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ON THIS DAY – July 1, 1970

IT takes a truly monstrous man to attach alligator clips to the ears of his sleeping wife and children then zap them with electricity.  The sort of cruel coward who would also use a hammer to belt his six-year-old daughter in the head. Elmer Kyle Crawford is just such a man, a coroner found. He acted not in a fit of rage, but after weeks of planning the ghastly murders of his pregnant wife and three children. Crawford electrocuted and bashed his family to death at their home in Cardinal Rd, Glenroy, on July 1, 1970. And he got away with it – so far.

Running through what is known of the killings, it is easy to see why Victorians were appalled. Although not qualified as an electrician, Crawford worked in that capacity for the Victoria Racing Club at Flemington racecourse for 14 years. Workmates told police there was no indication he was capable of such an atrocity. No trouble at home that they knew of. But something troubled Crawford enough to painstakingly plan what he hoped would be the perfect crime — one that would leave him looking like the deserted husband whose wife ran away with the kids. The evidence points to Crawford planning to report his wife and children had gone missing. The new wills he and his wife drafted two weeks earlier would have left him very comfortably off. He was forced to rapidly change plans and disappear after a quirk of fate meant the bodies didn’t sink in the ocean without trace as planned. Crawford was busy cleaning up the blood in the family home when he found out the car he had earlier pushed off a cliff hadn’t disappeared into the Blowhole at Loch Ard Gorge near Port Campbell. Indeed it had been found teetering on a ledge just above the churning sea. He abandoned plans to destroy all incriminating evidence and simply disappeared .

Police have been unable to establish why Crawford murdered his wife Therese, 35, and children Kathryn, 13, James, 8 and Karen, 6. One possibility is the couple argued over whether or not to terminate Therese’s fourth pregnancy. That theory is based on an unfinished letter from Mrs Crawford to her family in which she indicated she wasn’t happy about being pregnant again. “I have been so upset, but what’s the use, I am two and a half months now,” she wrote. “So looks like I have had it this time. “We were going to come up home this Christmas but won’t be able to now as I’ll be due the end of January.” Police found the letter along with a newspaper article about abortion written by prominent Right to Life campaigner Margaret Tighe. They also discovered items Crawford had stolen from the VRC and evidence he had been selling stolen goods for years. That led to another theory, that Mrs Crawford may have found out her husband was a thief and threatened to expose him.

Evidence left by Crawford paints a chilling picture of how he killed his family. He made a bizarre electrocution device consisting of a 15m length of electrical cord with a plug at one end and an extension cord socket on the other. Running from the main cord were five smaller leads, each with alligator clips on the end. Crawford waited until his wife and children were asleep before murdering them. He used his electrocution device on his wife, eldest daughter Kathryn and James. Crawford also bashed Kathryn and James in the head, almost certainly with a hammer, fracturing their skulls. Little Karen was spared electrocution, but she was beaten to death with the hammer. Crawford had earlier removed the back seat of his 1956 Holden sedan so he could stack the four pyjama-clad bodies inside. He wrapped each body in a blanket and then put a tarpaulin over them. He then drove hundreds of kilometres to Loch Ard Gorge. But a drainage ditch just before the edge of the cliff stopped him from pushing the car over the edge. Undeterred, he spent an estimated two hours building a bridge of rocks so he could roll the car down the slight slope, across his makeshift bridge and over the cliff. His intention was that it would plunge into the Blowhole and never be seen again. As an extra precaution, in case the car and the bodies were later found, he attached a hose to the exhaust and jammed it through the driver’s side window to make it look as though Mrs Crawford had committed suicide after beating her children to death. That’s probably why she was the only one electrocuted and not bashed. As he pushed the car over the cliff, Crawford would not have seen the rocky ledge 16m below. Thinking his grisly task complete, Crawford made his way back home. Police don’t know how he returned to Glenroy, but it is possible he hitchhiked or rode a small motor scooter he carried to Port Campbell in the boot with the bodies. They believe he murdered his family and tried to dispose of the bodies sometime between sunset on July 1 and the early hours of July 2.

