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ON THIS DAY…… 17th October 1902

The Geelong Botanical Gardens was nearly the scene of another tragedy on this day in 1902. At about 5 o’clock, a married woman named Bridget Williams, aged 35 years, who arrived here from Broken Hill about 12 months earlier, was observed leading her two children into the enclosure. Her manner, however, was so peculiar that she was followed by Mr John Edwards, of Preston’s Hotel, who questioned her as to where she was going, and she replied in search of her children. A few minutes later Constable Gardiner arrived on the scene, and as he seized her a civilian took a sharpened razor from her pocket. The timely arrival of the constable was due to the fact that the demented woman had written to him, stating that she intended to kill her children and herself. She was arrested, and is now in the gaol hospital on remand, awaiting medical examination.

 

On This Day – 23rd March 1875

On this day in 1875, Mr Peter Dwyer, Governor of the Geelong gaol, was asked upon what terms the labour of prisoners can be obtained for working in the Geelong Botanical Gardens.

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 17th October 1902

The Geelong Botanical Gardens was nearly the scene of another tragedy on this day in 1902. At about 5 o’clock, a married woman named Bridget Williams, aged 35 years, who arrived here from Broken Hill about 12 months earlier, was observed leading her two children into the enclosure. Her manner, however, was so peculiar that she was followed by Mr John Edwards, of Preston’s Hotel, who questioned her as to where she was going, and she replied in search of her children. A few minutes later Constable Gardiner arrived on the scene, and as he seized her a civilian took a sharpened razor from her pocket. The timely arrival of the constable was due to the fact that the demented woman had written to him, stating that she intended to kill her children and herself. She was arrested, and is now in the gaol hospital on remand, awaiting medical examination.

 

On This Day – 23rd March 1875

On this day in 1875, Mr Peter Dwyer, Governor of the Geelong gaol, was asked upon what terms the labour of prisoners can be obtained for working in the Geelong Botanical Gardens.