Posts

ON THIS DAY – July 30, 1993

A body found in Melbourne’s outer south-east on Friday night was that of the missing Frankston school girl Natalie Jayne Russell, 17, police confirmed yesterday.

Detective Chief Inspector Peter Halloran, of the Homicide Squad, said there were similarities between the killing and the stabbing murders of two women in the Frankston area in the last seven weeks. “Examinations show that she died as a result of stab wounds or knife wounds to the upper body,” Inspector Halloran said. “At this early stage we are open-minded about it but there are similarities between this and the two recent murders,” he said. Debbie Fream, a 22-year-old mother, was found slain in the area three weeks ago, and the body of an 18-year-old student, Elizabeth Anne-Marie Stevens, was discovered in June. Both died as a result of stab wounds.Inspector Halloran said there were no signs of sexual assault in any of the three killings. Natalie Russell’s body was found by two State Emergency Service workers at about 11pm on Friday night in a heavily wooded area. She was lying face down, in thick scrub about 3m from a bike track. About 150 detectives door-knocked almost 5000 houses in the Frankston area yesterday, as part of Operation Pulsar, in relation to the murder of Debbie Fream and the other crimes.

The fastest beer drinker in Australia was a tittle won by a carpenter, Max van Dennesse of Frankston in Victoria who guzzled six cans in 1 min 2.34 sec, beating an earlier record by 28 seconds.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 8, 1993

Deborah Fream, 22, had given birth to her first child 10 days earlier. With a friend over for dinner, Debbie popped down to the local store to purchase a litre of milk. While she was in the store, her killer crept into the back seat of her car.  Deborah was taken to Taylor’s Road and her throat was slashed savagely.  Her body was found in a cow pasture a few kilometers away. She had been stabbed 24 times, but had not been sexually assaulted.

Paul Denyer became known as the “Frankston Killer” as his crimes occurred in Frankston and neighbouring suburbs.

On This Day ……. 1st June 1927

Clive Frankston, aged 36 years, was charged on the 1st of the June 1926, with larceny and sentenced to two years in Pentradge. On the 28th April 1927, the Penal Authorities at Pentridge decided to transfer Frankston and another prisoner, Henry Tacke, to the Geelong Gaol. The two prisoners were escorted by Senior Constable Matthews and Constable Springfield, took the two prisoners from Pentridge Gaol to the Flinders street station in a prison van. Frankston was placed in a carriage on the Geelong train at No. 1 platform, and the two police officers returned to the van to carry Tacke, who was disabled by an injured leg, to the train. Upon reaching the carriage they found that’ Frankston was gone. Frankston seeing an opportunity to escaped from the carriage while the police escort was carring Tacke who was disabled to the police van out side the station. He dashed from the carriage and rushing through the ticket barrier and disappeared among the crowds in the street. On the 14th of May 1927, following up inquiries detectives raid a house in Napior street, Fitzroy owned by Frankstons wife. Inside Frankston was recaptured, he offered no resistance, he was so weak from illness that he could scarcely stand. He told the police that he was glad to get back to gaol and that he was suffering badly from consumption and that that he believed that the sea air at Geelong would kill him. Frankston received an extra 6 months to his sentence.

ON THIS DAY – October 31, 1928

 

Joseph Livingstone, aged 66 years, formerly an estate agent, was charged at the City Court to-day with having, at Frankston, on October 31, wilfully murdered Margaret Mary Fearon.  S.C. Elliott said he arrested Livingstone at Frankston on the morning of October 31. He asked for a remand until November 14, which was granted.  Margaret Mary Fearon, sister-in-law of Livingstone, was found dead at Frankston on the morning of October 31 with her throat cut. Livingstone was found in bed in the house with an injury to his throat. He appeared in Court to-day with his throat heavily bandaged.

 

 

On this day …….. 11th of October 1944

While on a train bound for Frankston, Victoria, on this day in 1944, a New South Wales Army Sergeant Hugh Cameron struck up a conversation with a female passenger. During the exchange he remarked that he knew no one in the state and found camp life lonely. Mrs S.A Wilson of Queen St, Mornington, Victoria befriended Cameron and invited him home. Chatting about their familes, Mrs Wilson found that Hugh Cameron was the son of a sister she had not heard of for 36 years and had presumed dead. Sergeant Hugh Cameron was attached to and army unit in the Mornington area and had no idea he had relatives there.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 30, 1993

A body found in Melbourne’s outer south-east on Friday night was that of the missing Frankston school girl Natalie Jayne Russell, 17, police confirmed yesterday.

