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On This Day ……. 6th of August 1873

The notorious Emily Green, who for some time past has been diverting herself at Ballarat by getting drunk and uncontrollable, and destroying Government property when incarcerated, has again visited this town. Last evening she was found by Constable Digby, near the top of Yarra street, in the centre of a numerous group of boys and men, and apparently suffering from a fit. The constable speedily defined the cause of her illness, but although a cab was procured it was only with the utmost difficulty she was conducted to the watch house, where she subsequently made the ells melodious, before being taken to the Geelong a Gaol.

 

On This Day ……. 5th of August 1880

Two larrikins named William Worzeldine and Walter Daniels were charged at the police court on this day in 1880, with being found in a public place with intent to commit a felony. There was a second charge of vagrancy. Sergeant O’Hare stated that about 10 o’clock on the evening of the 29th of July, he observed the prisoners loitering about in a suspicious manner, and then go up the lane at the rear of Messrs. Bright and Hitchcock’s establishment. He followed them, and arrested Daniels, and Worzeldine was afterwards found in an empty packing case behind the drapery shop. He had not known the prisoners do anything for a living. Mr. Cakebread stated that on the 28th ult., his office was broken into. On the morning of the 29th he found a blank cheque on his desk with the word “bearer” written on it by one of the robbers. Sergeant O’Hare stated that he got Daniels to write the word “bearer,” and the writing was similar to that on the blank cheque. Worzeldine, in defence, stated that he was in the employment of a night man when he was arrested, and always earned an honest livelihood. Daniels made no defence. Worzeldine was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment, and Daniels to nine months’, in the Geelong Gaol.

 

On This Day ……. 4th of August 1884

A woman who wrested with a male named Oswald Brown, at Warrnambool on this day in 1884, was lodged in the Geelong gaol, to await the hearing of the charge against her at the Police Court. The man, who was also brought to Geelong, was
afterwards taken to Ballarat, to account for a buggy and pair of horses which, it is
alleged, he hired in that city and never returned. He has also to appear in Geelong
to perform a similar mission, the carriage and pair having been taken from the stables of Cobb and Co.

 

On This Day ……. 3rd of August 1887

David Craweonr, pawnbroker, pleaded guilty on the charges of using false
pretences, on this day in 1887. He was sentenced to two years imprisonment in the Geelong gaol with hard labor. His Honour said that due to the prisoner’s age he would refrain from adding to the sentence terms of solitary confinement.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd of August 1887

An aged inmate of the Geelong gaol named John Lynch, died at about 7:30pm on this day in 1887, in the hospital attached to that institution. An enquiry will be held upon the remains at 9 o’clock in the morning, before Mr Pardey, J.P.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd of August 1875

A prisoner named George Buckley, undergoing a sentence of 12 months for vagrancy, and who was transferred from the Melbourne Gaol in April last died at the Geelong Gaol on this day in 1875 from phthisis. An inquest was held, and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts of the case.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th September 1865

An escape was made by two prisoners from the gaol, named William Henry Thompson and Thomas Reynolds. The former was undergoing a sentence of three years for stealing in the Queen’s Head Hotel, and had been in confinement about fourteen months ; the latter was also undergoing a similar sentence for assaulting an old man and had served half his time. It appears that the prisoners acted as cooks, and at a quarter to six o’clock were let into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. The kitchen is situated in the new wing of the building, and is the only part of it which is not surrounded by the high wall. The windows are protected by strong iron bars, about six inches apart, and which were supposed to be imbedded into the bluestone some two and a half inches. One inch, however, was all that the bar, which was wrenched by the aid of two pieces of wood, had been so fixed. At a few minutes before six one of the warders on his way to the gaol noticed three men standing near to the Pivot Hotel, about a hundred yards from the gaol, fancying that one of them was like Reynolds, he challenged him, saying, “Is that you, Reynolds?” The words were no sooner uttered than the three men separated, the stranger making tracks towards town, and Thompson making a bolt towards Chilwell. The warder, whose name was Kerley, let them go, but made sure of Reynolds, and at a quarter past six that worthy was comfortably ‘installed in his cell. Another of the warders coming across the flat noticed Thompson, and identified him as a prisoner by the brand on his trousers. He immediately started in pursuit, and Thompson, who ran like a deer, headed towards Chilwell, brandishing a knife before him. The chase lasted for a mile and a half, while in turning to attract the attention of the police the warder missed sight of Thompson, who had cleared a fence in gallant style, and disappeared in a Mr. Dobson’s garden, near the Cremorne Hotel. Here the scent was lost, but there is little doubt that Thompson, who is a most desperate character, will soon be safely lodged in the gaol, as active search was being made for him yesterday. When last seen he had a small bundle under his arm, supposed to contain a change of clothes. Of the third man nothing, we believe, has been seen. His part in the business, it is supposed, was that of outside assistant.” Reynolds received an additional 12 months while Thompson was recaptured in Adelaide.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th September 1865

