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ON THIS DAY – June 6, 1931

GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER 

In the Criminal Court to-day George Arnold Turner, (33), labourer, was charged with having murdered Edward Vincent Sheehan on June 6 at Collingwood. The Crown alleged that during a struggle Sheehan fell to the footpath, and Turner went down on top of him. Turner held Sheehan down by the throat for about a quarter of an hour. The Crown alleged also that Sheehan’s death had been brought about by pressure on the nose and throat. Turner stated that he had acted In self-defence. He was found guilty of manslaughter, and remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY – April 21, 1933

MELBOURNE

After inquiring into the death of Ivor Charles Waite, wharf labourer, who died of a fractured skull after a fight in Little Bourke-street on April 21. the Acting City Coroner, Mr O’Callaghan. P.M.. found that death was due to injuries inflicted by Alfred Monar, labourer. Monar was committed for trial on a charge of manslaughter.

 

ON THIS DAY – November 10, 1910

George James Keliand, labourer, was yesterday acquitted on a charge of the manslaughter of Henry John Morris, labourer, of Carlton, who died on November 10, after he and the accused had fought.  The accused stated that the deceased picked a quarrel with him, and forced him to fight. When the fight was over deceased said to the accused ” I’ll kill you”

 

 

 

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY – November 7, 1931

Charged with having murdered Edward O’Connor (30), of little Bourke street, City, George Mitchell (42), labourer, of Carlton, appeared at the City Court yesterday. When O’Connor was knocked down in a fight in Little Bourke-street on November 7, he received injuries from which he died in the Melbourne Hospital the following day.  The police prosecutor (Sergeant Ripper) told the bench that Mitchell was arrested on Friday. It was alleged that he was fighting with O’Connor. Mitchell was remanded to November 23, pending the result of the inquest.

 

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 23rd September 1926

Inquiries which resulted in his death were received by a Chinese in a fight with another Chinese in Marion street, Fitzroy, on the morning of September 23. The meat choppers and two knives, as well as a piece of lead piping and a large and heavy stick, were used in the struggle and severe injuries were received by both men., At the end of an inquest the Coroner, Mr D. Berriman, P.M., found Chung Wah Lee, 56 years, a cabinetmaker, of Marion street, Fitzroy, guilty of murder. Lillian Matthews, who described herself as a domestic servant, said, “I lived with Low Jack in a house in Marion street, Fitzroy. I was seated beside the window in my front room at 11:30am on September 23rd, the day on which the fight occurred. Chung Wah Lee was seated with Florrie Jones on the door, step of a house opposite. A man passed and spoke to someone at the door. I then heard Chung Wah Lee say excitedly, ‘you think you are a Chinese king.’ Low Jack made some reply. Chung Wah Lee rushed to my house and broke in the two panels of the front door and smashed the windows. Later Low Jack staggered into the house he was covered in blood and said that he, was dying. He had been stabbed in the chest and his eye was horribly, mutilated. I ran for the police, leaving him in the front room. When I returned I saw him collapse on the front door step. I had not seen the fight but I saw Chung Wah Lee with a chopper and a stick in his hand. Low Jack had a large knife, a large chopper and a tomahawk. When the police arrived Chung Wah Lee wanted to fight Jack again and said. ‘Come I will finish now.”

To the Coroner witness said: Low Jack went to Chung Wah Lee’s house after the windows and door’s had been smashed and made him come out and fight. I could not say whether there had been trouble over Florrie Jones, but sometime before she had broken a window at my house and had been made to pay for it and there had been ill-feeling. The accused said: “I fought with him with his own knife.” The Coroner found that Low Jack’s death had resulted from in injuries inflicted by Chung Wah Lee, and committed him for trial. Senior Detective Jones objected to admitting Chung Wah Lee to bail; but he was bail on two securities of £500 each.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 31st August 1903

The charge of murder preferred by the police against Henry Stevens, in connection with the death of Elizabeth Johnstone, at Ballarat on August 31, has been withdrawn.

The charge of murder preferred by the police against Henry Stevens, a collector of marine stores in connection with the death of Elizabeth Johnstone, at Steinfeld street, on August 31, was withdrawn when the accused appeared at the city court this morning. Stevens had been arrested principally on a statement made by Mrs.Croft, a neighbour of the deceased. She said that between 6 and 7 o’clock on the evening of the day mentioned a man, whom she believed to be Stevens, quarrelled with Johnstone, when threats were made and a noise as of a fight, ensued. When the case was called on to-day, Superintendent Young stated that inquiries made by the police had satisfied them that Stevens was not in any way responsible for the woman’s death. The accused was then discharged.

Subsequently the inquest into Johnstone’s death was resumed, before Mr. W. Dickson, P.M., and a jury of seven. Several witnesses gave evidence, but nothing fresh was adduced. A further adjournment was then made till Tuesday.

ON THIS DAY – June 6, 1931

GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER 

In the Criminal Court to-day George Arnold Turner, (33), labourer, was charged with having murdered Edward Vincent Sheehan on June 6 at Collingwood. The Crown alleged that during a struggle Sheehan fell to the footpath, and Turner went down on top of him. Turner held Sheehan down by the throat for about a quarter of an hour. The Crown alleged also that Sheehan’s death had been brought about by pressure on the nose and throat. Turner stated that he had acted In self-defence. He was found guilty of manslaughter, and remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY – April 21, 1933

MELBOURNE

After inquiring into the death of Ivor Charles Waite, wharf labourer, who died of a fractured skull after a fight in Little Bourke-street on April 21. the Acting City Coroner, Mr O’Callaghan. P.M.. found that death was due to injuries inflicted by Alfred Monar, labourer. Monar was committed for trial on a charge of manslaughter.

 

On this day …….. 31st of January 1932

A story of a remarkable combat between a goanna and a wombat is related by eye-witnesses who were on a holidaying at Kangaroo Valley. The fight commenced on a hill side, and the goanna gradually worked the wombat to a hole in a creek at the bottom of the hill, where the fight was continued. The wombat gradually weakened, and, finally, the goanna held it in a tight grip under the water until it was drowned. The victor then retired to the bank, where it engaged in a satisfying meal from its quarry. The wombat was nearly full grown.

 

 

On this day …….. 7th of January 1814

The first recorded fight in Australia happened on this day on the 7th of January 1814, at Hyde Park, Sydney. When John Berringer defeated Charles Lifton. The bout lasted two hours, with over 58 rounds. One of the conditions of the contest was that the me had to run half a mile (800m) before the fight began.

 

On This Day – January 2, 1951

The battered body of Kelham Malcolm Young, 50, was found outside a hut at Camp Pell early to-day. Young lived at the camp till a few months ago. Police are searching for a man who they think, attacked Young when he went to a hut at the camp. A fight between the two men is believed to have followed a refusal by Young to leave the camp. Police took possession of, a heavy piece of timber with which they think Young was battered to death. They are also working on the theory that a pistol was used to scare Young away. Camp residents were awakened by a shot about 5 a.m., and later Young’s body was found near the hut. A preliminary examination of the body failed to show any trace of a bullet wound.

ON THIS DAY – November 10, 1910

George James Keliand, labourer, was yesterday acquitted on a charge of the manslaughter of Henry John Morris, labourer, of Carlton, who died on November 10, after he and the accused had fought.  The accused stated that the deceased picked a quarrel with him, and forced him to fight. When the fight was over deceased said to the accused ” I’ll kill you”