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On this day …….. 10th May 1902

Patrick McDonnell landlord of the Railway Hotel in Glenrowan, North East Victoria, who became known as part of the folklore of the Kelly Gang years, died on this day. It was from this hotel that the rockets were fired as part of the plan built around the Siege of Glenrowan. Patrick had come to Australia in 1850 at the age of eighteen. He tryed his luck on the Ovens Goldfields, by fore opening a brewery with his uncle.

ON THIS DAY ……… 17th March 1909

Yackandandah

A regrettable accident happened at the Yackandandah show, North East Victoria, on this day in 1909. Mr. Whelan, the private secretary to the Minister for Mines, who was in attendance, asked to be allowed to mount a horse owned by Mr. Nolan, of Glenrowan. When mounting he fell over the other side of the horse and broke his left arm. Dr. Johnson attended to the limb, and Mr. Whelan proceeded with the party in the motor car to Melbourne during the afternoon.

 

 

On this day ………… 11th February 1897

An inquest was held at Greta, near Benalla, to ascertain the cause of the death of Ellen Skillion, 22 years of age, a niece of the notorious bushranger, Ned Kelly. A verdict that the deceased committed suicide by drowning was returned. The deceased was a daughter of the late Mrs. Skillion, whose husband is said to have started the first trouble which led to Ned Kelly and his confederates beginning the career of lawlessness which culminated in their down- fall as bushrangers at Glenrowan.

 

On this day …….. 29th of October 1880

Ned Kelly sentenced to execution

Ned Kelly, Australia’s most famous bushranger, was born in December 1854 in Victoria, Australia. Kelly was twelve when his father died, and he was subsequently required to leave school to take on the new position as head of the family. Shortly after this, the Kellys moved to Glenrowan. As a teenager, Ned became involved in petty crimes, regularly targetting the wealthy landowners. He gradually progressed to crimes of increasing seriousness and violence, including bank robbery and murder, soon becoming a hunted man. Many of Ned Kelly’s peers held him in high regard for his stand of usually only ambushing wealthy landowners, and helped to keep his whereabouts from the police, despite the high reward posted for his capture. However, he was betrayed to the police whilst holding dozens of people hostage in the Glenrowan Inn in June, 1880. Wearing their famous armour, the Kelly brothers held a shootout with police. The Kelly brothers were killed, but Ned was shot twenty-eight times in the legs, being unprotected by the armour. He survived to stand trial, and was sentenced to death by hanging, by Judge Redmond Barry on 29 October 1880. Ned Kelly was hanged in Melbourne on 11 November 1880.

On this day …….. 28th of October 1880

Ned Kelly first stood trial on 19 October 1880 in Melbourne before the Irish-born judge Justice Sir Redmond Barry. Mr Smyth and Mr Chomley appeared for the crown and Mr Bindon for the prisoner. The trial was adjourned to 28 October, when Kelly was presented on the charge of the murder of Sergeant Kennedy, Constable Scanlan and Lonigan, the various bank robberies, the murder of Sherritt, resisting arrest at Glenrowan and with a long list of minor charges. He was convicted of the willful murder of Constable Lonigan and was sentenced to death by hanging by Justice Barry. Several unusual exchanges between Kelly and the judge included the judge’s customary words “May God have mercy on your soul”, to which Kelly replied “I will go a little further than that, and say I will see you there where I go.” At Kelly’s request, his picture was taken and he was granted farewell interviews with family members. His mother’s last words to him were reported to be “Mind you die like a Kelly.”

After a failed attempt to derail a police train, and the shootout that followed, Ned Kelly was taken into custody at Glenrowan in June 1880. To capitalise on his capture, photographer William Burman staged a re-enactment within weeks, having replicated the notorious bushranger’s homemade suit of armour. The copyright laws at the time meant that photographers could patent their images and charge for each individual use. Kelly remained a subject of intense public interest until his execution, 13 days after his trial, on November 11, 1880.

 

On this day …….. 27th of June 1880

Most of the law abiding element of Glenrowan’s population had been rounded up by Ned Kelly and his gang and held hostage in Ann Jones Inn. This was so the Kelly’s could de rail the train tacks and no warning of the trap towards the police and their special train coming from Melbourne. As the day wore n, and no police train appeared along the tracks, the tense atmosphere developed, and by late night, it appeared that there would be no train. The police train finally left Melbourne for Beechworth in North East Victoria, at 10pm, with police, horses and blacktrackers.