Detective Chief Inspector Peter Halloran, of the Homicide Squad, said there were similarities between the killing and the stabbing murders of two women in the Frankston area in the last seven weeks. “Examinations show that she died as a result of stab wounds or knife wounds to the upper body,” Inspector Halloran said. “At this early stage we are open-minded about it but there are similarities between this and the two recent murders,” he said. Debbie Fream, a 22-year-old mother, was found slain in the area three weeks ago, and the body of an 18-year-old student, Elizabeth Anne-Marie Stevens, was discovered in June. Both died as a result of stab wounds.Inspector Halloran said there were no signs of sexual assault in any of the three killings. Natalie Russell’s body was found by two State Emergency Service workers at about 11pm on Friday night in a heavily wooded area. She was lying face down, in thick scrub about 3m from a bike track. About 150 detectives door-knocked almost 5000 houses in the Frankston area yesterday, as part of Operation Pulsar, in relation to the murder of Debbie Fream and the other crimes.

The fastest beer drinker in Australia was a tittle won by a carpenter, Max van Dennesse of Frankston in Victoria who guzzled six cans in 1 min 2.34 sec, beating an earlier record by 28 seconds.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 8, 1993

Deborah Fream, 22, had given birth to her first child 10 days earlier. With a friend over for dinner, Debbie popped down to the local store to purchase a litre of milk. While she was in the store, her killer crept into the back seat of her car.  Deborah was taken to Taylor’s Road and her throat was slashed savagely.  Her body was found in a cow pasture a few kilometers away. She had been stabbed 24 times, but had not been sexually assaulted.

Paul Denyer became known as the “Frankston Killer” as his crimes occurred in Frankston and neighbouring suburbs.

On This Day ……. 1st June 1927

Clive Frankston, aged 36 years, was charged on the 1st of the June 1926, with larceny and sentenced to two years in Pentradge. On the 28th April 1927, the Penal Authorities at Pentridge decided to transfer Frankston and another prisoner, Henry Tacke, to the Geelong Gaol. The two prisoners were escorted by Senior Constable Matthews and Constable Springfield, took the two prisoners from Pentridge Gaol to the Flinders street station in a prison van. Frankston was placed in a carriage on the Geelong train at No. 1 platform, and the two police officers returned to the van to carry Tacke, who was disabled by an injured leg, to the train. Upon reaching the carriage they found that’ Frankston was gone. Frankston seeing an opportunity to escaped from the carriage while the police escort was carring Tacke who was disabled to the police van out side the station. He dashed from the carriage and rushing through the ticket barrier and disappeared among the crowds in the street. On the 14th of May 1927, following up inquiries detectives raid a house in Napior street, Fitzroy owned by Frankstons wife. Inside Frankston was recaptured, he offered no resistance, he was so weak from illness that he could scarcely stand. He told the police that he was glad to get back to gaol and that he was suffering badly from consumption and that that he believed that the sea air at Geelong would kill him. Frankston received an extra 6 months to his sentence.

ON THIS DAY – May 3, 1946

MURDER MYSTERY

In the city hotel room from which a man disappeared on May 3 was a book by Ellery Queen, a murder suicide mystery, which he had apparently been reading. A few days later clothing was found on the end of Frankston pier. The name of John Wilson was on an envelope in a coat pocket. Description of the missing man is: 5ft 8in, blue eyes, dark hair, sallow complexion. He is a diabetic, and may be suffering from loss of memory. Russell st police are seeking information.

On This Day ……. 27th April 1927

Clive Frankston, aged 36 years, was charged on the 1st of the June 1926, with larceny and sentenced to two years in Pentradge. On the 28th April 1927, the Penal Authorities at Pentridge decided to transfer Frankston and another prisoner, Henry Tacke, to the Geelong Gaol. The two prisoners were escorted by Senior Constable Matthews and Constable Springfield, took the two prisoners from Pentridge Gaol to the Flinders street station in a prison van. Frankston was placed in a carriage on the Geelong train at No. 1 platform, and the two police officers returned to the van to carry Tacke, who was disabled by an injured leg, to the train. Upon reaching the carriage they found that’ Frankston was gone. Frankston seeing an opportunity to escaped from the carriage while the police escort was carring Tacke who was disabled to the police van out side the station. He dashed from the carriage and rushing through the ticket barrier and disappeared among the crowds in the street. On the 14th of May 1927, following up inquiries detectives raid a house in Napior street, Fitzroy owned by Frankstons wife. Inside Frankston was recaptured, he offered no resistance, he was so weak from illness that he could scarcely stand. He told the police that he was glad to get back to gaol and that he was suffering badly from consumption and that that he believed that the sea air at Geelong would kill him. Frankston received an extra 6 months to his sentence.