An escape was made by two prisoners from the gaol, named William Henry Thompson and Thomas Reynolds. The former was undergoing a sentence of three years for stealing in the Queen’s Head Hotel, and had been in confinement about fourteen months ; the latter was also undergoing a similar sentence for assaulting an old man and had served half his time. It appears that the prisoners acted as cooks, and at a quarter to six o’clock were let into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. The kitchen is situated in the new wing of the building, and is the only part of it which is not surrounded by the high wall. The windows are protected by strong iron bars, about six inches apart, and which were supposed to be imbedded into the bluestone some two and a half inches. One inch, however, was all that the bar, which was wrenched by the aid of two pieces of wood, had been so fixed. At a few minutes before six one of the warders on his way to the gaol noticed three men standing near to the Pivot Hotel, about a hundred yards from the gaol, fancying that one of them was like Reynolds, he challenged him, saying, “Is that you, Reynolds?” The words were no sooner uttered than the three men separated, the stranger making tracks towards town, and Thompson making a bolt towards Chilwell. The warder, whose name was Kerley, let them go, but made sure of Reynolds, and at a quarter past six that worthy was comfortably ‘installed in his cell. Another of the warders coming across the flat noticed Thompson, and identified him as a prisoner by the brand on his trousers. He immediately started in pursuit, and Thompson, who ran like a deer, headed towards Chilwell, brandishing a knife before him. The chase lasted for a mile and a half, while in turning to attract the attention of the police the warder missed sight of Thompson, who had cleared a fence in gallant style, and disappeared in a Mr. Dobson’s garden, near the Cremorne Hotel. Here the scent was lost, but there is little doubt that Thompson, who is a most desperate character, will soon be safely lodged in the gaol, as active search was being made for him yesterday. When last seen he had a small bundle under his arm, supposed to contain a change of clothes. Of the third man nothing, we believe, has been seen. His part in the business, it is supposed, was that of outside assistant.” Reynolds received an additional 12 months while Thompson was recaptured in Adelaide.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 29th September 1906

The eccentric conduct of a Chinaman named Hey Soon, a month ago led lo his being sent to the Geelong gaol, and he became so much enamoured of that establishment that when his term of imprisonment expired on this day on 1906 he refused to leave. He would not even part with his prison clothes, and when an attempt was made to dispossess him of tho garments he became, so excited that it was not deemed advisable then to release him. He was formally charged with offensive behaviour at the police court, and remanded for one week.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th September 1904

Mary Bowman, the female swindler whose career in the Geelong district was short but lively, appeared at the police court before the police magistrate Mr. Patterson and Messrs. Pardey and Douglass, J’s.P. The prisoner, whose original name appears to be Mary Jean Sinclair, was charged with having, by false representations, obtained the sum of £1 from Mrs. Augustina Ran. of Germantown, and being a rogue and a vagabond. There were several other charges against her. and after a discussion with the P.M. as to the penalty she was liable to, it was decided by the police to rely on the one charge. The defendant, who presented a sullen attitude in the box, and would, not face the court, pleaded guilty. Augustina Ran gave evidence that she had a farm of four acres at Germantown. Accused came to her place on 19th September, and said she wanted to purchase a farm. Witness said the price was £325, and told her to do business with her son. Accused remained at the house that night and said she had a groat big station behind Colac, and gave her a cheque for £70 as part of the”purchase money. She said she had not enough money to pay a small account, and asked the witness for the loan of £1. promising to return two pounds for the one. “Witness said to her, “I don’t want two; I only want my own back.” Accused left next morning, and she did not get her pound back, and found the cheque valueless. Sergeant Hore, admitted that the accused, showing that she had been 17 years in gaol out, over the last 25 years in the country since she arrived from Glasgow. See was sent to Geelong Gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 27th September 1852

An interesting attempt of an escape was made by three prisoners on the 24th of September 1852. Three prisoners had by some means obtained possession of a
small saw and a jemmy bar, which they used to cut away part of the roof, half an inch steel plate. The prisoners had also stolen fat from the kitchen which they carefully filled up the hole, remarkably matching the colour of the fat to the ceiling. Before the prisoners could escape Warden Brodie noticed the fat on the ceiling and on examining realised there was a large hole. Warden Brodie succeeded in getting the jemmy bar, but could not find the saw. Immediately on finding this out, the warden applied to the Visiting Justice of the Peace for an order to put the men in irons, which was granted.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 26th September 1903

Rathor than submit to an order made by the police magistrate, requiring him to pay a small sum weekly towards the State pension drawn by his mother, a, wood merchant, named T. J. Powell, doing a good business in Autumn-street, Geelong West, was arrested, and taken to gaol on this day in 1903 to undergo a two week’s imprisonment, being the alternative to the non-payment of the money.