Sightseers first noticed the car perched precariously on the ledge at the Blowhole at 1.30pm on July 2. Crawford was seen in the driveway of his home at 5.50pm that day. Broadmeadows police officer John McCarty was sent to the Crawford home at 6.20pm after a registration number check revealed the car was owned by Crawford. It had not yet been possible to search the car because it was a dangerous process requiring cliff rescue experts. Evidence suggests Crawford was inside the house cleaning up blood when Constable McCarty knocked on the door. The knock went unanswered and, because it was just a routine inquiry at that stage, Constable McCarty went back to the station. Police presume it was at this point Crawford abandoned his plan to pretend his wife and children had left him and fled himself. Constable McCarty went back to the house at 10pm after receiving information from Port Campbell there was a rifle in the car and blood on the seats. He and another officer broke in when no-one answered the door. They discovered blood-stained sheets and mattresses. The homicide squad was called in and arrangements made to search the car at first light the next day.

Cliff rescue volunteers George Cumming and Cecil Burgin were lowered down, secured the car to prevent it slipping into the sea then started to search it. “We lifted the tarpaulin and Cec Burgin said ‘I can see some feet’ and as the tarpaulin was lifted further I saw three sets of feet,” Mr Cumming said.”When the tarpaulin was moved a bedspread was folded back and I saw four bodies wrapped in bed sheets.” Homicide squad detective Adrian Donehue, who went on to become head of the major crime squad, was at the top of the cliff that day.” I made an examination of each of the bodies as they were brought up,” he said. He was the first to realise the savagery of a crime that has haunted several generations of Victorian police.

Editors note – This article on the Crawford murders is explored in more detail in the excellent book “Almost Perfect” by Greg Fogarty.

ON THIS DAY – 20th December 1938

George Green, 38, chimney sweep, of West Heidleberg, was committed for trail on a charge of having murdered Annie Wiseman, 62, and her niece. Phyllis Wiseman, 17, at Glenroy on the 12th of November. Charles Anthony Taylor, Government analyst, gave evidence of having found soot on a bicycle pump handed to him by the police. He said he also examined the Wiseman house and articles of clothing. In a room in the house he found a hair 18 in. long on a carpet. The way the hair was embedded in the carpet indicated that a head had been violently moved from side to side on the carpet. He found human bloodstains in the carpet. On a pyjama coat worn by Phyllis Wiseman there were smears of blood and discoloured marks near the neck suggested that she had been stabbed and pulled by a dirty hand. The same type of mark was found on a pink undergarment. Detective-sergeant Sickerdick gave evidence of a conversation he had with Green before Green was charged. Witness said that when questioned Green denied having been near the Wiseman home on the 12th November. He accounted for certain money he had as money from a winning bet. He admitted that he had slept in the open on the Saturday night, but he could not show witness the place. He said he had been drunk, but had been able to ride his bicycle.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 1, 1970

IT takes a truly monstrous man to attach alligator clips to the ears of his sleeping wife and children then zap them with electricity.  The sort of cruel coward who would also use a hammer to belt his six-year-old daughter in the head. Elmer Kyle Crawford is just such a man, a coroner found. He acted not in a fit of rage, but after weeks of planning the ghastly murders of his pregnant wife and three children. Crawford electrocuted and bashed his family to death at their home in Cardinal Rd, Glenroy, on July 1, 1970. And he got away with it – so far.

Running through what is known of the killings, it is easy to see why Victorians were appalled. Although not qualified as an electrician, Crawford worked in that capacity for the Victoria Racing Club at Flemington racecourse for 14 years. Workmates told police there was no indication he was capable of such an atrocity. No trouble at home that they knew of. But something troubled Crawford enough to painstakingly plan what he hoped would be the perfect crime — one that would leave him looking like the deserted husband whose wife ran away with the kids. The evidence points to Crawford planning to report his wife and children had gone missing. The new wills he and his wife drafted two weeks earlier would have left him very comfortably off. He was forced to rapidly change plans and disappear after a quirk of fate meant the bodies didn’t sink in the ocean without trace as planned. Crawford was busy cleaning up the blood in the family home when he found out the car he had earlier pushed off a cliff hadn’t disappeared into the Blowhole at Loch Ard Gorge near Port Campbell. Indeed it had been found teetering on a ledge just above the churning sea. He abandoned plans to destroy all incriminating evidence and simply disappeared .

