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April 23rd, 1894

A reduction In the staff at the Geelong Gaol has been effected through the adoption by the Penal department of new
arrangements in regard to the disposal of female prisoners of the vagrant class, for whom special accommodation has been provided at Pentridge.

All the enfeebled women will be transferred to the Coburg penitentiary, only female prisoners of vigorous type being retained at the local gaol in order to do the laundry work furnished for then by the military authorities at Queenscliff. Hitherto between 60 and 70 women have been quartered at the local gaol, but the accomodations in the female division will be limited to that required far 30 inmates.

This alteration of the prison arrangements will enable Mr Cody to make provision for the reception of an additional number of male prisoners, chiefly of the invalid class, for whom relaxed discipline is necessary.

The female division will in future be under the control of Mrs Purbrick, who succeeds Miss Fleming, the latter having now transferred to the position of sub-matron at Pentridge while Miss Kilmartin, another of the female warders at the local gaol has received orders to proceed to the Melbourne Gaol. She will leave with a number of the female prisoners under her charge at the end of the week.  Miss Fleming, who has been in charge of the female arrangements at the local gaol for several years past, has been more than a quarter of a century in the service, but her promotion to the position of sub matron only carries with it increased responsibility without a corresponding
advance of remuneration.

The average number of prisoners in the men’s division will in future be about 170, and they will be under the control of nine warders, the proportion being much less than that in other gaols throughout the colony.  If the suggestion by the governor was carried out for the construction of radiating yards for the exercise of a number of separate treatment prisoners under the supervision of one warder, instead of the three posted in the turrets as at present the services of the staff could be utilised to much better advantage.

 

On This Day ……. 29th April 1894

On this day in 1894, all the female prisoners from the Geelong were transferred to Pentridge prison. There was a reduction in the staff at the Geelong Gaol from the effected through the option by the Penal department of new arrangements in regard to the disposal of female prisoners of the vagrant class, for whom special accommodation has been provided at Pentridge.

 

On This Day ……. 1st April 1854

On the 1st April 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.

 

On This Day – 10th March 1854

The Geelong gaol has been set apart for female prisoners, Governor Charles Brodie stated there is no means of separating the sane from the insane prisoners, for the want of accommodation. If I was to separate them, i.e., the sane from the insane, I should place at present twenty-seven women and children in the largest ward, which is 16 x 16. There are five solitary cells, which are occupied by male lunatics, and also used for punishment. These I must keep for the males and refractory prisoners, for if they were otherwise used, I could keep no subordination. The present system is quite subversive of prison discipline.

 

 

On This Day – 8th March 1907

Four prisoners, of the usual vagrant and feeble class, were received at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1907 from Pentridge, and the police escort took back two female prisoners to Coburg. Since the Penal authorities transferred the matron from the gaol, it has been necessary to engage an outside woman to attend to female prisoners until it is convenient to transfer them to Melbourne.

 

 

On This Day – 1st March 1854

On the 1st March 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.

 

 

On This Day ……. 29th April 1894

On this day in 1894, all the female prisoners from the Geelong were transferred to Pentridge prison. There was a reduction in the staff at the Geelong Gaol from the effected through the option by the Penal department of new arrangements in regard to the disposal of female prisoners of the vagrant class, for whom special accommodation has been provided at Pentridge.

 

On This Day ……. 1st April 1854

On the 1st April 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.

 

On This Day – 10th March 1854

The Geelong gaol has been set apart for female prisoners, Governor Charles Brodie stated there is no means of separating the sane from the insane prisoners, for the want of accommodation. If I was to separate them, i.e., the sane from the insane, I should place at present twenty-seven women and children in the largest ward, which is 16 x 16. There are five solitary cells, which are occupied by male lunatics, and also used for punishment. These I must keep for the males and refractory prisoners, for if they were otherwise used, I could keep no subordination. The present system is quite subversive of prison discipline.

 

 

On This Day – 8th March 1907

Four prisoners, of the usual vagrant and feeble class, were received at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1907 from Pentridge, and the police escort took back two female prisoners to Coburg. Since the Penal authorities transferred the matron from the gaol, it has been necessary to engage an outside woman to attend to female prisoners until it is convenient to transfer them to Melbourne.

 

 

On This Day – 1st March 1854

On the 1st March 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.