Posts

Convict Joseph Samuels was sentenced to death for burglary in Sydney in 1803. Whoever on the day of the execution 26th of September 1803, the rope broke 3 times. As Samuels was about to be executed the 4th time, the Governor stopped the proceedings on the grounds of divine intervention. Samuels left the gallows with his life and a sore neck.

 

On This Day – June 22, 1936

Edward Cornelius (29), mechanic, to-day walked to the gallows with a smile on his face to be hanged for the murder of Rev. Harold Laceby Cecil. When the sheriff asked him if he had anything to say he shook his head and said, “No; I am all right.”

He stood quite steady on the drop until the lever was pulled.

Archbishop Head visited the condemned man yesterday, and spoke with him for more than 10 minutes. Cornelius had breakfast of bacon and eggs, and spent three-quarters of an hour in the company of a chaplain.

ON THIS DAY – June 1, 1936

ARNOLD SODEMAN – PENTRIDGE GAOL

Arnold Karl Sodeman 39 was hanged in the Pentridge Gaol this morning for the murder of June Rushmer, aged 6½ years, at Leongatha, on December last. Asked by the Sheriff whether he had anything to say, Sodeman replied: “Nothing, sir.” He walked to the scaffold, apparently unmoved. His last words to the Governor of the Gaol last night were: “I am glad it is nearly over.” Sodeman confessed to the murders of three other girls during the last five years. He had not wanted a reprieve because of the fear that if he lived he may have committed more murders. Sodeman spent a good deal of yesterday playing draughts with Edward Cornelius, who is under sentence of death for the murder of the Rev. Cecil in Fitzroy in November of last year.

Convict Joseph Samuels was sentenced to death for burglary in Sydney in 1803. Whoever on the day of the execution 26th of September 1803, the rope broke 3 times. As Samuels was about to be executed the 4th time, the Governor stopped the proceedings on the grounds of divine intervention. Samuels left the gallows with his life and a sore neck.

 

On This Day – June 22, 1936

Edward Cornelius (29), mechanic, to-day walked to the gallows with a smile on his face to be hanged for the murder of Rev. Harold Laceby Cecil. When the sheriff asked him if he had anything to say he shook his head and said, “No; I am all right.”

He stood quite steady on the drop until the lever was pulled.

Archbishop Head visited the condemned man yesterday, and spoke with him for more than 10 minutes. Cornelius had breakfast of bacon and eggs, and spent three-quarters of an hour in the company of a chaplain.

ON THIS DAY – June 1, 1936

ARNOLD SODEMAN – PENTRIDGE GAOL

Arnold Karl Sodeman 39 was hanged in the Pentridge Gaol this morning for the murder of June Rushmer, aged 6½ years, at Leongatha, on December last. Asked by the Sheriff whether he had anything to say, Sodeman replied: “Nothing, sir.” He walked to the scaffold, apparently unmoved. His last words to the Governor of the Gaol last night were: “I am glad it is nearly over.” Sodeman confessed to the murders of three other girls during the last five years. He had not wanted a reprieve because of the fear that if he lived he may have committed more murders. Sodeman spent a good deal of yesterday playing draughts with Edward Cornelius, who is under sentence of death for the murder of the Rev. Cecil in Fitzroy in November of last year.