On this day …….. 26th of June 1880

This day in 1880 was a Saturday, and would go down in Australian history as the last stand between the notorious Kelly Gang of North a East Victoria and the Victoria Police. Ned Kelly and Steve Hart rounded up the population of the small town of Glenrowan and locked them in Ann Jones Inn. Joe Byrne and Dan Kelly rode off towards Beechworth to find Aaron Sherritt once a friend now police informant. The Kelly would then force railway workers to derail a section of the Melbourne to Sydney train line. This was done after the last passenger train passed at 9pm, and there would be no more scheduled services until the following Monday.

On this day …….. 26th of June 1880

Ned Kelly, Australia’s most famous bushranger, was born in December 1854 in Beveridge, Victoria. As a teenager, he became involved in petty crimes, regularly targetting the wealthy landowners. He gradually progressed to crimes of increasing seriousness and violence, including bank robbery and murder, soon becoming a hunted man. Ned Kelly’s gang consisted of himself, his brother Dan, Joe Byrne and Steve Hart. One of Kelly’s more daring bank robberies was carried out in December 1878 when Kelly and his gang rode into the Victorian town of Euroa, where they robbed the National Bank of about 2,000 pounds. As a result of this robbery, the reward for their capture was increased to 1,000 pounds each. Aaron Sherritt was an associate of the Kellys, having grown up in the same area, and he was quite close to the Byrne family. He was engaged to Byrne’s sister for awhile. After the gang was outlawed following the murder of three policemen at Stringybark Creek in October 1878, Sherritt turned police informant for money. Sherritt advised the police to camp out in a cave near Byrne’s family home in the hopes of capturing Byrne as he visited his mother. Sherritt’s presence was noted, and Byrne’s sister broke off her engagement to him. Many months later, on the night of 26 June 1880, Sherritt was at home with his new wife, mother-in-law and four policemen. When Sherritt answered a knock at the door, he was shot dead by Byrne. The police officers hid, as they were unsure whether they were Byrne’s real target, and did not report the killing until late the following morning. Within a couple of days, Byrne was himself killed in a shootout at Glenrowan between the gang and the police. Ned Kelly was the only one to survive to stand trial, after which he was hanged.

ON THIS DAY ………. 26th of June 1880

Aaron Sherritt was born in 1855 and was an associate by Joe Byrne and Dan Kelly on the 26th of June 1880. On the night of the 26th June 1880 Sherritt was at home with his wife, mother-in-law and four policemen, Constables Armstrong, Alexander, Ducross, and Dowling. A neighbour, Antoine Weekes, who had been handcuffed and held hostage by Joe Byrne and Dan Kelly, called out “Aaron” at the front door of Sherritt’s hut. When Sherritt answered it, Joe Byrne shot him dead. The police officers hid under the bed and did not report the killing until late the following morning. Within a couple of days, Joe Byrne was himself killed in a shootout between the gang and the police at Glenrowan. Ned Kelly was the only one to survive to stand trial. He was found guilty and hanged on the 11th November 1880.

 

On this day …….. 10th May 1902

Patrick McDonnell landlord of the Railway Hotel in Glenrowan, North East Victoria, who became known as part of the folklore of the Kelly Gang years, died on this day. It was from this hotel that the rockets were fired as part of the plan built around the Siege of Glenrowan. Patrick had come to Australia in 1850 at the age of eighteen. He tryed his luck on the Ovens Goldfields, by fore opening a brewery with his uncle.

ON THIS DAY ……… 17th March 1909

Yackandandah

A regrettable accident happened at the Yackandandah show, North East Victoria, on this day in 1909. Mr. Whelan, the private secretary to the Minister for Mines, who was in attendance, asked to be allowed to mount a horse owned by Mr. Nolan, of Glenrowan. When mounting he fell over the other side of the horse and broke his left arm. Dr. Johnson attended to the limb, and Mr. Whelan proceeded with the party in the motor car to Melbourne during the afternoon.