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ON THIS DAY – July 20, 1915

CHARGE OF MURDER.

At the Sale Police Court Samuel Smith was charged with murdering John Duffy at Genoa, Gippsland, on July 20. It was alleged that at a recruiting meeting a dispute arose, Duffy receiving a gunshot wound from which he died a few days later. Smith received 2 years in the Sale Gaol for manslaughter.

Certainly per European history shows Tasmanian Tigers-Zebra Wolfs (Thylacine) roamed large parts of main land Australia. There is plenty of evidence in fossil remains and Aboriginal cave art. But is it possible they still lived in Victoria as little as 100 years ago. Interesting idea when the last known Thylacine died at the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September 1936, and Thylacine’s were declared extinct by international standards in 1986. However there are many accounts of wolf-lions-tiger like animals killing live stock through Gippsland, North East and central Victoria and as far as Tantanoola in South Australia. Below is an account of animal killed by a farmer on the 29th June 1916 at Mirboo North, South Gippsland, Victoria.

The sheep-killing animal that was found poisoned in Mr J. Gilfedder’s paddock, close to the Mirboo North township, Victoria recently, does not appear to be either a dingo or a fox. It was two or three times as large as either of those animals. It had the legs, paws and nails of a dog, and the snout and tail of a fox or a dingo. Its mode of killing sheep was to worry their rumps and pull away some of the entrails. Residents who saw-it say that it was a cross between a dingo or a fox and a dog. To ascertain if possible what the animal was, Mr. Gilfedder intends sending the skull, claws and tail to the Director of the Melbourne Zoo, who is recognised as an authority on animals. Some people at Yinnar who had sheep destroyed in the way described poisoned the carcases; but the animal would not take the bait. A successful way to destroy any other of such breed as turn up among sheep is to skin rabbits and put them in a fire, and thus destroy the smell of the hands, and use one as a trail, and cut others, and lay the baits along the trail, without touching them with the hands. This was the method Mr Gilfedder used. Since the death of the animal we have not heard of any sheep being worried around the district. Mr Gilfedder received the following letter from Mr D. Gibson, of the National Bank, Maffra: – “Dear Sir, – I saw in the paper some few days ago that you had poisoned an animal, somewhat like a dingo, but larger, that had been destroying your sheep. I enclose a rough sketch of the Tasmanian zebra wolf, in the hope that it may enable you to identify it with that animal. I and others have seen them up in the mountains; but the fact of their being indigenous to Victoria has never been established by their capture. Probably they are the animal vaguely called the ‘Tantanoola tiger’ and the ‘Morwell lion,’ which has been seen in so many localities. The zebra wolf is a marsupial, coloured from French-grey to russet brown, according to the season, and striped with dark brown to black on back and tail, and less conspicuously on the legs. The coat is short and close, build very strong, pads especially large for its size, powerful hindquarters, progresses either at a trot or by long bounds, height at shoulder 2ft. 6in. to 3ft. I have seen one in captivity which stood on its hind legs over 5ft. high. They are night prowlers, and carry their young in a pouch. They use hollow logs, etc., to camp in, and cover long distances, rarely coming out in the daylight. This is the reason why they have escaped capture so long. The skin or cleaned skeleton would be eagerly purchased by either Melbourne Zoo (D. Le Soeuf), or the National Gallery Museum. Probably they would fetch £20 or so; so they are worth saving.”

