Posts

Gerry Gee would only talk if he is positioned on the ventriloquist’s Ron Blaskett right hand. Ron, who describes himself as the `straight man’, said: “It seems my brain just can’t carry on a conversation with Gerry if he’s on my left hand. It’s not a problem with the likes of Adolphus, only Gerry.” Ventriloquism, he says, is an art interpreted differently by each performer. “Some guys do clever things with their voice and the doll is adjunct to their talents, others develop a comedian as a figure. Me … I developed a comedy character acceptable to people. I can make people laugh without offending anyone and therefore, can appeal to all age groups. It has worked well for me,” Ron said.

 

Gerry Gee, was a ventriloquist Doll who was brought to life in 1956 by Ron Blaskett, for GTV9’s (channel 9) first live test broadcast from Mt Dandenong, Melbourne Victoria. Gerry was imported from the US at a cost £200 and was named after the station. Ron, wife Merle Blaskett also a ventriloquist and Gerry are the only survivors of the test broadcast (2016). The comedy duo became household names as rich a one as any Aussie entertainer, on radio and TV, on The Tarax Show, IMT (In Melbourne Tonight) and Young Talent Time. And the act travelled the world, playing to millions at the 1975 Toronto Expo, cyclone victims in Darwin and Diggers in Vietnam. Gerry Gee and Ron Blaskett retired together after career of 56 years, Aussie TV’s first and foremost ventriloquist duo.

 

John Field was born in 1949 and grew up at 48 Belgrave Road, East Malvern next door to Denzil Howsons Assistant Programme Manager at GTV9 (Tarax Show). At the age of 9 years old (1959) and in Grade 4, John Field started working as a human stand in for Gerry Gee in a new TV series “The Adventures of Gerry Gee”. Wearing a latex mask to resemble Gerry Gee, Fields was filmed at long distance for action shots. The 5 min episode began on the Tarax Show in 1959 and quickly became a regular and popular segment running for three years. John Field also played Gerry Gee in the 1960 Melbourne Moomba Parade with King Corky.

 

Gerry Gee, is a ventriloquist puppet who teamed up in 1956 with Ron Blaskett, only four days before GTV9’s (Channel 9) first live test broadcast from Mt Dandenong.

Gerry was imported from the US at a cost £200 and was named after the station. Ron, his wife Merle (also a ventriloquist) and Gerry are the only survivors of the test broadcast at GTV9 (2016).

The comedy duo became household names as much as any Aussie entertainer, on radio and TV, on The Tarax Show, IMT (In Melbourne Tonight) and Young Talent Time.

The act travelled the world together, playing to millions at the 1975 Toronto Expo, Cyclone Tracey victims in Darwin and Diggers in Vietnam.

Gerry Gee and Ron Blaskett retired together after career spanning 56 years, Aussie TV’s first and foremost ventriloquist duo!

 

Around the World with Gerry Gee was the idea by director Denzil Howson and Ron Blasket ventriloquist in 1962. The idea was to film a show around Gerry Gee travel adventure around the would filming in Singapore, Italy and England.

Denzil Howson got sponsorship assistance of Air India, the Australian Department of Trade, and Tarax, which financed a six-week world trip to produce this series.

On our later arrival in London, Customs at Heathrow insisted on me opening one of my cases. It was the one containing Gerry Gee and soon the whole Customs hall was in uproar as Ron Bladkett brought him out talking.

Gerry was filmed in London at all the famous locations and with Cornel Wilde (the film star) at Pinewood Studios.

The Adventures of Gerry Gee was the idea by director Denzil Howson to give the children’s audience a more realistic feel of Gerry being a living moving boy. In these story lines Gerry was seen driving Puffing Billy Steam Train, flying a real aeroplane and other clever story line.

This was accomplished by using a boy, John Field a 9 year old boy wearing a face mask of Gerry and dressed the same as Gerry in all the long shots, cutting these with close-ups of the real Gerry Gee puppet.

One of the most popular story lines was “Pimpernel Gee”, in which Gerry played the part of the French Scarlet Pimpernel, based on the book by Baroness Orczy. Gerry wore a coiffured wig and velvet frock clothes of the period and had available a coach and horse which we used to simulate the saving of the French aristocrats from the guillotine.

Fans of Baroness Orczy’s series will recall the English lord, Sir Percy Blakeney (who was made out to be a thick, foppish English aristocrat, but was in reality the Scarlet Pimpernel), whisking away people to the sanctuary of England from the French Revolution. The story was originally made on film with Leslie Howard, Merle Oberon and Raymond Massey as the villain, “Citizen Chauvelin”, a part played by Frank Rich in our version. Gerry, acting as the English lord Sir Percy, was a riot. Raising the monocle to the eye and reciting the famous lines:

They seek him here
They seek him there
Those Frenchmen seek him everywhere
Is he in heaven?
Or is he in hell?
That damned elusive Pimpernel!

Denzil Howson wrote, directed and produced all of these films and they were a success due to his effort and talent.

In October 1991, Denzil Howson and Ron Blaskett were called into channel 9, because lost film archives of The Adventures of Gerry Gee was found. The footage had been missing for 25 years.

