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An accident, which we fear may prove fatal, occurred on Saturday last near the Culloden Castle.
A cow belonging to Mr Naylor of Duneed, was being driven along the street when she turned savage, rushing at the man who was driving her; he, however, was fortunate enough to get out of the way, and the enraged animal then turned upon a little girl of about four years of age named Cannell, throwing her down and fracturing her skull.
The child is now under the care of Dr. Reid at the hospital. After this the infuriated animal rushed into the dam, where her capers were soon put an end to by Constable Madden and Sergeant M’Sweeney.
Unfortunately the little girl did succumb to her injuries after being gored by the cow.  Sarah Cannell was just 4 years old when she died the following day. Sarah was admitted with a penetrating injury to the left side of her head with her brain exposed.  She developed paralysis and eventually died 24 hours later.
Sarah had been playing outside the Culloden Castle Hotel with a number of other children, when the cow came running down Latrobe Terrace followed closely by George Naylor and Angus McLean.  Donald Cameron had hidden behind a telegraph pole from the rampaging beast, when he noticed Sarah under its feet.  He picked up the little girl and took her to her parents house in Villamanta Street.
The cow was eventually chased into a dam where Sergeant McSweeney was taked with the unpleasant duty of shooting the cow.  It was not known what had set the cow on its destructive path.
Much of the inquest was taken up with the discussion on the legality of driving cattle through the town.  There was a by-law in place prohibiting the droving of cattle between the hours of 12 pm and 6am.  It was suggested that in future this law needed to be strictly enforced!

ON THIS DAY – February 7, 1889

CAMPBELL’S CREEK

James Fawkes was charged with wounding with intent to murder his uncle John Rogers at Campbell’s Creek, Castlemaine, on February 7. The prisoner went to his uncle’s house on February 7 and deliberately shot him in the head, and afterwards also wounded James Hocking when he tried to detain him. The evidence of Drs. Reid and Henderson went to show that the prisoner was not of sound mind. When asked to plead he said he was guilty, but the judge refused to take the plea, suspecting insanity, and caused the assignment of counsel (Dr. Quick) to conduct his defence. The judge summed up at length, and was evidently deeply moved. In the course of his remarks he said that counsel should have been previously assigned to the prisoner, and that it was not fair to leave it to the judge to find out the state of a prisoner’s mind. The gaol officer evidently thought that he was insane, yet the authorities had made no further investigation in the matter, and had he (the judge) not noticed that there was something wrong with the man his fate would have been sealed at the present moment. The jury found a verdict of guilty, adding that the prisoner was insane at the time of the committal of the offence. His Honour ordered his imprisonment during the pleasure of the Governor.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – February 7, 1889

CAMPBELL’S CREEK

James Fawkes was charged with wounding with intent to murder his uncle John Rogers at Campbell’s Creek, Castlemaine, on February 7. The prisoner went to his uncle’s house on February 7 and deliberately shot him in the head, and afterwards also wounded James Hocking when he tried to detain him. The evidence of Drs. Reid and Henderson went to show that the prisoner was not of sound mind. When asked to plead he said he was guilty, but the judge refused to take the plea, suspecting insanity, and caused the assignment of counsel (Dr. Quick) to conduct his defence. The judge summed up at length, and was evidently deeply moved. In the course of his remarks he said that counsel should have been previously assigned to the prisoner, and that it was not fair to leave it to the judge to find out the state of a prisoner’s mind. The gaol officer evidently thought that he was insane, yet the authorities had made no further investigation in the matter, and had he (the judge) not noticed that there was something wrong with the man his fate would have been sealed at the present moment. The jury found a verdict of guilty, adding that the prisoner was insane at the time of the committal of the offence. His Honour ordered his imprisonment during the pleasure of the Governor.