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Sarah Mullins, alias White, convicted of the manslaughter of William Kelly, was next brought up for sentence.

Mullins had stabbed Kelly in the thigh with a butchers knife after Kelly threw a stool at her when she refused to stop drinking beer.

His Honor said she had had a very narrow escape from the sentence of death, as it was quite open to the jury upon the evidence to have returned a verdict of guilty on the capital charge of murder.  He knew she was drunk, but that was no excuse at all, for he had often laid it down, that a prisoner who committed an offence whilst drunk must bear the full responsibility.

The jury had convicted her of manslaughter, but a recent act prevented him from passing a sentence of transportation, otherwise he should have felt it his duty to have done so. Various punishments had been provided in lieu of transportation, and his Honor thought he should be dealing leniently with the prisoner in sentencing her to the least period of imprisonment substituted for seven years transportation, which was two years. That sentence he accordingly passed.⁣

 

Donald Maxfield was reported missing from Colac on the 13th of May, 1953. On the 1st of August 1953, the torso of a man was pulled from the Barwon River. Divers would eventually find the rest of Maxfield’s body, which had been dismembered and placed in kerosene tins and sunk in the Barwon River. ⁣

It was believed the Maxfield was attacked and bashed in a garage in Colac by two men. The men had placed the unconscious body of Maxfield in the boot of a car and had driven to Geelong. Maxfield regained consciousness and was again bashed to death on the banks of the Barwon. It was reported that this was a payback as it was believed that Maxfield had been a police informant against one of the men.⁣

The two men would later be arrested and information from them would lead to finding the rest of Maxfields body by divers recovering the torso after a 5 hour search of the river. The torso had been covered in an oat sack, wrapped in wire and weighed down with stone weights so that it was roughly 100lbs. The head and hands were later discovered in kerosene tins in the river. ⁣

Both men were charged with murder and sentenced to life imprisonment and 20 years respectively.⁣

“Attack on the Gold Escort” is a 1911 Australian silent film.  Directed by Pathe Frere, and shot on location in Geelong.  The film was released on the 19th of June 1911.  Sadly all known copies of the film no longer exists.

The film was described as “an Exciting and Thrilling Reproduction of Australian Early Days. A vivid portrayal of bush adventure around Geelong and filmed “at the exact spot where the incident happened.”

The Kapunda Herald stated the film “portrayed the terrors of the road, during the time when bushranging was rife, in a vivid and realistic manner.”

The film starts at the Bank of Australasia at 2 Malone St, Geelong, before the gold escort is pursued down the Fyansford Hill by the bushrangers. 

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au

September 7, 1869

Yesterday a prisoner named M’Henry, who at the last sittings of the General Sessions was sentenced to four months’ imprisonment
for stealing saddles, made his escape from the Geelong Gaol in a manner which leads to the presumption that he received assistance from outside.
M’Henry succeeded in changing his prison clothes in the water closet, and dolling an ordinary suit, which must have been left
there by some associates. He then eluded the eyes of the warders, and escaped from the neighborhood of the gaol, taking his way
through the town, for some of the cabmen on the Market Square stand, observed him hurrying through the streets, with a handkerchief tied over his head. They knew him, but supposed that he had served his sentence, and was discharged, and it was only on learning different an hour after, that information was given
to the police.  Chase was immediately given, and the runaway was traced as far as the Duck Ponds (Lara), where the clue was lost, and nothing more had been heard of the escaped prisoner up to a late hour last evening.
The reason of his escape would seem to be that another charge
of horse-stealing is hanging over M’Henry’s head, and he probably heard of this, for it is not likely that for the sake of two or three
months he hnd still to serve that he would expose himsslf to a further sentence for attempting to escape.
He is an old soldier, and up to th time of his conviction was the recipient of a pension for services rendered in the Crimean and Indian wars. His conviction for felony, however, had the effect of making him ineligible of receiving any further payments on
that account.

On This Day ……. 6th of August 1873

The notorious Emily Green, who for some time past has been diverting herself at Ballarat by getting drunk and uncontrollable, and destroying Government property when incarcerated, has again visited this town. Last evening she was found by Constable Digby, near the top of Yarra street, in the centre of a numerous group of boys and men, and apparently suffering from a fit. The constable speedily defined the cause of her illness, but although a cab was procured it was only with the utmost difficulty she was conducted to the watch house, where she subsequently made the ells melodious, before being taken to the Geelong a Gaol.

