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Ernst Schneider, 83, who died at Dubbo, NSW,  in 1943, completed some years ago all arrangements for his funeral.

He selected the casket, and even engraved .the nameplate for his own coffin. The undertaker had only to insert the date of his death.

“He was more concerned with the hereafter than this world,” said a friend who knew him well.⁣

 

The Death of Nelly Horrigan

February 10, 1870

“A disgraceful scene occurred on Friday last, in a brothel near Little Bourke street up on the occassion of a wake taking place.

It appears that a woman of the town, named Nelly Horrigan, was found dead in her bed on Friday morning by the man with whom she had been cohabitating, and it was decided by her companions to “wake” her in proper style.

Accordingly, at night the coffin containing the body was placed on trestles in the middle of the room, plenty of spirits were provided and placed on a table at the head, with pipes and tobacco in abundance at the foot.  The room was lit with candles, till everything was as light as day, and an old woman was seated at the foot of the coffin kept up an unearthly yell throughout the evening.  Towards ten o’clock, about sixty thieves and prostitutes of the lowest class assembled in the room, and commenced drinking and smoking, which finally ended in a regular melee, in which the coffin was upset, and black eyes and broken noses were freely distributed; and it was not until some of the sober neighbours interfered that the orgie was put an end to.

The funeral took place on Sunday, and it was evident from the appearance of those following the hearse, that the fight had been of a very sanguinary character, for there was hardly one of the mourners that had not either a black eye or a bandaged head.”

On This Day ……. 31st May 1943

Ernst Schneider, 83, who died at Dubbo, NSW, completed some years ago all arrangements for his funeral. He selected the casket, and even engraved the nameplate for his own coffin. The undertaker had only to insert the date of his death. “He was more concerned with the hereafter than this world,” said a friend who knew him well.

ON THIS DAY…… 1st November 2012

Toilet people are dying to use

The town of Millaa Millaa, in Queensland, Australia, came up with a killer idea for national coverage and tourist attraction at their town cemetery. A new toilet was needed at the graveyard and the council was quoted more than $80,000. Not to be killed in their tracks the local Chamber of Commerce decided to just build one themselves. Undertaking the gravely task their build a coffin shape toilet “crap crypt”. Problem is, now that this eternal restroom has been built, some townsfolk are dying of embarrassment. “You have to be careful, not everyone is going to have our macabre sense of humour,” Chamber president Pat Reynolds told the Herald Sun newspaper. “But we did it with good intentions. It’s for firstly, the cemetery, and secondly, maybe a few more people will notice Millaa Millaa now.” The builders made sure not to do a crappy job on the toilet, providing a septic system, solid cement foundation, and strong walls, one of which bears a cross and the letters RIP, according to the Courier-Mail newspaper. Not everyone likes the idea. Brian Norton was dead set against the tombstone toilet and wrote a letter to officials expressing his grave concerns. “Imagine if they had a funeral there,” he said. “I don’t think it’s going to go over very well, especially if people are there from out of town. They’ll think, ‘What sort of place is this?'”

On This Day – September 30, 1931

The Burwood police are investigating a story told them by an undertaker concerning elaborate arrangements made with him for a funeral on Tuesday.

A woman who is believed to have no family, died in a private hospital at Burwood, and a man, whom the undertaker understood to be her husband, ordered an expensive funeral. An elaborate polished oak coffin, costing £40, was ordered, also several mourning coaches, and wreath costing £2 2s.

Yesterday the undertaker, the mourners, and the clergyman waited for the “husband” of the dead woman, but he did not arrive. The undertaker, refusing to allow the funeral to be carried out, cancelled the arrangements until sufficient money to pay expenses was forthcoming. The mourners commandeered the coaches , and searched Canterbury in vain for the missing man.

The police have learned that the man’s employer was with him at 2 p.m. In a hotel which they left in the employer’s car to go to the funeral chambers. On the way the “widower” asked his employer to stop and allow him to enter a house to get money. There the employer waited for some time; and then made a search of the house, but found no trace of the man.

So far the undertaker, the private hospital, and the Macquarie Street specialist who attended the woman are still unpaid and the “widowed husband” is missing.

The woman will probably be given a paupers funeral.

On This Day – September 23, 1908

Albert Cartledge, who is charged with having murdered his wife at Ballarat East on Saturday night, appeared in the Town Court this morning, before Messrs. A. J. Pittard, T. Harvey, and I. Pearce, J.P.s.  Cartledge was neatly dressed, and he appeared to acutely feel his position. Sergeant Kelly represented the police, and formally read over the charge. Cartledge made no response and when the sergeant asked that a remand be granted until next Thursday the prisoner merely nodded his head.  The remand was granted and Cartledge was then removed to the gaol. He made no further allusion to the tragedy.

The funeral of Mrs. Cartledge took place this afternoon. A brief service was conducted by the Rev. J. West Law at the residence of Cartledge’s father, where the body had been removed late on the previous night. The interment was made in the New Cemetery at Ballarat North, and there were a large number of spectators at the funeral.

On this day …….. 4th September 1922

The ‘people’s poet’, Henry Lawson, was given a State Funeral at St Andrew’s Cathedral, Sydney, on 4 September, 1922. Thousands watched the funeral leave for Waverley Cemetery. As the coffin was born from the Cathedral, an incident marking the popularity of the deceased attracted the attention of many members of the congregation. A typical countryman, tall, sinewy, and brown, stood like a gaunt statue as the coffin was borne towards the northern door. For a moment he wavered, and then burst into tears that flowed down his rugged cheeks – ‘the grief that must have way’.