ON THIS DAY…… 16th December 1972

Edwin Eastwood famous for the Faraday School Kidnapping in 1972, and Michael Pantic escaped from the Geelong Gaol on the 16th of December 1976. The men tunnelled though two doubled skinned brick wells, cut through a padlock to an outside excise yard and scaled the external wall and were able to steal a car to make his get away, before the men parted ways. Eastwood walked into the Wooreen State School in Gippsland on the 15th of February 1977, where he kidnapped a teacher and nine pupils, forcing them into a van. While driving off, he collided with a truck and held the driver and his partner hostage. Soon another log truck came along and Eastwood waved it to a stop, and took the drive and his mate hostage. The next to arrive was two lady’s towing a caravan, which where also taken hostage. Once Eastwood had sixteen hostages, he demanded a ransom from the Victorian Government of US $7 million, weapons, 100kgm of heroin and cocaine, and the release of seventeen prisoners from Pentridge. One of the hostages managed to escaped and notified police. Once Eastwood realised that one of his hostages was gone he fled the seem with the remaining hostages, locked in the campervan. A police block and gunfire at Woodside was enough to stop Eastwood, where he was shot below the right knee and re-captured. Eastwood was charged and pleaded guilty to 25 charges, including 16 counts of kidnapping and was sentenced on 8 November 1977 to 21 years with a non parole period of 18 years. Eastwood was released in 1993 after choosing to decline parole offered in 1991.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 20, 1915

CHARGE OF MURDER.

At the Sale Police Court Samuel Smith was charged with murdering John Duffy at Genoa, Gippsland, on July 20. It was alleged that at a recruiting meeting a dispute arose, Duffy receiving a gunshot wound from which he died a few days later. Smith received 2 years in the Sale Gaol for manslaughter.

Certainly per European history shows Tasmanian Tigers-Zebra Wolfs (Thylacine) roamed large parts of main land Australia. There is plenty of evidence in fossil remains and Aboriginal cave art. But is it possible they still lived in Victoria as little as 100 years ago. Interesting idea when the last known Thylacine died at the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September 1936, and Thylacine’s were declared extinct by international standards in 1986. However there are many accounts of wolf-lions-tiger like animals killing live stock through Gippsland, North East and central Victoria and as far as Tantanoola in South Australia. Below is an account of animal killed by a farmer on the 29th June 1916 at Mirboo North, South Gippsland, Victoria.

The sheep-killing animal that was found poisoned in Mr J. Gilfedder’s paddock, close to the Mirboo North township, Victoria recently, does not appear to be either a dingo or a fox. It was two or three times as large as either of those animals. It had the legs, paws and nails of a dog, and the snout and tail of a fox or a dingo. Its mode of killing sheep was to worry their rumps and pull away some of the entrails. Residents who saw-it say that it was a cross between a dingo or a fox and a dog. To ascertain if possible what the animal was, Mr. Gilfedder intends sending the skull, claws and tail to the Director of the Melbourne Zoo, who is recognised as an authority on animals. Some people at Yinnar who had sheep destroyed in the way described poisoned the carcases; but the animal would not take the bait. A successful way to destroy any other of such breed as turn up among sheep is to skin rabbits and put them in a fire, and thus destroy the smell of the hands, and use one as a trail, and cut others, and lay the baits along the trail, without touching them with the hands. This was the method Mr Gilfedder used. Since the death of the animal we have not heard of any sheep being worried around the district. Mr Gilfedder received the following letter from Mr D. Gibson, of the National Bank, Maffra: – “Dear Sir, – I saw in the paper some few days ago that you had poisoned an animal, somewhat like a dingo, but larger, that had been destroying your sheep. I enclose a rough sketch of the Tasmanian zebra wolf, in the hope that it may enable you to identify it with that animal. I and others have seen them up in the mountains; but the fact of their being indigenous to Victoria has never been established by their capture. Probably they are the animal vaguely called the ‘Tantanoola tiger’ and the ‘Morwell lion,’ which has been seen in so many localities. The zebra wolf is a marsupial, coloured from French-grey to russet brown, according to the season, and striped with dark brown to black on back and tail, and less conspicuously on the legs. The coat is short and close, build very strong, pads especially large for its size, powerful hindquarters, progresses either at a trot or by long bounds, height at shoulder 2ft. 6in. to 3ft. I have seen one in captivity which stood on its hind legs over 5ft. high. They are night prowlers, and carry their young in a pouch. They use hollow logs, etc., to camp in, and cover long distances, rarely coming out in the daylight. This is the reason why they have escaped capture so long. The skin or cleaned skeleton would be eagerly purchased by either Melbourne Zoo (D. Le Soeuf), or the National Gallery Museum. Probably they would fetch £20 or so; so they are worth saving.”

