) house and had some liquor. Later Mrs Fitzpatrick remarked that the doctor had had too much liquor, and should go to bed. Ryan offered to take the doctor home. After showing some resentment Fitzpatrick was assisted to the back door of his house. Mrs Fitzpatrick had remained behind so that her husband might drop off to sleep before she went in. Ryan returned home, and soon afterward, as he and Mrs Fitzpatrick were talking, he heard a row and a gunshot at the back of the house. He went to the back door and was shot in the right elbow.

“WERE GREAT FRIENDS”

To Mr R. V. Monahan, KC (for Fitzpatrick), Ryan said that he and the doctor were great friends, and no reason was given for the doctor wanting “to harm him.

George Francis Sevior, fish hawker, of Altona, said he went to bed about midnight. Ryan rushed into his room and said, “Get up quickly. Someone is shooting through the back door.” He heard several shots. Ryan went to the back door. A shot was fired, and Ryan was shot. He heard five shots fired.

“COME OUT, RYAN”

Senior-constable Simpson said he was called at 2am on July 7 by Ryan, who was accompanied by Sevior and Mrs Fitzpatrick. Five minutes later he heard a noise on the front verandah, and Fitzpatrick called out, “Open the door. I know Ryan is here. Come out, Ryan, you aren’t going to do that to me and get away with it.” Through the door he asked Fitzpatrick what was the matter. Fitzpatrick replied, “Let me in. I’ve shot Ryan, and I’ll shoot him again.” Witness opened the door and saw Fitzpatrick holding a gun. He seized him and took the gun away. At the Geelong detective office Fitzpatrick, when told that Ryan had been shot, said he “could not remember a thing about it.” The hearing was adjourned.

On this day …….. 30th April 1933

Mrs George Deaton was playing golf at Sydney’s La Perouse course on this day in 1933 with her husband and daughter when she was hit in the left eye by a stray golf ball. Mrs Deaton was wearing. Glasses at the time and a pieces of broken glass lacerated her eyeball. Fortunately, a doctor was also playing golf on the course and gave her first aid, before moving her to the Coast Hospital for treatment. A year earlier the Deaton’s eight year old son, Leonard, was injured in a similar accident at the same course. On that occasion he was not as fortunate as his mother and lost the sight of an eye.

 

On This Day……… 8th April 1916

An accident, happened on this day in 1916 to Les. Martin, eldest son of Mr. J. Martin, railway employee. Martin with some other boys managed to obtained a dynamite cap, and to make it explode used a stone. The result being that young Martin was injured on both hands, and one of the other boys. Wm. Brooks, who was standing a distance off, was slightly injured on the side of the head. Martin was conveyed to the doctor at Inglewood, where it was found that the top of the thumb on one hand was blown off and the palm of the other hand injured.

 

 

On This Day……… 1st April 1860

Celebrating ancient festivals came easily to new gold rush settlements. Chiltern in North East Victoria, was only a few months old when April Fools Day came around in 1860, but did they forget their ancient customs? Unfortunate doctors and lawyers, whose sleep was disturbed by midnight calls to attend imaginary emergencies, and to take death – bed wills at 3am from soundly sleeping men in robust health, would mutter an emphatic “no”. According to the Chiltern Standard, half the towns business and professional people were got out of bed under one pretext or another.

 

 

On this day …… 26th January 1935

EPIDEMIC AT LIGHTHOUSE

DOCTOR’S 80-MILE DASH

CAUGHT in the throes of a serious epidemic of whooping cough, six children in the little community at Cape Otway Lighthouse were given relief by a doctor from Colac, who travelled 80 miles over rugged country in response to an urgent call. The children (three boys and three girls, whose ages range from two to 14 years) were attended by their parents for about a week, but when it was realised that the epidemic was spreading the Commonwealth Lighthouse Department in Melbourne was advised. One little girl is still seriously ill. Shortly before noon Mr. A. J. Copaul (headkeeper) communicated with Melbourne asking for medical assistance. The Lighthouse Department, after ascertaining that the epidemic was too serious to he handled by the district nurse at Apollo Bay a few miles away, advised the keeper, to telephone Colac for Dr. K. .Day. Dr. Day was on leave, but Dr. Brown readily agreed to go to the aid of the children. Fifteen minutes after receiving word of the trouble. Dr. Brown left by car for Hordern Vale, 70 miles distant. Travelling at 60 miles an hour, he arrived there at 3p.m., and was met by keepers from the lighthouse. The last 10 miles to the lighthouse were made on a buckboard conveyance, drawn by a horse, over burning sandhills. At 5 p.m. Dr. Brown was at the lighthouse and attending the children. He prescribed medicine and pronounced them all out of danger, although he said that little Audrey Rixon (aged -six years) was in a serious condition, and must be kept in bed until the crisis had passed. Speaking over the long-distance telephone Mr. Copaul said the epidemic started about a week ago, when his little son, Maurice, aged two years, became ill. The epidemic spread until six out of the 13 children at the lighthouse were suffering. They were flushed and feverish, he said, and unable to sleep at night. Never has there been such a unique hospital as that at Cape Otway. There are four lightkeepers with their wives and 13 children on the headland, and together they make a self contained community. Far from any educational centre the children have a school of their own the only lighthouse school in Australia. It is maintained by the Education Department, which provides a teacher. In winter the lighthouse can be approached only by bullock transport over 10 miles, of boggy country. The children were all on holiday when the epidemic swept the lighthouse.