Police have been unable to establish why Crawford murdered his wife Therese, 35, and children Kathryn, 13, James, 8 and Karen, 6. One possibility is the couple argued over whether or not to terminate Therese’s fourth pregnancy. That theory is based on an unfinished letter from Mrs Crawford to her family in which she indicated she wasn’t happy about being pregnant again. “I have been so upset, but what’s the use, I am two and a half months now,” she wrote. “So looks like I have had it this time. “We were going to come up home this Christmas but won’t be able to now as I’ll be due the end of January.” Police found the letter along with a newspaper article about abortion written by prominent Right to Life campaigner Margaret Tighe. They also discovered items Crawford had stolen from the VRC and evidence he had been selling stolen goods for years. That led to another theory, that Mrs Crawford may have found out her husband was a thief and threatened to expose him.

Evidence left by Crawford paints a chilling picture of how he killed his family. He made a bizarre electrocution device consisting of a 15m length of electrical cord with a plug at one end and an extension cord socket on the other. Running from the main cord were five smaller leads, each with alligator clips on the end. Crawford waited until his wife and children were asleep before murdering them. He used his electrocution device on his wife, eldest daughter Kathryn and James. Crawford also bashed Kathryn and James in the head, almost certainly with a hammer, fracturing their skulls. Little Karen was spared electrocution, but she was beaten to death with the hammer. Crawford had earlier removed the back seat of his 1956 Holden sedan so he could stack the four pyjama-clad bodies inside. He wrapped each body in a blanket and then put a tarpaulin over them. He then drove hundreds of kilometres to Loch Ard Gorge. But a drainage ditch just before the edge of the cliff stopped him from pushing the car over the edge. Undeterred, he spent an estimated two hours building a bridge of rocks so he could roll the car down the slight slope, across his makeshift bridge and over the cliff. His intention was that it would plunge into the Blowhole and never be seen again. As an extra precaution, in case the car and the bodies were later found, he attached a hose to the exhaust and jammed it through the driver’s side window to make it look as though Mrs Crawford had committed suicide after beating her children to death. That’s probably why she was the only one electrocuted and not bashed. As he pushed the car over the cliff, Crawford would not have seen the rocky ledge 16m below. Thinking his grisly task complete, Crawford made his way back home. Police don’t know how he returned to Glenroy, but it is possible he hitchhiked or rode a small motor scooter he carried to Port Campbell in the boot with the bodies. They believe he murdered his family and tried to dispose of the bodies sometime between sunset on July 1 and the early hours of July 2.

Sightseers first noticed the car perched precariously on the ledge at the Blowhole at 1.30pm on July 2. Crawford was seen in the driveway of his home at 5.50pm that day. Broadmeadows police officer John McCarty was sent to the Crawford home at 6.20pm after a registration number check revealed the car was owned by Crawford. It had not yet been possible to search the car because it was a dangerous process requiring cliff rescue experts. Evidence suggests Crawford was inside the house cleaning up blood when Constable McCarty knocked on the door. The knock went unanswered and, because it was just a routine inquiry at that stage, Constable McCarty went back to the station. Police presume it was at this point Crawford abandoned his plan to pretend his wife and children had left him and fled himself. Constable McCarty went back to the house at 10pm after receiving information from Port Campbell there was a rifle in the car and blood on the seats. He and another officer broke in when no-one answered the door. They discovered blood-stained sheets and mattresses. The homicide squad was called in and arrangements made to search the car at first light the next day.

