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September 7, 1869

Yesterday a prisoner named M’Henry, who at the last sittings of the General Sessions was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment
for stealing saddles, made his escape from the Geelong Gaol in a manner which leads to the presumption that he received assistance from outside.
M’Henry succeeded in changing his prison clothes in the water closet, and dolling an ordinary suit, which must have been left
there by some associates. He then eluded the eyes of the warders, and escaped from the neighborhood of the gaol, taking his way
through the town, for some of the cabmen on the Market Square stand, observed him hurrying through the streets, with a handkerchief tied over his head. They knew him, but supposed that he had served his sentence, and was discharged, and it was only on learning different an hour after, that information was given
to the police.  Chase was immediately given, and the runaway was traced as far as the Duck Ponds (Lara), where the clue was lost, and nothing more had been heard of the escaped prisoner up to a late hour last evening.
The reason of his escape would seem to be that another charge
of horse-stealing is hanging over M’Henry’s head, and he probably heard of this, for it is not likely that for the sake of two or three
months he hnd still to serve that he would expose himsslf to a further sentence for attempting to escape.
He is an old soldier, and up to th time of his conviction was the recipient of a pension for services rendered in the Crimean and Indian wars. His conviction for felony, however, had the effect of making him ineligible of receiving any further payments on
that account.

On This Day ……. 14th of August 1869

The Advertiser reports that a prisoner named John McHenry, who at the last sittings of the General Sessions was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment for stealing saddles, made his escape from the Geelong Gaol, in a manner which leads to the presumption that he received assistance from the outside. He was engaged, with other prisoners, in that portion of the building which is being converted into an industrial school. This portion, since the dividing wall was completed, has been open for the ingress and egress of workmen and others, and the prisoners engaged there were all under the surveillance of a warder, this being considered sufficient, as they were all short sentence men. From the same cause, probably, it appears they were not subjected to a very rigid watching, for McHenry succeeded in changing his prison clothes in the water-closet, and donning an ordinary suit, which must have been left there by some associates. He then eluded the eyes of the warders, and escaped from the neighborhood of the gaol, taking his way through the town, for some of the cabmen on the Market square Stand observed him hurrying through the streets with a handkerchief tied over his head. They know him, but supposed that he had served his sentence and was discharged, and it was only on learning different, an hour after that, information was given to the police. Chase was immediately given, and the runaway was traced as far as the Duck Ponds, where the clue was lost, and nothing more had been heard of the escaped prisoner up to a late hour last evening. The police, however, have forwarded the necessary information to all the police stations, and there is but a poor chance of the man getting clear away. The reason of the attempt would seem to be that another charge of horse stealing is hanging over McHenry’s head, and he probably heard of this, for it is not likely for the sake of two or three months he had still to serve that he would expose himself to a further sentence for attempting to escape. He is an old soldier, and up to the time of his conviction was the recipient of a pension for services rendered in the Crimean and Indian wars. His conviction for felony, however, had the effect of making him ineligible to receive any further payments on that account.

 

On This Day ……. 14th of August 1869

The Advertiser reports that a prisoner named John McHenry, who at the last sittings of the General Sessions was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment for stealing saddles, made his escape from the Geelong Gaol, in a manner which leads to the presumption that he received assistance from the outside. He was engaged, with other prisoners, in that portion of the building which is being converted into an industrial school. This portion, since the dividing wall was completed, has been open for the ingress and egress of workmen and others, and the prisoners engaged there were all under the surveillance of a warder, this being considered sufficient, as they were all short sentence men. From the same cause, probably, it appears they were not subjected to a very rigid watching, for McHenry succeeded in changing his prison clothes in the water-closet, and donning an ordinary suit, which must have been left there by some associates. He then eluded the eyes of the warders, and escaped from the neighborhood of the gaol, taking his way through the town, for some of the cabmen on the Market square Stand observed him hurrying through the streets with a handkerchief tied over his head. They know him, but supposed that he had served his sentence and was discharged, and it was only on learning different, an hour after that, information was given to the police. Chase was immediately given, and the runaway was traced as far as the Duck Ponds, where the clue was lost, and nothing more had been heard of the escaped prisoner up to a late hour last evening. The police, however, have forwarded the necessary information to all the police stations, and there is but a poor chance of the man getting clear away. The reason of the attempt would seem to be that another charge of horse stealing is hanging over McHenry’s head, and he probably heard of this, for it is not likely for the sake of two or three months he had still to serve that he would expose himself to a further sentence for attempting to escape. He is an old soldier, and up to the time of his conviction was the recipient of a pension for services rendered in the Crimean and Indian wars. His conviction for felony, however, had the effect of making him ineligible to receive any further payments on that account.