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ON THIS DAY – July 17, 1946

TAILOR CHARGED WITH MURDER

The Coroner (Mr Marwick) . at the inquest today into the death oF Philip Elmore Johnson, 65, labourer, near Mornington on July 12 committed Trevor McKenzie, tailor, of Melbourne, for trial on a charge of murder. Johnson’s body was found under a sheet of iron near a hut on July 17. Detective J. Heath of Fitzroy, said that McKenzie telephoned him on July 17 and said: “I have murdered a man. It is awful.” Later at the Fitzroy police station he said that McKenzie told him that the murdered man was a man with whom he had been living at Hastings.

ARGUMENT ABOUT FOOD

Detective C. H. Petty said that McKenzie made a statement to the police in which he said: “Johnson lived on next to nothing and when I ordered more food he growled. He would not let me listen to anything humorous on the wireless. On July 17 we had an argument about food. He went crook on me for sitting in front of the fire. He went outside and I got a gun and put two cartridges in it. I saw him come around a tree. I aimed and must have pulled the two triggers at the same time. I got an axe but do not remember whacking him with it.”

ON THIS DAY – July 17, 1946

TAILOR CHARGED WITH MURDER

The Coroner (Mr Marwick) . at the inquest today into the death oF Philip Elmore Johnson, 65, labourer, near Mornington on July 12 committed Trevor McKenzie, tailor, of Melbourne, for trial on a charge of murder. Johnson’s body was found under a sheet of iron near a hut on July 17. Detective J. Heath of Fitzroy, said that McKenzie telephoned him on July 17 and said: “I have murdered a man. It is awful.” Later at the Fitzroy police station he said that McKenzie told him that the murdered man was a man with whom he had been living at Hastings.

ARGUMENT ABOUT FOOD

Detective C. H. Petty said that McKenzie made a statement to the police in which he said: “Johnson lived on next to nothing and when I ordered more food he growled. He would not let me listen to anything humorous on the wireless. On July 17 we had an argument about food. He went crook on me for sitting in front of the fire. He went outside and I got a gun and put two cartridges in it. I saw him come around a tree. I aimed and must have pulled the two triggers at the same time. I got an axe but do not remember whacking him with it.”

On this day …….. 31st of December 1790

The First Fleet, containing the officers and convicts who would first settle Australia, arrived in Botany Bay on the 18th of January 1788. The colony’s Governor, Captain Arthur Phillip, immediately determined that there was insufficient fresh water, an absence of usable timber, poor quality soil and no safe harbour at Botany Bay. Thus the fleet was moved to Port Jackson, arriving on the 26th of January 1788. The penal colony of New South Wales struggled, but managed to survive largely through the efforts of Governor Phillip. He was a practical man who had suggested that convicts with experience in farming, building and crafts be included in the First Fleet, but his proposal was rejected. Phillip faced many obstacles in his attempts to establish the new colony. The convicts were not skilled in farming, and unwilling to work hard in the intense heat and humidity of Australia. British farming methods, seeds and implements were unsuitable for use in the different climate and soil, and the colony faced near-starvation in its first two years. On this day in 1790, twenty-five bushels of barley were successfully harvested. This went a long way towards alleviating food shortages. The colony finally succeeded in developing a solid foundation, agriculturally and economically, thanks to the perseverance of Captain Arthur Phillip.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 17, 1946

TAILOR CHARGED WITH MURDER

The Coroner (Mr Marwick) . at the inquest today into the death oF Philip Elmore Johnson, 65, labourer, near Mornington on July 12 committed Trevor McKenzie, tailor, of Melbourne, for trial on a charge of murder. Johnson’s body was found under a sheet of iron near a hut on July 17. Detective J. Heath of Fitzroy, said that McKenzie telephoned him on July 17 and said: “I have murdered a man. It is awful.” Later at the Fitzroy police station he said that McKenzie told him that the murdered man was a man with whom he had been living at Hastings.

ARGUMENT ABOUT FOOD

Detective C. H. Petty said that McKenzie made a statement to the police in which he said: “Johnson lived on next to nothing and when I ordered more food he growled. He would not let me listen to anything humorous on the wireless. On July 17 we had an argument about food. He went crook on me for sitting in front of the fire. He went outside and I got a gun and put two cartridges in it. I saw him come around a tree. I aimed and must have pulled the two triggers at the same time. I got an axe but do not remember whacking him with it.”

On this day …….. 31st of December 1790

The First Fleet, containing the officers and convicts who would first settle Australia, arrived in Botany Bay on the 18th of January 1788. The colony’s Governor, Captain Arthur Phillip, immediately determined that there was insufficient fresh water, an absence of usable timber, poor quality soil and no safe harbour at Botany Bay. Thus the fleet was moved to Port Jackson, arriving on the 26th of January 1788. The penal colony of New South Wales struggled, but managed to survive largely through the efforts of Governor Phillip. He was a practical man who had suggested that convicts with experience in farming, building and crafts be included in the First Fleet, but his proposal was rejected. Phillip faced many obstacles in his attempts to establish the new colony. The convicts were not skilled in farming, and unwilling to work hard in the intense heat and humidity of Australia. British farming methods, seeds and implements were unsuitable for use in the different climate and soil, and the colony faced near-starvation in its first two years. On this day in 1790, twenty-five bushels of barley were successfully harvested. This went a long way towards alleviating food shortages. The colony finally succeeded in developing a solid foundation, agriculturally and economically, thanks to the perseverance of Captain Arthur Phillip.