Cliff rescue volunteers George Cumming and Cecil Burgin were lowered down, secured the car to prevent it slipping into the sea then started to search it. “We lifted the tarpaulin and Cec Burgin said ‘I can see some feet’ and as the tarpaulin was lifted further I saw three sets of feet,” Mr Cumming said.”When the tarpaulin was moved a bedspread was folded back and I saw four bodies wrapped in bed sheets.” Homicide squad detective Adrian Donehue, who went on to become head of the major crime squad, was at the top of the cliff that day.” I made an examination of each of the bodies as they were brought up,” he said. He was the first to realise the savagery of a crime that has haunted several generations of Victorian police.

Editors note – This article on the Crawford murders is explored in more detail in the excellent book “Almost Perfect” by Greg Fogarty.

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 2, 1992

Notorious Bega schoolgirl killer Leslie Camilleri has been jailed for 28 years for the murder of 13-year-old Prue Bird in 1992. Victorian Supreme Court Justice Elizabeth Curtain said she was satisfied Camilleri, 43, who is already serving two life sentences without parole for raping and murdering Bega schoolgirls Lauren Barry and Nichole Collins in 1997, and two other men had abducted and murdered Prue. Justice Curtain said she had rejected Camilleri’s claims that he had acted alone. She said Camilleri and the two other men had abducted a defenceless 13-year-old from her home in circumstances that must have been terrifying for her. She said the evidence did not disclose how Prue was murdered but Camilleri’s conduct “bespeaks criminality of the highest order”. Camilleri had shown “a cruel and callous disregard for the sanctity of human life”. Justice Curtain did not believe Camilleri’s account that he alone had grabbed Prue as she walked along the street outside her Glenroy home on February 2, 1992. Camilleri claimed he put Prue face down on the back seat of his car and tied her arms and legs with electrical cables before driving around for several hours. Camilleri said when he later pulled over to the side of the road, he realised she was dead. Justice Curtain said Camilleri’s claim that the death was an accident was inconsistent with his guilty plea to murder but she accepted there was no evidence to prove Prue had been sexually assaulted before she was killed. Camilleri had claimed he dumped Prue’s body at a garbage tip in Frankston but police found nothing after digging up the site and a check of council records revealed it was not used as a tip at the time. Defence barrister John Kelly said Camilleri had tried his best to remember where he had left Prue’s body but his memory had been affected by drug taking at the time. Camilleri, who had been on parole after being jailed for assault in Queensland, said that as he was driving Prue’s body to the tip he also had in the car the dismembered body of a man he had murdered for abusing him as a child. Camilleri, a father of four who has converted to Islam while in jail, said he had placed Prue’s body, which he had wrapped in a quilt, inside a discarded wardrobe. Justice Curtain said she was satisfied, based on the evidence of a witness, that Camilleri and another man had been driving around the streets of Glenroy looking for a young girl. Another witness said she saw Prue being driven away by two men. A third man was seen nearby in a second car. The witness, who the judge said was credible, said Prue looked like she was waving and banging on the car’s window as if to say, “Help me, help me.” This witness did not go to the police because “you don’t think your friend is going to be kidnapped”. Police believe Prue was killed between the day she was abducted and nine days later when Camilleri was arrested interstate on outstanding warrants. Prue has not been seen or heard from since February 2, 1992 and her body has never been found. Outside court, Prue’s mother Jenny said she was totally exhausted after more than two decades of trying to find out what had happened to her daughter. “I’m glad of the outcome. “I knew he (Camilleri) didn’t act alone. I knew he was lying. This is the best I was hoping for that it was ruled he didn’t act alone.” Mrs Bird said she still prayed that one day Prue’s body would be found so she could lay her to rest. “I still don’t know what happened to Prue, I still haven’t got Prue. I hope one day that I get to know.”