 

On This Day ……. 5th of August 1880

Two larrikins named William Worzeldine and Walter Daniels were charged at the police court on this day in 1880, with being found in a public place with intent to commit a felony. There was a second charge of vagrancy. Sergeant O’Hare stated that about 10 o’clock on the evening of the 29th of July, he observed the prisoners loitering about in a suspicious manner, and then go up the lane at the rear of Messrs. Bright and Hitchcock’s establishment. He followed them, and arrested Daniels, and Worzeldine was afterwards found in an empty packing case behind the drapery shop. He had not known the prisoners do anything for a living. Mr. Cakebread stated that on the 28th ult., his office was broken into. On the morning of the 29th he found a blank cheque on his desk with the word “bearer” written on it by one of the robbers. Sergeant O’Hare stated that he got Daniels to write the word “bearer,” and the writing was similar to that on the blank cheque. Worzeldine, in defence, stated that he was in the employment of a night man when he was arrested, and always earned an honest livelihood. Daniels made no defence. Worzeldine was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment, and Daniels to nine months’, in the Geelong Gaol.

 

On This Day ……. 4th of August 1884

A woman who wrested with a male named Oswald Brown, at Warrnambool on this day in 1884, was lodged in the Geelong gaol, to await the hearing of the charge against her at the Police Court. The man, who was also brought to Geelong, was
afterwards taken to Ballarat, to account for a buggy and pair of horses which, it is
alleged, he hired in that city and never returned. He has also to appear in Geelong
to perform a similar mission, the carriage and pair having been taken from the stables of Cobb and Co.

 

On This Day ……. 3rd of August 1887

David Craweonr, pawnbroker, pleaded guilty on the charges of using false
pretences, on this day in 1887. He was sentenced to two years imprisonment in the Geelong gaol with hard labor. His Honour said that due to the prisoner’s age he would refrain from adding to the sentence terms of solitary confinement.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd of August 1887

An aged inmate of the Geelong gaol named John Lynch, died at about 7:30pm on this day in 1887, in the hospital attached to that institution. An enquiry will be held upon the remains at 9 o’clock in the morning, before Mr Pardey, J.P.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd of August 1875

A prisoner named George Buckley, undergoing a sentence of 12 months for vagrancy, and who was transferred from the Melbourne Gaol in April last died at the Geelong Gaol on this day in 1875 from phthisis. An inquest was held, and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts of the case.

 

On This Day ……. 31st of July 1890

An inquiry into the supposed murder of George Avery, at the Camperdown Hotel, the particulars of which appeared in The Argus, was commenced in the Camperdown Police Court on this day in 1890, Mr. Heron, P. M. , and a jury of five. A man who occupied the same room with Avery on the night the fatal blow was struck, and who disappeared the next morning, was present in custody, having been arrested yesterday in a hut on Mr. Thomas Shaw’s Wooriwyrite Station, about 17 miles from here. He is a man about 58 years of age, strongly built, has a very marked Scottish accent, and gives the name of William Tudehook. For two days and nights the police have been scouring the country in search of this man. They were accompanied by Mr. Henry, the landlord of the hotel, in order that he might identity the man, who had been at his hotel on the previous Saturday night. When the man was seen at the hotel he carried a bush walking stick, but,when arrested the stick could nowhere be found, and he stated to the police that he had thrown it away. At the inquest, Dr. Pettigrew described the nature of the wound on the top of the deceased’s head, which appeared to have beeninflicted by some sharp instrument, and could not from its position have been easily caused by a fall. Some men who were about the hotel gave formal evidence. Senior constable Quinn, who arrested the prisoner, gave the substance of a conversation he had with him. The prisoner stated that when he left the room on Sunday morning the deceased was in bed, and that he did not notice anything peculiar about him. During the night Avery and he had a conversation in which Avery told him that he had had some trouble with his family, but beyond this nothing more passed between the prisoner and the deceased. The prisoner is a stranger in this district, and unknown to the police. He was remanded to the Geelong Gaol, and the inquiry was adjourned until August 19, to allow the police to collect further evidence.

 

On This Day ……. 30th of July 1929

An Aboriginal, aged 74 years, was on this day in 1929 completed two months imprisonment in Geelong Gaol, declined to leave when he was discharged. It was only after several hours of trouble that he was pressured to sign his property out and go. It was the first time he had been in gaol. He looked the picture of health, and, apparently enjoyed life in the gaol.