 

On This Day ……. 31st May 1943

Ernst Schneider, 83, who died at Dubbo, NSW, completed some years ago all arrangements for his funeral. He selected the casket, and even engraved the nameplate for his own coffin. The undertaker had only to insert the date of his death. “He was more concerned with the hereafter than this world,” said a friend who knew him well.

On this day …….. 28th of December 1853

On the 28th of December, 1853, what appeared to be the body of a man was noticed floating near an overseas boat, the Royal Shepherdess, at Port Adelaide. Most of those who saw it thought that some unfortunate man had met death by drowning.

However, on being removed from the water the body proved to be a dummy. A jury of ‘highly respectable men’ was assembled with alacrity beyond all precedent and, the foreman having expressed to the coroner a desire for a post mortem examination, the aid of a surgeon was obtained with equal promptitude. The examination went to show, very convincingly, ‘that the deceased met his death from natural causes, and not otherwise.’ A large quantity of mud was said to have been found in the stomach, also, that on removing the scalp the cranium was found to be empty.

The effigy was then paraded through the streets of Port Adelaide, attended by 22 ‘priests in full canonicals’ and followed by several hundred towns people. After this, with all the solemnity of a funeral, the body was removed by boat to one of the ships and hung to the fore yardarm for some time. It was then cut adrift and allowed to float with the tide until, with a cleverly assumed sympathy for the memory of the deceased, several of the mourners brought it ashore and placed it in a coffin. Bearers carried It to where a shallow grave had been prepared. A burial service was read and, with much well-simulated grief, the remains were duly interred. Then all the chips in the port dipped their ensigns, and the ‘sorrowing’ crowd dispersed.

The idea of the strange performance originated in the strong feeling of resentment excited by the Collector of Customs who, when speaking in the Legislative Council, had designated Port Adelaide ‘a mud hole.’

ON THIS DAY…… 1st November 2012

Toilet people are dying to use

The town of Millaa Millaa, in Queensland, Australia, came up with a killer idea for national coverage and tourist attraction at their town cemetery. A new toilet was needed at the graveyard and the council was quoted more than $80,000. Not to be killed in their tracks the local Chamber of Commerce decided to just build one themselves. Undertaking the gravely task their build a coffin shape toilet “crap crypt”. Problem is, now that this eternal restroom has been built, some townsfolk are dying of embarrassment. “You have to be careful, not everyone is going to have our macabre sense of humour,” Chamber president Pat Reynolds told the Herald Sun newspaper. “But we did it with good intentions. It’s for firstly, the cemetery, and secondly, maybe a few more people will notice Millaa Millaa now.” The builders made sure not to do a crappy job on the toilet, providing a septic system, solid cement foundation, and strong walls, one of which bears a cross and the letters RIP, according to the Courier-Mail newspaper. Not everyone likes the idea. Brian Norton was dead set against the tombstone toilet and wrote a letter to officials expressing his grave concerns. “Imagine if they had a funeral there,” he said. “I don’t think it’s going to go over very well, especially if people are there from out of town. They’ll think, ‘What sort of place is this?'”

On This Day – September 30, 1931

The Burwood police are investigating a story told them by an undertaker concerning elaborate arrangements made with him for a funeral on Tuesday.

A woman who is believed to have no family, died in a private hospital at Burwood, and a man, whom the undertaker understood to be her husband, ordered an expensive funeral. An elaborate polished oak coffin, costing £40, was ordered, also several mourning coaches, and wreath costing £2 2s.

Yesterday the undertaker, the mourners, and the clergyman waited for the “husband” of the dead woman, but he did not arrive. The undertaker, refusing to allow the funeral to be carried out, cancelled the arrangements until sufficient money to pay expenses was forthcoming. The mourners commandeered the coaches , and searched Canterbury in vain for the missing man.

The police have learned that the man’s employer was with him at 2 p.m. In a hotel which they left in the employer’s car to go to the funeral chambers. On the way the “widower” asked his employer to stop and allow him to enter a house to get money. There the employer waited for some time; and then made a search of the house, but found no trace of the man.

So far the undertaker, the private hospital, and the Macquarie Street specialist who attended the woman are still unpaid and the “widowed husband” is missing.

The woman will probably be given a paupers funeral.

On This Day – September 23, 1908

Albert Cartledge, who is charged with having murdered his wife at Ballarat East on Saturday night, appeared in the Town Court this morning, before Messrs. A. J. Pittard, T. Harvey, and I. Pearce, J.P.s.  Cartledge was neatly dressed, and he appeared to acutely feel his position. Sergeant Kelly represented the police, and formally read over the charge. Cartledge made no response and when the sergeant asked that a remand be granted until next Thursday the prisoner merely nodded his head.  The remand was granted and Cartledge was then removed to the gaol. He made no further allusion to the tragedy.

The funeral of Mrs. Cartledge took place this afternoon. A brief service was conducted by the Rev. J. West Law at the residence of Cartledge’s father, where the body had been removed late on the previous night. The interment was made in the New Cemetery at Ballarat North, and there were a large number of spectators at the funeral.