 

 

ON THIS DAY – 20th December 1938

George Green, 38, chimney sweep, of West Heidleberg, was committed for trail on a charge of having murdered Annie Wiseman, 62, and her niece. Phyllis Wiseman, 17, at Glenroy on the 12th of November. Charles Anthony Taylor, Government analyst, gave evidence of having found soot on a bicycle pump handed to him by the police. He said he also examined the Wiseman house and articles of clothing. In a room in the house he found a hair 18 in. long on a carpet. The way the hair was embedded in the carpet indicated that a head had been violently moved from side to side on the carpet. He found human bloodstains in the carpet. On a pyjama coat worn by Phyllis Wiseman there were smears of blood and discoloured marks near the neck suggested that she had been stabbed and pulled by a dirty hand. The same type of mark was found on a pink undergarment. Detective-sergeant Sickerdick gave evidence of a conversation he had with Green before Green was charged. Witness said that when questioned Green denied having been near the Wiseman home on the 12th November. He accounted for certain money he had as money from a winning bet. He admitted that he had slept in the open on the Saturday night, but he could not show witness the place. He said he had been drunk, but had been able to ride his bicycle.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 1, 1970

IT takes a truly monstrous man to attach alligator clips to the ears of his sleeping wife and children then zap them with electricity.  The sort of cruel coward who would also use a hammer to belt his six-year-old daughter in the head. Elmer Kyle Crawford is just such a man, a coroner found. He acted not in a fit of rage, but after weeks of planning the ghastly murders of his pregnant wife and three children. Crawford electrocuted and bashed his family to death at their home in Cardinal Rd, Glenroy, on July 1, 1970. And he got away with it – so far.

Running through what is known of the killings, it is easy to see why Victorians were appalled. Although not qualified as an electrician, Crawford worked in that capacity for the Victoria Racing Club at Flemington racecourse for 14 years. Workmates told police there was no indication he was capable of such an atrocity. No trouble at home that they knew of. But something troubled Crawford enough to painstakingly plan what he hoped would be the perfect crime — one that would leave him looking like the deserted husband whose wife ran away with the kids. The evidence points to Crawford planning to report his wife and children had gone missing. The new wills he and his wife drafted two weeks earlier would have left him very comfortably off. He was forced to rapidly change plans and disappear after a quirk of fate meant the bodies didn’t sink in the ocean without trace as planned. Crawford was busy cleaning up the blood in the family home when he found out the car he had earlier pushed off a cliff hadn’t disappeared into the Blowhole at Loch Ard Gorge near Port Campbell. Indeed it had been found teetering on a ledge just above the churning sea. He abandoned plans to destroy all incriminating evidence and simply disappeared .

Police have been unable to establish why Crawford murdered his wife Therese, 35, and children Kathryn, 13, James, 8 and Karen, 6. One possibility is the couple argued over whether or not to terminate Therese’s fourth pregnancy. That theory is based on an unfinished letter from Mrs Crawford to her family in which she indicated she wasn’t happy about being pregnant again. “I have been so upset, but what’s the use, I am two and a half months now,” she wrote. “So looks like I have had it this time. “We were going to come up home this Christmas but won’t be able to now as I’ll be due the end of January.” Police found the letter along with a newspaper article about abortion written by prominent Right to Life campaigner Margaret Tighe. They also discovered items Crawford had stolen from the VRC and evidence he had been selling stolen goods for years. That led to another theory, that Mrs Crawford may have found out her husband was a thief and threatened to expose him.

Evidence left by Crawford paints a chilling picture of how he killed his family. He made a bizarre electrocution device consisting of a 15m length of electrical cord with a plug at one end and an extension cord socket on the other. Running from the main cord were five smaller leads, each with alligator clips on the end. Crawford waited until his wife and children were asleep before murdering them. He used his electrocution device on his wife, eldest daughter Kathryn and James. Crawford also bashed Kathryn and James in the head, almost certainly with a hammer, fracturing their skulls. Little Karen was spared electrocution, but she was beaten to death with the hammer. Crawford had earlier removed the back seat of his 1956 Holden sedan so he could stack the four pyjama-clad bodies inside. He wrapped each body in a blanket and then put a tarpaulin over them. He then drove hundreds of kilometres to Loch Ard Gorge. But a drainage ditch just before the edge of the cliff stopped him from pushing the car over the edge. Undeterred, he spent an estimated two hours building a bridge of rocks so he could roll the car down the slight slope, across his makeshift bridge and over the cliff. His intention was that it would plunge into the Blowhole and never be seen again. As an extra precaution, in case the car and the bodies were later found, he attached a hose to the exhaust and jammed it through the driver’s side window to make it look as though Mrs Crawford had committed suicide after beating her children to death. That’s probably why she was the only one electrocuted and not bashed. As he pushed the car over the cliff, Crawford would not have seen the rocky ledge 16m below. Thinking his grisly task complete, Crawford made his way back home. Police don’t know how he returned to Glenroy, but it is possible he hitchhiked or rode a small motor scooter he carried to Port Campbell in the boot with the bodies. They believe he murdered his family and tried to dispose of the bodies sometime between sunset on July 1 and the early hours of July 2.

