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On this day …….. 17th of December 1914

Two kangaroos and six wallabies presented to the Ballarat City Council by Mrs George Russell, were placed in the Gardens as the nucleus of a zoo. They were found dead on this day. An emu was placed in the same enclosure and was unaffected. The Council is offering £10 reward for the discovery of the destroyer. It is believed that a dog did the mischief, but a veterinary surgeon is of opinion that the damage was done by the emu.

 

On this day …….. 17th of January 1915

An old and familiar resident of Moonee Ponds, in the form of a pet emu, died on this day in 1915. For 32 years the bird, known as “Joe” prowled his enclosure in front of Coilsfield the home of Mr Alexander Smith. It was very popular with residents, who made gifts of food, which it seemed to appreciate. Joe might have lived a longer life if not for an unlucky chance. A young boy threw a bottle breaking the birds leg. Despite the service of a veterinary surgeon, “Joe” did not recover.

 

 

On this day …….. 28th of December 1937

While chasing an emu on horseback at Gol Gol, John Dempsey (54), of Buronga, near Mildura fell on his head and was killed instantly. His neck was broken by the fall. Dempsey was fencing when he saw the emu and he gave chase immediately. It is believed that he was thrown from the saddle when the horse stumbled.

On this day …….. 17th of December 1914

Two kangaroos and six wallabies presented to the Ballarat City Council by Mrs George Russell, were placed in the Gardens as the nucleus of a zoo. They were found dead on this day. An emu was placed in the same enclosure and was unaffected. The Council is offering £10 reward for the discovery of the destroyer. It is believed that a dog did the mischief, but a veterinary surgeon is of opinion that the damage was done by the emu.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 29th November 1948

Australian Prime minister Ben Chifley launches the first mass-produced Australian car – the Holden FX

“Made in Australia, For Australia”.

These are the words spoken by Australian Prime Minister Ben Chifley when he launched the Holden FX on 29 November 1948. The real name of the Holden FX is 48/215. ’48 was the year it started production, and 215 indicated a Standard Sedan. The name “FX” originated as an unofficial designation within Holden after 1953, and was a reference to the updated suspension of that year. The Holden company began as ‘J.A. Holden & Co’, a saddlery business in 1856, and moved into car production in 1908. By 1926, Holden had an assembly plant in each of Australia’s mainland states, but due to the repercussions of the great Depression, production fell dramatically, from 34,000 units annually in 1930 to just 1,651 units in 1931. In that year, it became a subsidiary of the US-based General Motors (GM). Post-World War II Australia was a time when only one in eight people owned an automobile, and many of these were American styled cars. Prior to the close of World War II, the Australian Government put into place initiatives to encourage an Australian automotive industry. Both GM and Ford responded to the government, making proposals for the production of the first Australian designed car. Although Ford’s outline was preferred by the government, the Holden proposal required less financial assistance. Holden’s managing director, Laurence Hartnett, wished to develop a local design, but GM wanted an American design. Compromises were made, and the final design was based on a previously rejected post-war proposed Chevrolet. Thus, in 1948, the Holden was launched – the first mass-produced Australian car. Although the automobile’s official designation was the 48/215, it was marketed as the “Holden”. This was to honour Sir Edward Holden, the company’s first chairman and grandson of J.A. Holden, who established the original Holden saddlery. Other names that were considered included the ‘Austral’, ‘Woomerah’, ‘Boomerang’, ‘Melba’, ‘GeM’, ‘Emu’ and even the ‘Canbra’, a name derived from Australia’s capital city. The original retail price was AU£760.

On this day …….. 17th of January 1915

An old and familiar resident of Moonee Ponds, in the form of a pet emu, died on this day in 1915. For 32 years the bird, known as “Joe” prowled his enclosure in front of Coilsfield the home of Mr Alexander Smith. It was very popular with residents, who made gifts of food, which it seemed to appreciate. Joe might have lived a longer life if not for an unlucky chance. A young boy threw a bottle breaking the birds leg. Despite the service of a veterinary surgeon, “Joe” did not recover.

 

 

On this day …….. 28th of December 1937

While chasing an emu on horseback at Gol Gol, John Dempsey (54), of Buronga, near Mildura fell on his head and was killed instantly. His neck was broken by the fall. Dempsey was fencing when he saw the emu and he gave chase immediately. It is believed that he was thrown from the saddle when the horse stumbled.

On this day …….. 17th of December 1914

1947408_223477924650010_13514632_nTwo kangaroos and six wallabies presented to the Ballarat City Council by Mrs George Russell, were placed in the Gardens as the nucleus of a zoo. They were found dead on this day. An emu was placed in the same enclosure and was unaffected. The Council is offering £10 reward for the discovery of the destroyer. It is believed that a dog did the mischief, but a veterinary surgeon is of opinion that the damage was done by the emu.