On this day …….. 27th September 1956

Gerry Gee, was a ventriloquist Doll who was brought to life in 1956 by Ron Blaskett, for GTV9’s (channel 9) first live test broadcast from Mt Dandenong, Melbourne Victoria, on the 27th September 1956. Gerry Gee was made by Frank Marshall a wood carver in the basement of his house at 5518 S. Loomis, Chicago, USA. Ron Blaskett become aware of Marshall work though fallow ventriloquist Edgar Bergen’s and his doll Charlie McCarthy. Blaskett corresponded with Marshall and he agreed to carve a special figure for £200. Gerry was imported from the US at a cost £200 and was named after the station. Ron, wife Merle Blaskett also a ventriloquist and Gerry are the only survivors of the test broadcast (2016). The comedy duo became household names as Aussie entertainer, on radio and TV, on The Tarax Show, IMT (In Melbourne Tonight) and Young Talent Time. And the act travelled the world, playing to millions at the 1975 Toronto Expo, cyclone victims in Darwin and Diggers in Vietnam. Gerry Gee and Ron Blaskett retired together after career of 56 years, Aussie TV’s first and foremost ventriloquist duo.

 

Gerry Gee would only talk if he is positioned on the ventriloquist’s Ron Blaskett right hand. Ron, who describes himself as the `straight man’, said: “It seems my brain just can’t carry on a conversation with Gerry if he’s on my left hand. It’s not a problem with the likes of Adolphus, only Gerry.” Ventriloquism, he says, is an art interpreted differently by each performer. “Some guys do clever things with their voice and the doll is adjunct to their talents, others develop a comedian as a figure. Me … I developed a comedy character acceptable to people. I can make people laugh without offending anyone and therefore, can appeal to all age groups. It has worked well for me,” Ron said.

 

John Field was born in 1949 and grew up at 48 Belgrave Road, East Malvern next door to Denzil Howsons Assistant Programme Manager at GTV9 (Tarax Show). At the age of 9 years old (1959) and in Grade 4, John Field started working as a human stand in for Gerry Gee in a new TV series “The Adventures of Gerry Gee”. Wearing a latex mask to resemble Gerry Gee, Fields was filmed at long distance for action shots. The 5 min episode began on the Tarax Show in 1959 and quickly became a regular and popular segment running for three years. John Field also played Gerry Gee in the 1960 Melbourne Moomba Parade with King Corky.

 

Gerry Gee, was a ventriloquist Doll who was brought to life in 1956 by Ron Blaskett, for GTV9’s (channel 9) first live test broadcast from Mt Dandenong, Melbourne Victoria. Gerry was imported from the US at a cost £200 and was named after the station. Ron, wife Merle Blaskett also a ventriloquist and Gerry are the only survivors of the test broadcast (2016). The comedy duo became household names as rich a one as any Aussie entertainer, on radio and TV, on The Tarax Show, IMT (In Melbourne Tonight) and Young Talent Time. And the act travelled the world, playing to millions at the 1975 Toronto Expo, cyclone victims in Darwin and Diggers in Vietnam. Gerry Gee and Ron Blaskett retired together after career of 56 years, Aussie TV’s first and foremost ventriloquist duo.

 

The Adventures of Gerry Gee was the idea by director Denzil Howson to give the children’s audience a more realistic feel of Gerry being a living moving boy. In these story lines Gerry was seen driving Puffing Billy Steam Train, flying a real aeroplane and other clever story line.

This was accomplished by using a boy, John Field a 9 year old boy wearing a face mask of Gerry and dressed the same as Gerry in all the long shots, cutting these with close-ups of the real Gerry Gee puppet.

One of the most popular story lines was “Pimpernel Gee”, in which Gerry played the part of the French Scarlet Pimpernel, based on the book by Baroness Orczy. Gerry wore a coiffured wig and velvet frock clothes of the period and had available a coach and horse which we used to simulate the saving of the French aristocrats from the guillotine.

Fans of Baroness Orczy’s series will recall the English lord, Sir Percy Blakeney (who was made out to be a thick, foppish English aristocrat, but was in reality the Scarlet Pimpernel), whisking away people to the sanctuary of England from the French Revolution. The story was originally made on film with Leslie Howard, Merle Oberon and Raymond Massey as the villain, “Citizen Chauvelin”, a part played by Frank Rich in our version. Gerry, acting as the English lord Sir Percy, was a riot. Raising the monocle to the eye and reciting the famous lines:

They seek him here
They seek him there
Those Frenchmen seek him everywhere
Is he in heaven?
Or is he in hell?
That damned elusive Pimpernel!

Denzil Howson wrote, directed and produced all of these films and they were a success due to his effort and talent.

In October 1991, Denzil Howson and Ron Blaskett were called into channel 9, because lost film archives of The Adventures of Gerry Gee was found. The footage had been missing for 25 years.

Around the World with Gerry Gee was the idea by director Denzil Howson and Ron Blasket ventriloquist in 1962. The idea was to film a show around Gerry Gee travel adventure around the would filming in Singapore, Italy and England.

Denzil Howson got sponsorship assistance of Air India, the Australian Department of Trade, and Tarax, which financed a six-week world trip to produce this series.

On our later arrival in London, Customs at Heathrow insisted on me opening one of my cases. It was the one containing Gerry Gee and soon the whole Customs hall was in uproar as Ron Bladkett brought him out talking.

Gerry was filmed in London at all the famous locations and with Cornel Wilde (the film star) at Pinewood Studios.