Sightseers first noticed the car perched precariously on the ledge at the Blowhole at 1.30pm on July 2. Crawford was seen in the driveway of his home at 5.50pm that day. Broadmeadows police officer John McCarty was sent to the Crawford home at 6.20pm after a registration number check revealed the car was owned by Crawford. It had not yet been possible to search the car because it was a dangerous process requiring cliff rescue experts. Evidence suggests Crawford was inside the house cleaning up blood when Constable McCarty knocked on the door. The knock went unanswered and, because it was just a routine inquiry at that stage, Constable McCarty went back to the station. Police presume it was at this point Crawford abandoned his plan to pretend his wife and children had left him and fled himself. Constable McCarty went back to the house at 10pm after receiving information from Port Campbell there was a rifle in the car and blood on the seats. He and another officer broke in when no-one answered the door. They discovered blood-stained sheets and mattresses. The homicide squad was called in and arrangements made to search the car at first light the next day.

Cliff rescue volunteers George Cumming and Cecil Burgin were lowered down, secured the car to prevent it slipping into the sea then started to search it. “We lifted the tarpaulin and Cec Burgin said ‘I can see some feet’ and as the tarpaulin was lifted further I saw three sets of feet,” Mr Cumming said.”When the tarpaulin was moved a bedspread was folded back and I saw four bodies wrapped in bed sheets.” Homicide squad detective Adrian Donehue, who went on to become head of the major crime squad, was at the top of the cliff that day.” I made an examination of each of the bodies as they were brought up,” he said. He was the first to realise the savagery of a crime that has haunted several generations of Victorian police.

Editors note – This article on the Crawford murders is explored in more detail in the excellent book “Almost Perfect” by Greg Fogarty.