On this day …….. 15th of April 1908

Whilst watching his brother cutting wood at Buffalo, Gippsland on this day in 1908, William Beckham, four years of age, was struck on the foot by the axe. He was brought to the Melbourne Hospital suffering from a severe cut on the right foot.

On this day ………… 15th March 1899

A sad accident happened on this day in 1899, to Mr Harry Smedley. Mr Smedley, who has been working for Mr Gillies, timber contractor, decided to go to Gippsland with the other employees of Mr Gillies. A number of men set out on a large wagon drawn by a team of bullocks and loaded with the various articles necessary for forming a camp. When the party was passing Coldstream Mr Smedley, by some means, fell under one of the wheels which partly passed over him, crushing him badly. He was taken with all speed to Lilydale, where it was found that the case was a serious one. His relatives were hastily summoned, and everything done to alleviate his suffering.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – March 12, 1929

ERICA

Anna Elizabeth Hillard, convicted of the manslaughter of David Wilson, at Erica, Gippsland nearly collapsed when, at the Criminal Court, Justice MacFarlane sentenced her to 10 years’ hard labour. She clutched at the rail of the dock, swayed, and then steadied herself again. Anna Hillard (36) and Albert George Wilson (23) were charged with having murdered Wilson’s father, David Wilson (55), at Erica, on March 12. Wilson was acquitted and Hillard was found guilty of manslaughter, after a trial which lasted three days. Hillard’s eight children will probably be cared for by the State.

 

 

On this day ………… 7th February 1877

Joseph Hudson a Blacksmith at Stringers creek in Gippsland committed his brother Richard to the Mayday Hills Asylum on the 5th of November 1869, because he could no longer look after him. Hudson wife was in Pentridge at the time and had been for a while. Hudson escaped on this day in 1877, but was recaptured the following day. Hudson would escape once more on the January the 28th 1878, were he was at large or five days.

 

 

On this day …….. 28th of January 1878

ESCAPED LUNATIC

Joseph Hudson a Blacksmith at Stringers creek in Gippsland committed his brother Richard to the Mayday Hills Asylum on the 5th of November 1869, because he could no longer look after him. Hudson’s wife was in Pentridge at the time and had been for a while. Hudson escaped on the 7th February 1877, but was recaptured the following day. Hudson would escape once more on the January the 28th 1878, were he was at large or five days.

 

EXECUTED THIS DAY – January 13, 1896

Charles Henry Strange was hanged in Melbourne Gaol on this day in 1896, for the murder of his mate, Frederick Dowse, at Cunningham, Gippsland, on the 7th of November. The execution was successfully performed, death being instantaneous. Strange remained cool and firm, without the slightest bodily tremor. The hangman Thomas Roberts, stated that Strange was the coolest and most self-possessed criminal who had ever passed through his hands. On evening before the murderer was visited by his father, mother, and sister, and last evening by his wife, with whom be had an affecting parting that quite broke up Strange for a time, but he soon recovered his previous composure.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 6, 1859

Mr Cornelius Green, commission agent of Bruthen and Omeo, was shot by bushrangers whilst on his way from Omeo with gold on this day in 1859, Mr Green left Swift’s Creek in company with a mounted trooper and Mr Thomas Jenkins. His gold supposed to be about 1000 ounces was secured on a packhorse. A short distance from Swift’s Creek the party were fired upon by bushrangers. Mr Green was shot dead, and Mr Jenkins severely wounded and the mounted constable had his arm broken when shot. Cornelius Green is buried in the Omeo, and a stone monument marks the location of the attack at Swifts Creek.