EXECUTION ON THIS DAY………….30th April 1847

EXECUTION TWO ABORIGINALS

The sad penalty of the law was carried into effect upon Ptolemy and Bobby, the two unfortunate Murray blacks, convicted as the principals in the lamentable murder of the late Mr. Andrew Beveridge, jun. As we stated in our last, ever since the announcement of their doom to them, the culprits evinced a keen sense of their situation—Ptolemy bore it with much strength of mind, but it was too much for Bobby. Day after day he pined away in his cell, and grew more nervous to the last moment. The attentions of Mr. Protector Thomas worked a considerable improvement in the minds of the ill-fated beings. They fully felt their fate, and began to entertain a dim idea of an all-seeing Providence. On the morning of their execution, both appeared to be extremely ill at ease, and the workings of their muscles evidently betrayed the inward operations of their feelings: Bobby especially seemed unmanned. At the usual hour, the fatal procession left the “condemned cells,” and advanced on its fatal journey to the tread-mill yard, where the gallows was erected. The prisoners were attended by Messrs. Thomas, French, and Lacey, the latter having acted as one of the interpreters on their trial, and when they arrived at the foot of the scaffold, they appeared to be much distressed. Both burst out crying, and could scarcely be restrained. Previous to the pinioning, Mr. Thomas read prayers, and as well as he could endeavoured to impress them with the nature of the awful proceedings. On ascending the ladder, Bobby was scarcely able to stand, and required the assistance of Mr. French. Ptolemy, though completely exhausted, possessed much more presence of mind than his companion. On mounting the platform, Bobby could not face the crowd congregated outside, and turned round, but Ptolemy stood, as if in the calmness of death awaiting the moment when he was to plunge into the abyss of eternity. The executioner was, however, busy at his work, the ropes were adjusted, the caps were drawn down, the bolt was pushed, and the drop fell. Ptolemy expired instanter, without a struggle, his neck being broken in the shock. Not so with Bobby, as when the drop fell, he endeavoured, as a last effort for life, to get his foot on a portion of the platform. This broke his fall, and almost turned him head over heels, in consequence of which his struggles were protracted and severe. After hanging the usual length of time, the bodies were cut down, coffined, and interred. A number of persons were present, including many aboriginals, and a majority of women. This is highly disgraceful, but there is no use in remonstrating, the female sex must have its way, despite public opinion, the press, or even the dictates of every principle consonant with humanity.

 

EXECUTED THIS DAY – April 27, 1891

 

On this day in 1891, the execution of Fatta Chand took place for murdering his Hindoo partner, Juggo Mull, near Healesville in November last, took place within the Melbourne gaol. The condemned man on finding he could not accomplish his purpose of cheating the gallows by starving himself, partook of food voluntarily. Mr Gilbert Smith, interpreter, states that when he saw Chand he was perfectly resigned to his fate, and said in his native tongue “I will go to the scaffold like a man and not like a woman.” There was an unusual number of spectators at the execution, including 30 policemen, private individuals and representatives of the press. Shortly before ten o’clock the sheriff demanded Fatta Chand’s body from the governor of the goal in the usual manner, and the condemned man, who looked lank and lean, on being bound, marched on to the scaffold with firm step. The governor of the gaol asked him if he had anything to say, whereupon he replied through an interpreter “No I have nothing more to say. I did not kill the man. I am not guilty. I am not guilty.” The cap was then drawn down, the rope adjusted and the bolt drawn, death being instantaneous. It was feared that Chand’s reduced weight would not have broken his neck. None of his countrymen were present at the carrying out of the sentence. Before Fatta Chand was taken to the gallows he told Mr Smith, intetpreter, that after death he would become a wanderer on earth. He requested that his parents be informed that he died from cholera, and that his body had been burned.

 

On this day ………… 27th February 1788

One of the first permanent structures erected in Australia was the gallows in Sydney Town. The first person to be executed was 17 year old James Barrett on this day in 1788, one month after settlement had been established. Barrett had stolen food because he was hungry, but he had been caught in the act. Justice was swift, he was charged, convicted and sentenced to hang on the same day.

 

 

Convict Joseph Samuels was sentenced to death for burglary in Sydney in 1803. Whoever on the day of the execution 26th of September 1803, the rope broke 3 times. As Samuels was about to be executed the 4th time, the Governor stopped the proceedings on the grounds of divine intervention. Samuels left the gallows with his life and a sore neck.

 

On This Day – June 22, 1936

Edward Cornelius (29), mechanic, to-day walked to the gallows with a smile on his face to be hanged for the murder of Rev. Harold Laceby Cecil. When the sheriff asked him if he had anything to say he shook his head and said, “No; I am all right.”

He stood quite steady on the drop until the lever was pulled.

Archbishop Head visited the condemned man yesterday, and spoke with him for more than 10 minutes. Cornelius had breakfast of bacon and eggs, and spent three-quarters of an hour in the company of a chaplain.

ON THIS DAY – June 1, 1936

ARNOLD SODEMAN – PENTRIDGE GAOL

Arnold Karl Sodeman 39 was hanged in the Pentridge Gaol this morning for the murder of June Rushmer, aged 6½ years, at Leongatha, on December last. Asked by the Sheriff whether he had anything to say, Sodeman replied: “Nothing, sir.” He walked to the scaffold, apparently unmoved. His last words to the Governor of the Gaol last night were: “I am glad it is nearly over.” Sodeman confessed to the murders of three other girls during the last five years. He had not wanted a reprieve because of the fear that if he lived he may have committed more murders. Sodeman spent a good deal of yesterday playing draughts with Edward Cornelius, who is under sentence of death for the murder of the Rev. Cecil in Fitzroy in November of last year.