ON THIS DAY – FEBRUARY 2, 1992

Notorious Bega schoolgirl killer Leslie Camilleri has been jailed for 28 years for the murder of 13-year-old Prue Bird in 1992. Victorian Supreme Court Justice Elizabeth Curtain said she was satisfied Camilleri, 43, who is already serving two life sentences without parole for raping and murdering Bega schoolgirls Lauren Barry and Nichole Collins in 1997, and two other men had abducted and murdered Prue. Justice Curtain said she had rejected Camilleri’s claims that he had acted alone. She said Camilleri and the two other men had abducted a defenceless 13-year-old from her home in circumstances that must have been terrifying for her. She said the evidence did not disclose how Prue was murdered but Camilleri’s conduct “bespeaks criminality of the highest order”. Camilleri had shown “a cruel and callous disregard for the sanctity of human life”. Justice Curtain did not believe Camilleri’s account that he alone had grabbed Prue as she walked along the street outside her Glenroy home on February 2, 1992. Camilleri claimed he put Prue face down on the back seat of his car and tied her arms and legs with electrical cables before driving around for several hours. Camilleri said when he later pulled over to the side of the road, he realised she was dead. Justice Curtain said Camilleri’s claim that the death was an accident was inconsistent with his guilty plea to murder but she accepted there was no evidence to prove Prue had been sexually assaulted before she was killed. Camilleri had claimed he dumped Prue’s body at a garbage tip in Frankston but police found nothing after digging up the site and a check of council records revealed it was not used as a tip at the time. Defence barrister John Kelly said Camilleri had tried his best to remember where he had left Prue’s body but his memory had been affected by drug taking at the time. Camilleri, who had been on parole after being jailed for assault in Queensland, said that as he was driving Prue’s body to the tip he also had in the car the dismembered body of a man he had murdered for abusing him as a child. Camilleri, a father of four who has converted to Islam while in jail, said he had placed Prue’s body, which he had wrapped in a quilt, inside a discarded wardrobe. Justice Curtain said she was satisfied, based on the evidence of a witness, that Camilleri and another man had been driving around the streets of Glenroy looking for a young girl. Another witness said she saw Prue being driven away by two men. A third man was seen nearby in a second car. The witness, who the judge said was credible, said Prue looked like she was waving and banging on the car’s window as if to say, “Help me, help me.” This witness did not go to the police because “you don’t think your friend is going to be kidnapped”. Police believe Prue was killed between the day she was abducted and nine days later when Camilleri was arrested interstate on outstanding warrants. Prue has not been seen or heard from since February 2, 1992 and her body has never been found. Outside court, Prue’s mother Jenny said she was totally exhausted after more than two decades of trying to find out what had happened to her daughter. “I’m glad of the outcome. “I knew he (Camilleri) didn’t act alone. I knew he was lying. This is the best I was hoping for that it was ruled he didn’t act alone.” Mrs Bird said she still prayed that one day Prue’s body would be found so she could lay her to rest. “I still don’t know what happened to Prue, I still haven’t got Prue. I hope one day that I get to know.”

 

 

ON THIS DAY – 20th December 1938

George Green, 38, chimney sweep, of West Heidleberg, was committed for trail on a charge of having murdered Annie Wiseman, 62, and her niece. Phyllis Wiseman, 17, at Glenroy on the 12th of November. Charles Anthony Taylor, Government analyst, gave evidence of having found soot on a bicycle pump handed to him by the police. He said he also examined the Wiseman house and articles of clothing. In a room in the house he found a hair 18 in. long on a carpet. The way the hair was embedded in the carpet indicated that a head had been violently moved from side to side on the carpet. He found human bloodstains in the carpet. On a pyjama coat worn by Phyllis Wiseman there were smears of blood and discoloured marks near the neck suggested that she had been stabbed and pulled by a dirty hand. The same type of mark was found on a pink undergarment. Detective-sergeant Sickerdick gave evidence of a conversation he had with Green before Green was charged. Witness said that when questioned Green denied having been near the Wiseman home on the 12th November. He accounted for certain money he had as money from a winning bet. He admitted that he had slept in the open on the Saturday night, but he could not show witness the place. He said he had been drunk, but had been able to ride his bicycle.

 

Aerial view of the crime scene of the Wiseman murders

Glenroy Murder

Aerial view of the crime scene of the Wiseman murders

‘It might well be that when the murderer entered the house no thought of murder was in his mind end that his motive was one of stealing.’ This theory was put forward to-day by the Crown Prosecutor (M’. F. Book), at the trial of a chimney sweep (George Green, 38) who pleaded not guilty to having murdered an aged woman and her niece. The victims were Annie Wiseman (62) and Phyllis Wiseman (17), who were found strangled in their lonely home at Glenroy on November 13.

Detectives examining crime scene

Detectives examining crime scene

‘Two innocent, inoffensive women were killed in their own bedrooms, apparently by a man who intruded into the house some time during the night to steal,’ said Mr. Book, ‘but it ‘s clear from the evidence that he did not hesitate to kill both women in the course of the commission of that criminal offence.’ The trial is part heard.

FURTHER REMAND

Double Murder Case

On a charge of having murdered Annie Constance Wiseman, 62, and her niece, Phyllis Wiseman, 17, at Glenroy, on November 12, George Green, 42. of West Heidelberg, was remanded in the City Court to-day to December 19. Miss Wiseman and her niece were found strangled in Miss Wiseman’s home on November 13. The inquest into their deaths will be held on December 19.