ON THIS DAY – 12th December 1930

Dr. Arthur Bretherton, at the Coroner’s Court on this day 1930, was committed for trial on a charge of murdering Vera Wakeling, aged 23, milliner, of Windsor. The coroner found death was due to blood poisoning following illegal interference. Ball was fixed at 1600 pounds, with a surety of a like amount. Giving evidence two doctors of the Women’s Hospital said when Wakeling was admitted she told them Dr. Bretherton had operated on her for £10. They operated on her, but she died the next day. In the depositions the woman gave her name as Mrs. Vera Harrison and in her dying depositions stated her previous statement in relation to an illegal operation was correct.

 

ON THIS DAY – JULY 7, 1948

CHARGED with having wounded Francis Gerald Ryan with intent to murder him, Eugene Francis Fitzpatrick, medical practitioner, of Como pde, Mentone, appeared before the Geelong City Court yesterday. He pleaded not guilty. Ryan, a fish merchant, of Derby st, Kensington, said that he and George Sevior went to Barwon Heads on July 6, and soon afterwards went to see Dr and Mrs Fitzpatrick, whom he had known for six or seven years, and who invited them to have tea with them. After tea he and Sevior, with the Fitzpatricks, went to his (Ryan’s) house and had some liquor. Later Mrs Fitzpatrick remarked that the doctor had had too much liquor, and should go to bed. Ryan offered to take the doctor home. After showing some resentment Fitzpatrick was assisted to the back door of his house. Mrs Fitzpatrick had remained behind so that her husband might drop off to sleep before she went in. Ryan returned home, and soon afterward, as he and Mrs Fitzpatrick were talking, he heard a row and a gunshot at the back of the house. He went to the back door and was shot in the right elbow.

“WERE GREAT FRIENDS”

To Mr R. V. Monahan, KC (for Fitzpatrick), Ryan said that he and the doctor were great friends, and no reason was given for the doctor wanting “to harm him.

George Francis Sevior, fish hawker, of Altona, said he went to bed about midnight. Ryan rushed into his room and said, “Get up quickly. Someone is shooting through the back door.” He heard several shots. Ryan went to the back door. A shot was fired, and Ryan was shot. He heard five shots fired.

“COME OUT, RYAN”

Senior-constable Simpson said he was called at 2am on July 7 by Ryan, who was accompanied by Sevior and Mrs Fitzpatrick. Five minutes later he heard a noise on the front verandah, and Fitzpatrick called out, “Open the door. I know Ryan is here. Come out, Ryan, you aren’t going to do that to me and get away with it.” Through the door he asked Fitzpatrick what was the matter. Fitzpatrick replied, “Let me in. I’ve shot Ryan, and I’ll shoot him again.” Witness opened the door and saw Fitzpatrick holding a gun. He seized him and took the gun away. At the Geelong detective office Fitzpatrick, when told that Ryan had been shot, said he “could not remember a thing about it.” The hearing was adjourned.

On this day …….. 30th April 1933

Mrs George Deaton was playing golf at Sydney’s La Perouse course on this day in 1933 with her husband and daughter when she was hit in the left eye by a stray golf ball. Mrs Deaton was wearing. Glasses at the time and a pieces of broken glass lacerated her eyeball. Fortunately, a doctor was also playing golf on the course and gave her first aid, before moving her to the Coast Hospital for treatment. A year earlier the Deaton’s eight year old son, Leonard, was injured in a similar accident at the same course. On that occasion he was not as fortunate as his mother and lost the sight of an eye.

 

On This Day……… 8th April 1916

An accident, happened on this day in 1916 to Les. Martin, eldest son of Mr. J. Martin, railway employee. Martin with some other boys managed to obtained a dynamite cap, and to make it explode used a stone. The result being that young Martin was injured on both hands, and one of the other boys. Wm. Brooks, who was standing a distance off, was slightly injured on the side of the head. Martin was conveyed to the doctor at Inglewood, where it was found that the top of the thumb on one hand was blown off and the palm of the other hand injured.